Egla, 09

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 9

King Harold proclaimed a general levy, and gathered a fleet, summoning his forces far and wide through the land. He went out from Throndheim, and bent his course southwards, for he had heard that a large host was gathered throughout Agdir, Rogaland, and Hordaland, assembled from far, both from the inland parts above, and from the east out of Vik, and many great men were there met who purposed to defend their land from the king.

Harold held on his way from the north, with a large force, having his guards on board. In the forecastle of the king's ship were Thorolf Kveldulfsson, Bard the White, Kari of Berdla's sons, Aulvir Hnuf and Eyvind Lambi, and in the prow were twelve Berserks of the king. The fleets met south in Rogaland in Hafr's Firth. There was fought the greatest battle that king Harold had had, with much slaughter in either host. The king set his own ship in the van, and there the battle was most stubborn, but the end was that king Harold won the victory. Thorir Longchin, king of Agdir, fell there, but Kjotvi the wealthy fled with all his men that could stand, save some that surrendered after the battle. When the roll of Harold's army was called, many were they that had fallen, and many were sore wounded. Thorolf was badly wounded, Bard even worse; nor was there a man unwounded in the king's ship before the mast, except those whom iron bit not to wit the Berserks. Then the king had his men's wounds bound up, and thanked them for their valour, and gave them gifts, adding most praise where he thought it most deserved. He promised them also further honour, naming some to be steersmen, others forecastle men, others bow-sitters. This was the last battle king Harold had within the land; after this none withstood him; he was supreme over all Norway. The king saw to the healing of his men, whose wounds gave them hope of life, as also to the burial of the dead with all customary honours.

Thorolf and Bard lay wounded. Thorolf's wounds began to heal, but Bard's proved mortal. Then Bard had the king called to him, and spoke thus: 'If it so be that I die of these wounds, then I would ask this of thee, that I may myself name my heir.'

To this when the king assented, then said he: 'I will that Thorolf my friend and kinsman take all my heritage, both lands and chattels. To him, also, will I give my wife and the bringing up of my son, because I trust him for this above all men.'

This arrangement he made fast, as the law was, with the leave of the king. Then Bard died, and was buried, and his death was much mourned. Thorolf was healed of his wounds, and followed the king, and had won great glory.

In the autumn the king went north to Throndheim. Then Thorolf asked to go north to Halogaland, to see after those gifts which he had received in the summer from his kinsman Bard. The king gave leave for this, adding a message and tokens that Thorolf should take all that Bard had given him, showing that the gift was with the counsel of the king, and that he would have it so. Then the king made Thorolf a baron, and granted him all the rights which Bard had had before, giving him the journey to the Finns on the same terms. He also supplied to Thorolf a good long-ship, with tackling complete, and had everything made ready for his journey thence in the best possible way. So Thorolf set out, and he and the king parted with great affection.

But when Thorolf came north to Torgar, he was well received. He told them of Bard's death; also how Bard had left him both lands and chattels, and her that had been his wife; then he showed the king's order and tokens.

When Sigridr heard these tidings, she felt her great loss in her husband, but with Thorolf she was already well acquainted, and knew him for a man of great mark; and this promise of her in marriage was good, and besides there was the king's command. So she and her friends saw it to be the best plan that she should be betrothed to Thorolf, unless that were against her father's mind. Thereupon Thorolf took all the management of the property, and also the king's business.

Soon after this Thorolf started with a long-ship and about sixty men, and coasted northwards, till one day at eventide he came to Sandness in Alost; there they moored the ship. And when they had raised their tent, and made arrangements, Thorolf went up to the farm buildings with twenty men. Sigurd received him well, and asked him to lodge there, for there had been great intimacy between them since the marriage connection between Sigurd and Bard. Then Thorolf and his men went into the hall, and were there entertained.

Sigurd sat and talked with Thorolf, and asked tidings. Thorolf told of the battle fought that summer in the south, and of the fall of many men whom Sigurd knew well, and withal how Bard his son-in-law had died of wounds received in the battle. This they both felt to be a great loss. Then Thorolf told Sigurd what had been the covenant between him and Bard before he died, and he declared also the orders of the king, how he would have all this hold good, and this he showed by the tokens. After this Thorolf entered on his wooing with Sigurd, and asked Sigridr, his daughter, to wife. Sigurd received the proposal well; he said there were many reasons for this; first, the king would have it so; next, Bard had asked it; and further he himself knew Thorolf well, and thought it a good match for his daughter. Thus Sigurd was easily won to grant this suit; whereupon the betrothal was made, and the wedding was fixed for the autumn at Torgar.

Then Thorolf went home to his estate, and his comrades with him. There he prepared a great feast,[1] and bade many thereto. Of Thorolf's kin many were present, men of renown.

Sigurd also came thither from the north with a long-ship and a chosen crew. Numerously attended was that feast, and it was at once seen that Thorolf was free-handed and munificent. He kept about him a large following, whereof the cost was great, and much provision was needed; but the year was good, and needful supplies were easily found.

During that winter Sigurd died at Sandness, and Thorolf was heir to all his property; this was great wealth.

Now the sons of Hildirida came to Thorolf, and put in the claim which they thought they had on the property that had belonged to their father Bjorgolf.

Thorolf answered them thus:[2] 'This I knew of Brynjolf, and still better of Bard, that they were men so generous that they would have let you have of Bjorgolf's heritage[3] what share they knew to be your right. I was present when ye two put in this same claim on Bard, and I heard what he thought, that there was no ground for it, for he called you illegitimate.'

Harek said that they would bring witnesses that their mother was duly bought with payment.

'It is true that we did not at first treat of this matter with Brynjolf our brother it was a case of sharing between kinsmen, but of Bard we hoped to get our dues in every respect, though our dealings with him were not for long. Now however this heritage has come to men who are in nowise our kin, and we cannot be altogether silent about our wrong; but it may be that, as before, might will so prevail that we get not our right of thee in this, if thou refuse to hear the witness that we can bring to prove us honourably born.'

Thorolf then answered angrily: 'So far am I from thinking you legitimate heirs[4] that I am told your mother was taken by force, and carried home as a captive.'[5]

After that they left talking altogether.

References

  1. a great feast: “In the Viking age, a wedding banquet and the gifts given to the guests proved not only the greatness of the host but also that the marriage was official. There were neither government offices nor records by a notary to prove a martial relationship status in the old societies of the Nordic countries and thus, whether a marital relationship is official or not was depending on testimonies and gifts at a wedding as physical evidences.” (Japanese text: 「盛大な結婚の宴と贈与は、ホストの名誉のほかに、結婚が正式に執り行われたことを証明するという社会的機能をもっていた。婚姻を届けるべき役所もなく、公証人による記録もないヴァイキング時代の北欧社会では、婚姻関係の証明は人々の証言と、証拠となる品物による Satoru, Kumano. Vaikingu no Shōgai (pp. 27-28).
  2. Thorolf answered them thus: “Þetta er meistarabragð Egluhöfundar: Kveld-Úlfur fæðist eigi aðeins í inum myrkari syni sínum. Úlfurinn ýlfrar einnig í þeim inum bjartari [...] – Það er ekki Grímur ... sem vinnur óhappaverkið. Það er laukur ættarinnar, sólskinsbarnið Þórólfur.“ Einar Pálsson. Eymd Egils. Chapters 61-70 (p. 154).
  3. Bjorgolf's heritage: "These disputed claims to the property of Björgolfr and Björn are what upset the equilibrium between Haraldr and Kveld-Úlfr and their descendants, and what make it impossible for these families to establish and maintain a modus vivendi in Norway." Fichtner, Edward G.. The Narrative Structure of Egils saga (p. 363).
  4. legitimate heirs: "Þórólfr aber beharrt auf der Ablehnung ihrer Ansprüche, indem er geltend macht, dass sie um so weniger erbberechtigt sein könnten, da ihre Mutter mit offener Gewalt in Besitz genommen worden sei." Maurer, Konrad von. Zwei Rechtsfälle in der Eigla (pp. 68-69).
  5. carried home as a captive: ”The uncertainty about the identity of the sons of Hildríðr, whether they are bastards or legitimate heirs, is the ultimate cause of Þórólfr Kveldúlfsson's undoing, they affirming their legacy, he denying it.” Torfi H. Tulinius. Towards a poetics of the Sagas of Icelanders (p. 55).

Kafli 9

Haraldur konungur bauð út leiðangri miklum og dró saman skipaher, stefndi til sín liði víða um lönd. Hann fór úr Þrándheimi og stefndi suður í land. Hann hafði það spurt að her mikill var saman dreginn um Agðir og Rogaland og Hörðaland og víða til safnað, bæði ofan af landi og austan úr Vík, og var þar margt stórmenni saman komið og ætlar að verja land fyrir Haraldi konungi.

Haraldur konungur hélt norðan liði sínu. Hann hafði sjálfur skip mikið og skipað hirð sinni. Þar var í stafni Þórólfur Kveld-Úlfsson og Bárður hvíti og synir Berðlu-Kára, Ölvir hnúfa og Eyvindur lambi, en berserkir konungs tólf voru í söxum. Fundur þeirra var suður á Rogalandi í Hafursfirði. Var þar hin mesta orusta er Haraldur konungur hafði átta og mikið mannfall í hvorratveggju liði. Lagði konungur framarlega skip sitt og var þar ströngust orustan. En svo lauk að Haraldur konungur fékk sigur en þar féll Þórir haklangur, konungur af Ögðum, en Kjötvi hinn auðgi flýði og allt lið hans það er upp stóð, nema það er til handa gekk. Eftir orustuna, þá er kannað var lið Haralds konungs, var margt fallið og margir voru mjög sárir. Þórólfur var sár mjög en Bárður meir og engi var ósár á konungsskipinu fyrir framan siglu nema þeir er eigi bitu járn en það voru berserkir. Þá lét konungur binda sár manna sinna og þakkaði mönnum framgöngu sína og veitti gjafir og lagði þar mest lof til er honum þótti maklegt og hét þeim að auka virðing þeirra, nefndi til þess skipstjórnarmenn og þar næst stafnbúa sína og aðra frambyggja. Þá orustu átti Haraldur konungur síðast innan lands og eftir það fékk hann enga viðstöðu og eignaðist hann síðan land allt. Konungur lét græða menn sína þá er lífs var auðið en veita umbúnað dauðum mönnum, þann sem þá var siðvenja til.

Þórólfur og Bárður lágu í sárum. Tóku sár Þórólfs að gróa en Bárðar sár gerðust banvæn. Þá lét hann kalla konung til sín og sagði honum svo: „Ef svo verður að eg deyi úr þessum sárum þá vil eg þess biðja yður að þér látið mig ráða fyrir arfi mínum.“

En er konungur hafði því játað þá sagði hann: „Arf minn allan vil eg að taki Þórólfur félagi minn og frændi, lönd og lausa aura. Honum vil eg og gefa konu mína og son minn til uppfæðslu því að eg trúi honum til þess best allra manna.“

Hann festir þetta mál sem lög voru til að leyfi konungs. Síðan andast Bárður og var honum veittur umbúnaður og var hann harmdauði mjög. Þórólfur varð heill sára sinna og fylgdi konungi um sumarið og hafði fengið allmikinn orðstír.

Konungur fór um haustið norður til Þrándheims. Þá biður Þórólfur orlofs að fara norður á Hálogaland að vitja gjafar þeirrar er hann hafði þegið um sumarið að Bárði frænda sínum. Konungur lofar það og gerir með orðsending og jartegnir að Þórólfur skal það allt fá er Bárður gaf honum, lætur það að sú gjöf var ger með ráði konungs og hann vill svo vera láta. Gerir konungur þá Þórólf lendan mann og veitir honum þá allar veislur þær sem áður hafði Bárður haft, fær honum finnferðina með þvílíkum skildaga sem áður hafði haft Bárður. Konungur gaf Þórólfi langskip gott með reiða öllum og lét búa ferð hans þaðan sem best. Síðan fór Þórólfur þaðan ferð sína og skildust þeir konungur með hinum mesta kærleik.

En er Þórólfur kom norður í Torgar þá var honum þar vel fagnað. Sagði hann þá fráfall Bárðar og það með að Bárður hafði gefið honum eftir sig lönd og lausa aura og kvonfang það er hann hafði áður átt, ber fram síðan orð konungs og jartegnir.

En er Sigríður heyrði þessi tíðindi þá þótti henni skaði mikill eftir mann sinn. En Þórólfur var henni áður mjög kunnigur og vissi hún að hann var hinn mesti merkismaður og það gjaforð var allgott. Og með því að það var konungs boð þá sá hún það að ráði og með henni vinir hennar að heitast Þórólfi ef það væri föður hennar eigi í móti skapi. Síðan tók Þórólfur þar við forráðum öllum og svo við konungssýslu.

Þórólfur gerði heimanför sína og hafði langskip og á nær sex tigu manna og fór síðan er hann var búinn norður með landi. Og einn dag að kveldi kom hann í Álöst á Sandnes. Lögðu skip sitt til hafnar. En er þeir höfðu tjaldað og um búist fór Þórólfur upp til bæjar með tuttugu menn. Sigurður fagnaði honum vel og bauð honum þar að vera því að þar voru áður kunnleikar miklir með þeim síðan er mægð hafði tekist með þeim Sigurði og Bárði. Síðan gengu þeir Þórólfur inn í stofu og tóku þar gisting.

Sigurður settist á tal við Þórólf og spurði að tíðindum. Þórólfur sagði frá orustu þeirri er verið hafði um sumarið suður á landi og fall margra manna þeirra er Sigurður vissi deili á. Þórólfur sagði að Bárður mágur hans hafði andast úr sárum þeim er hann fékk í orustu. Þótti það báðum þeim hinn mesti mannskaði. Þá segir Þórólfur Sigurði hvað verið hafði í einkamálum með þeim Bárði áður hann andaðist og svo bar hann fram orðsendingar konungs að hann vildi það allt haldast láta og sýndi þar með jartegnir. Síðan hóf Þórólfur upp bónorð sitt við Sigurð og bað Sigríðar dóttur hans. Sigurður tók því máli vel, sagði að margir hlutir héldu til þess, sá fyrstur að konungur vill svo vera láta, svo það að Bárður hafði þess beðið og það með að Þórólfur var honum kunnigur og honum þótti dóttir sín vel gift. Var það mál auðsótt við Sigurð. Fóru þá fram festar og ákveðin brullaupsstefna í Torgum um haustið.

Fór þá Þórólfur heim til bús síns og hans förunautar og bjó þar til veislu mikillar[1] og bauð þangað fjölmenni miklu. Var þar margt frænda Þórólfs göfugra. Sigurður bjóst og norðan og hafði langskip mikið og mannval gott. Var að þeirri veislu hið mesta fjölmenni.

Brátt fannst það að Þórólfur var ör maður og stórmenni mikið. Hafði hann um sig sveit mikla en brátt gerðist kostnaðarmikið og þurfti föng mikil. Þá var ár gott og auðvelt að afla þess er þurfti.

Á þeim vetri andaðist Sigurður á Sandnesi og tók Þórólfur arf allan eftir hann. Var það allmikið fé.

Þeir synir Hildiríðar fóru á fund Þórólfs og hófu upp tilkall það er þeir þóttust þar eiga um fé það er átt hafði Björgólfur faðir þeirra.

Þórólfur svarar svo: „Það var mér kunnigt of Brynjólf og enn kunnara um Bárð að þeir voru manndómsmenn svo miklir að þeir mundu hafa miðlað ykkur það af arfi Björgólfs[2] sem þeir vissu að réttindi væru til. Var eg nær því að þið hófuð þetta sama ákall við Bárð og heyrðist mér svo sem honum þætti þar engi sannindi til því að hann kallaði ykkur frillusonu.“

Hárekur sagði að þeir mundu vitni til fá að móðir þeirra var mundi keypt „en satt var það að við leituðum ekki fyrst þessa mála við Brynjólf bróður okkarn, var þar og með skyldum að skipta. En af Bárði væntum við okkur sæmdar í alla staði, urðu og eigi löng vor viðskipti. En nú er arfur þessi kominn undir óskylda menn okkur og megum við nú eigi með öllu þegja yfir missu okkarri. En vera kann að enn sé sem fyrr sá ríkismunur að við fáum eigi rétt af þessu máli fyrir þér ef þú vilt engi vitni heyra, þau er við höfum fram að flytja, að við séum menn aðalbornir.“

Þórólfur svarar þá stygglega:[3] „Því síður ætla eg ykkur arfborna[4] að mér er sagt móðir ykkur væri með valdi tekin og hernumin heim höfð“.[5]

Eftir það skildu þeir þessa ræðu.


Tilvísanir

  1. veislu mikillar: “In the Viking age, a wedding banquet and the gifts given to the guests proved not only the greatness of the host but also that the marriage was official. There were neither government offices nor records by a notary to prove a martial relationship status in the old societies of the Nordic countries and thus, whether a marital relationship is official or not was depending on testimonies and gifts at a wedding as physical evidences.” (Japanese text: 「盛大な結婚の宴と贈与は、ホストの名誉のほかに、結婚が正式に執り行われたことを証明するという社会的機能をもっていた。婚姻を届けるべき役所もなく、公証人による記録もないヴァイキング時代の北欧社会では、婚姻関係の証明は人々の証言と、証拠となる品物による Satoru, Kumano. Vaikingu no Shōgai (s. 27-28).
  2. arfi Björgólfs: "These disputed claims to the property of Björgolfr and Björn are what upset the equilibrium between Haraldr and Kveld-Úlfr and their descendants, and what make it impossible for these families to establish and maintain a modus vivendi in Norway." Fichtner, Edward G.. The Narrative Structure of Egils saga (s. 363).
  3. Þórólfur svarar þá stygglega: “Þetta er meistarabragð Egluhöfundar: Kveld-Úlfur fæðist eigi aðeins í inum myrkari syni sínum. Úlfurinn ýlfrar einnig í þeim inum bjartari [...] –Það er ekki Grímur ... sem vinnur óhappaverkið. Það er laukur ættarinnar, sólskinsbarnið Þórólfur.“ Einar Pálsson. Eymd Egils. Chapters 61-70 (s. 154).
  4. arfborna: „Þórólfr aber beharrt auf der Ablehnung ihrer Ansprüche, indem er geltend macht, dass sie um so weniger erbberechtigt sein könnten, da ihre Mutter mit offener Gewalt in Besitz genommen worden sei.” Maurer, Konrad von. Zwei Rechtsfälle in der Eigla (s. 68-69).
  5. hernumin heim höfð: “The way Egill handles the body, taking care not to be caught in his dead father's gaze, clearly indicates fear that Grímr might come back to haunt him.” Torfi H. Tulinius. Towards a poetics of the Sagas of Icelanders (s. 55).

Links

Personal tools