Egla, 80

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 80

Death of Bodvar: Egil's poem thereon

Bodvar Egil's son was just now growing up; he was a youth of great promise, handsome, tall and strong as had been Egil or Thorolf at his age. Egil loved him dearly, and Bodvar was very fond of his father. One summer it happened that there was a ship in White-river, and a great fair was held there. Egil had there bought much wood, which he was having conveyed home by water: for this his house-carles went, taking with them an eight-oared boat belonging to Egil. It chanced one time that Bodvar begged to go with them, and they allowed him so to do. So he went into the field with the house-carles. They were six in all on the eight-oared boat. And when they had to go out again, high-water was late in the day, and, as they must needs wait for the turn of tide, they did not start till late in the evening. Then came on a violent south-west gale, against which ran the stream of the ebb. This made a rough sea in the firth, as can often happen. The end was that the boat sank under them, and all were lost. The next day the bodies were cast up: Bodvar's body came on shore at Einars-ness, but some came in on the south shore of the firth, whither also the boat was driven, being found far in near Reykjarhamar.

Egil heard these tidings that same day, and at once rode to seek the bodies: he found Bodvar's, took it up and set it on his knees, and rode with it out to Digra-ness, to Skallagrim's mound.[1] Then he had the mound opened, and laid Bodvar down there by Skallagrim. After which the mound was closed again; this task was not finished till about nightfall. Egil then rode home to Borg, and, when he came home, he went at once to the locked bed-closet in which he was wont to sleep. He lay down, and shut himself in,[2] none daring to crave speech of him.

It is said that when they laid Bodvar in earth Egil was thus dressed: his hose were tight-fitting to his legs, he wore a red kirtle of fustian, closely-fitting, and laced at the sides: but they say that his muscles so swelled[3] with his exertion that the kirtle was rent off him, as were also the hose.

On the next day Egil still did not open the bed-closet: he had no meat or drink: there he lay for that day and the following night, no man daring to speak with him. But on the third morning, as soon as it was light, Asgerdr had a man set on horseback, who rode as hard as he could westwards to Hjardarholt, and told Thorgerdr all these tidings; it was about nones when he got there. He said also that Asgerdr had sent her word to come without delay southwards to Borg. Thorgerdr at once bade them saddle her a horse, and two men attended her. They rode that evening and through the night till they came to Borg. Thorgerdr went at once into the hall. Asgerdr greeted her, and asked whether they had eaten supper. Thorgerdr said aloud, 'No supper have I had, and none will I have till I sup with Freyja. I can do no better than does my father: I will not overlive my father and brother.' She then went to the bed-closet and called, 'Father, open the door! I will that we both travel the same road.' Egil undid the lock. Thorgerdr stepped up into the bed-closet, and locked the door again, and lay down on another bed that was there.

Then said Egil, 'You do well, daughter, in that you will follow your father. Great love have you shown to me. What hope is there that I shall wish to live with this grief?'[4] After this they were silent awhile. Then Egil spoke: 'What is it now, daughter? You are chewing something, are you not?' 'I am chewing samphire,'[5][6] said she, 'because I think it will do me harm. Otherwise I think I may live too long.' 'Is samphire bad for man?' said Egil. 'Very bad,' said she; 'will you eat some?'[7] 'Why should I not?' said he. A little while after she called and bade them give her drink. Water was brought to her. Then said Egil, 'This comes of eating samphire,[8] one ever thirsts the more.'[9] 'Would you like a drink,[10] father?' said she. He took and swallowed the liquid in a deep draught: it was in a horn. Then said Thorgerdr: 'Now are we deceived;[11][12] this is milk.'[13] Whereat Egil bit a sherd out of the horn, all that his teeth gripped, and cast the horn down.

Then spoke Thorgerdr: 'What counsel shall we take now? This our purpose is defeated. Now I would fain, father, that we should lengthen our lives, so that you may compose a funeral poem[14] on Bodvar, and I will grave it on a wooden roller; after that we can die, if we like. Hardly, I think, can Thorstein your son compose a poem on Bodvar; but it were unseemly that he should not have funeral rites. Though I do not think that we two shall sit at the drinking when the funeral feast is held.' Egil said that it was not to be expected that he could now compose,[15] though he were to attempt it. 'However, I will try this,'[16] said he.

Egil had had another son named Gunnar, who had died a short time before.

So then Egil began the poem,[17][18] and this is the beginning.[19]

SONA-TORREK (SONS' LOSS).

1.
'Much doth it task me[20]
My tongue to move,[21]
Through my throat to utter
The breath of song.[22]
Poesy, prize of Odin,
Promise now I may not,
A draught drawn not lightly[23]
From deep thought's dwelling.[24]

2.
'Forth it flows but hardly;[25]
For within my breast
Heaving sobbing stifles
Hindered stream of song
Blessed boon to mortals
Brought from Odin's kin,
Goodly treasure,[26] stolen
From Giant-land of yore. [27]

3.
'He, who so blameless
Bore him in life,
O'erborne by billows[28]
With boat was whelmed.
Sea-wavesflood that whilom
Welled from giant's wound
Smite upon the grave-gate
Of my sire and son.

4.
'Dwindling now my kindred[29]
Draw near to their end,[30]
Ev'n as forest-saplings.[31]
Felled or tempest-strown.[32]
Not gay or gladsome
Goes he who beareth
Body of kinsman
On funeral bier.

5.
'Of father fallen
First I may tell;
Of much-loved mother
Must mourn the loss.
Sad store hath memory
For minstrel skill,
A wood to bloom leafy
With words of song.[33]

6.
'Most woful the breach,
Where the wave in-brake
On the fenced hold
Of my father's kin.
Unfilled, as I wot,
And open doth stand
The gap of son rent
By the greedy surge.

7.
'Me Ran, the sea-queen,
Roughly hath shaken:
I stand of beloved ones
Stript and all bare.
Cut hath the billow
The cord of my kin,[34]
Strand of mine own[35] twisting
So stout and strong.[36]

8.
'Sure, if sword could venge[37]
Such cruel wrong,
Evil times would wait
Ægir, ocean-god.[38]
That wind-giant's brother
Were I strong to slay,
'Gainst him and his sea-brood
Battling would I go.[39]

9.
'But I in no wise
Boast, as I ween,
Strength that may strive
With the stout ships' Bane.
For to eyes of all
Easy now 'tis seen
How the old man's lot
Helpless is and lone.

10.
'Me hath the main
Of much bereaved;[40]
Dire is the tale,
The deaths of kin:
Since he the shelter
And shield of my house
Hied him from life
To heaven's glad realm.

11.
'Full surely I know,
In my son was waxing
The stuff and the strength[41]
Of a stout-limbed wight:
Had he reached but ripeness
To raise his shield,
And Odin laid hand
On his liegeman true.

12.
'Willing he followed
His father's word,
Though all opposing
Should thwart my rede:
He in mine household
Mine honour upheld,
Of my power and rule
The prop and the stay.

13.
'Oft to my mind
My loss doth come,
How I brotherless bide
Bereaved and lone.
Thereon I bethink me,
When thickens the fight
Thereon with much searching
My soul doth muse:

14.
'Who staunch stands by me
In stress of fight,
Shoulder to shoulder,
Side by side?
Such want doth weaken
In war's dread hour;
Weak-winged I fly,
Whom friends all fail.

15.
'Son's place to his sire
(Saith a proverb true)
Another son born
Alone can fill.
Of kinsmen none
(Though ne'er so kind)
To brother can stand
In brother's stead.

16.
'O'er all our ice-fields,
Our northern snows,[42]
Few now I find
Faithful and true.
Dark deeds men love,
Doom death to their kin,
A brother's body
Barter for gold.

17.
'Unpleasing to me
Our people's mood,
Each seeking his own
In selfish peace.
To the happier bees' home
Hath passed my son,
My good wife's child
To his glorious kin.

18.
'Odin, mighty monarch,[43]
Of minstrel mead the lord,
On me a heavy hand
Harmful doth lay.
Gloomy in unrest
Ever I grieve,
Sinks my drooping brow,
Seat of sight and thought.

19.
'Fierce fire of sickness
First from my home
Swept off a son[44]
With savage blow:
One who was heedful,
Harmless, I wot,
In deeds unblemished,
In words unblamed.

20.
'Still do I mind me,
When the Friend of men
High uplifted
To the home of gods
That sapling stout
Of his father's stem,
Of my true wife born
A branch so fair. [45]

21.
'Once bare I goodwill[46]
To the great spear-lord,
Him trusty and true
I trowed for friend:
Ere the giver of conquest,
The car-borne god,
Broke faith and friendship[47]
False in my need.

22.
'Now victim and worship
To Vilir's brother,
The god once honoured,
I give no more.[48]
Yet the friend of Mimir[49]

On me hath bestowed
Some boot for bale,[50]
If all boons I tell. [51]

23.
'Yea he, the wolf-tamer,
The war-god skilful,[52]
Gave poesy[53] faultless[54]
To fill my soul:
Gave wit to know well
Each wily trickster,
And force him to face me
As foeman in fight.

24.
'Hard am I beset;[55]
Whom Hela, the sister
Of Odin's fell captive,
On Digra-ness waits.
Yet shall I gladly
With right good welcome[56]
Dauntless in bearing
Her death-blow bide.'.[57]

Egil began to cheer up[58] as the composing of the poem[59] went on; and when the poem was complete,[60] he brought it before Asgerdr and Thorgerdr and his family. He rose from his bed, and took his place in the high-seat.[61] This poem he called 'Loss of Sons.'[62] [63] And now Egil had the funeral feast of his son held after ancient custom. But when Thorgerdr went home, Egil enriched her with good gifts.

Long time did Egil dwell at Borg, and became an old man. But it is not told that he had lawsuits with any here in the land; nor is there a word of single combats, or war and slaughter of his after he settled down here in Iceland.[64] They say that Egil never went abroad out of Iceland after the events already related. And for this the main cause was that Egil might not be in Norway, by reason of the charges which (as has been told before) the kings there deemed they had against him. [65] He kept house in munificent style, for there was no lack of money, and his disposition led him to munificence. King Hacon, Athelstan's foster-son, long ruled over Norway; but in the latter part of his life Eric's sons came to Norway and strove with him for the kingdom; and they had battles together, wherein Hacon ever won the victory. The last battle was fought in Hordaland, on Stord-island, at Fitjar: there king Hacon won the victory, but also got his death-wound. After that Eric's sons took the kingdom in Norway. Lord Arinbjorn was with Harold Eric's son, and was made his counsellor, and had of him great honours. He was commander of his forces and defender of the land. A great warrior was Arinbjorn, and a victorious. He was governor of the Firth folk. Egil Skallagrimsson heard these tidings of the change of kings in Norway, and therewith how Arinbjorn had returned to his estates in Norway, and was there in great honour. Then Egil composed a poem[66] about Arinbjorn,[67] whereof this is the beginning:[68]

ARINBJORN'S EPIC, OR A PART THEREOF.

1.
'For generous prince[69]
Swift praise I find,[70]
But stint my words
To stingy churl.
Openly sing I
Of king's true deeds,
But silence keep
On slander's lies.

2.
'For fabling braggarts
Full am I of scorn,
But willing speak I
Of worthy friends:
Courts I of monarchs[71]
A many have sought,
A gallant minstrel
Of guileless mood.

3.
'Erewhile the anger
Of Yngling's son
I bore, prince royal
Of race divine.
With hood of daring
O'er dark locks drawn
A lord right noble
I rode to seek.

4.
'There sate in might
The monarch strong,
With helm of terror
High-throned and dread;
A king unbending
With bloody blade
Within York city
Wielded he power.

5.
'That moon-like brightness
Might none behold,
Nor brook undaunted
Great Eric's brow:
As fiery serpent[72]
His flashing eyes
Shot starry radiance
Stern and keen.

6.
'Yet I to this ruler
Of fishful seas
My bolster-mate's ransom
Made bold to bear,
Of Odin's goblet
O'erflowing dew
Each listening ear-mouth
Eagerly drank.

7.
'Not beauteous in seeming
My bardic fee
To ranks of heroes
In royal hall:
When I my hood-knoll[73][74]
Wolf-gray of hue
For mead of Odin
From monarch gat.

8.
'Thankful I took it,
And therewithal
The pit-holes black
Of my beetling brows;[75]
Yea and that mouth
That for me bare
The poem of praise[76]
To princely knees.

9.
'Tooth-fence took I,
And tongue likewise,
Ears' sounding chambers
And sheltering eaves.
And better deemed I
Than brightest gold
The gift[77] then given
By glorious king.

10.
'There a staunch stay
Stood by my side,
One man worth many
Of meaner wights,
Mine own true friend
Whom trusty I found,
High-couraged ever
In counsels bold.

11.
'Arinbjorn
Alone us saved
Foremost of champions
From fury of king;
Friend of the monarch
He framed no lies
Within that palace
Of warlike prince.

12.
'Of the stay of our house
Still spake he truth,
(While much he honoured
My hero-deeds)
Of the son of Kveldulf,
Whom fair-haired king
Slew for a slander,
But honoured slain.

13.
'Wrong were it if he
Who wrought me good,
Gold-splender lavish,
Such gifts had cast
To the wasteful tract
Of the wild sea-mew,
To the surge rough-ridden
By sea-kings' steeds.

14.
'False to my friend
Were I fairly called,
An untrue steward
Of Odin's cup;
Of praise unworthy,
Pledge-breaker vile,
If I for such good
Gave nought again.

15.
'Now better seeth
The bard to climb
With feet poetic
The frowning steep,[78]
And set forth open
In sight of all
The laud and honour
Of high-born chief.

16.
'Now shall my voice-plane
Shape into song
Virtues full many
Of valiant friend.
Ready on tongue
Twofold they lie,
Yea, threefold praises
Of Thorir's son.

17.
'First tell I forth
What far is known,
Openly bruited
In ears of all;
How generous of mood
Men deem this lord,
Bjorn of the hearth-fire
The birchwood's bane.

18.
'Folk bear witness
With wond'ring praise,
How to all guests
Good gifts he gives:
For Bjorn of the hearth-stone
Is blest with store
Freely and fully
By Frey and Njord.

19.
'To him, high scion
Of Hroald's tree,
Fulness of riches
Flowing hath come;
And friends ride thither
In thronging crowd
By all wide ways
'Neath windy heaven.

20.
'Above his ears[79]
Around his brow
A coronal fair,
As a king, he wore.
Beloved of gods,
Beloved of men,
The warrior's friend,
The weakling's aid.

21.
'That mark he hitteth
That most men miss;
Though money they gather,
This many lack:
For few be the bounteous
And far between,
Nor easily shafted
Are all men's spears.

22.
'Out of the mansion
Of Arinbjorn,
When guested and rested
In generous wise,
None with hard jest,
None with rude jeer,Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag
Word I gathered,
Toiled each morning
With speech-moulding tongue.
A proud pile[80] built I
Of praise long-lasting
To stand unbroken[81]
In Bragi's town.'

References

  1. to Skallagrim's mound: "Egill est responsable de la mort de son frère ainé. En plus, il refuse de donner à son père la compensation qui lui est destinée. Celui-ci décide de revenir après la mort pour se venger sur son fils cadet. Celui-ci fait pourtant de son mieux pour l’empêcher de revenir, mais il n’y arrive pas. Le fait qu’il place le cadavre de son fils noyé dans le tertre de son père indique qu’il pense que ce dernier a causé sa mort." Torfi H. Tulinius. Thykir mér gódh sonareign í thér (p. ??).
  2. He lay down, and shut himself in: "Det finns några utförliga beskrivningar av situationer där folk tycks eftersträva ett hamnskiftesliknande tillstånd. Personen i fråga går vanligen och lägger sig för sig själv. Kravet på isolering återkommer ständigt. Omgivningen instrueras att inte tilltala den som genomgår hamnskiftesproceduren." Ralph, Bo. Om tilkomsten av Sonatorrek (p. 162).
  3. his muscles so swelled: "Í útgáfu Finns Jónssonar af sögunni frá 1924 og í útgáfu Sigurðar Nordals frá 1933 er þegar hér er komið sögunni minnt á lýsingu Völsunga sögu á harmi Sigurðar Fáfnisbana eftir viðræðu þeirra Brynhildar, þar sem þau höfðu játað hvort öðru ást sína um leið og þau viðurkenndiu að ekki gæti annað af henni leitt en hörmung og dauða." Bjarni Einarsson. Um fáein harmræn atriði í Völsunga sögu og Egils sögu (p. 10).
  4. live with this grief: "Völu-Steinn og Egill heyja helstríð af harmi eftir syni sína […] Um áhrif Landnámu á Egils sögu […] mætti spyrja hvort það sé ekki einmitt frásögnin af Völu-Steini sem haft hefur áhrif á sköpun frásagnarinnar um harm Egils. Sonatorrek hefur þá orðið til í hrifnæmum huga þess sem þekkti til Ögmundardrápu" Baldur Hafstað. HSk, Landnáma og Egils saga (p. 32).
  5. I am chewing samphire: "Hér er... líklegast fyrsta tilvitnun um sölvaát í fornsögum okkar, og má ætla að sú matarvenja hafi fluttst hingað með landnámsmönnum... [Söl voru] snar þáttur í fæðuöflun landsmanna, en þó var bundið landshlutum, hélst svo gegnum aldir, en fór minnkandi og lagðist alveg af í byrjun þessarar aldar." Sigurður Samúelsson. Sjúkdómar og dánarmein íslenskra fornmanna (p. 263).
  6. samphire: "Eine von Islands essbaren Tangarten, deren Beschaffenheit aber damals wohl noch nicht allgemein bekannt war." Glückselig, Anton Thormod. Skaldenlieder aus der Egils-Saga (p. 183).
  7. will you eat some: "C´est ainsi qu´elle mâche des algues pour avoir une raison de faire apporter de l´eau. [...] Mais ce n'est pas uniquement de la mort physique qu´elle le sauve. Si on considère qu'Egill est chrétien, [...], elle est aussi en train de le sauver d'un péché qui menace son salut éternel: le désespoir." Torfi H. Tulinius. Le statut théologique d‘Egill Skalla-Grímsson (p. 285).
  8. This comes of eating samphire: "“Den [Egils söl-replik] har en tydlig rytm, och dess allitterationer: slíkt-sölin, þrystir-þess är påtagliga. Repliken låter sig otvunget uppfatta som vers och arrangera som en helming i oklanderlig ljóðháttr med naturliga höjningar och allitterationer i både det inledande versparet och fullraden […] En replik lagd i Egils mun i form av en helming i ljóðháttr strax innan han gick att dikta sin odödliga Sonatorrek i kviðuháttr kan vara en rätt passande upptakt.” Salberger, Evert. Egils sol-replik före Sonatorrek (pp. 22-23).
  9. This comes of eating samphire, one ever thirsts the more : "Egils sǫl-replik är således en oklanderlig helming i ljóðaháttr med korsvis allitteration enligt schemat a b a b i det inledande versparet och ett självständigt stavrimssystem c c i fullraden. Dold I släktsagans prosa röjer den klar versifikatorisk konstnärlighet." Salberger, Evert. Metrisk till Egils “söl”-replik (p. 32).
  10. Would you like a drink: "Ef Egils saga hefur verið sögð í gildi, þar sem þekkt var táknmál kristinna launhelga, skilst flest í dæminu. Mjólk er þá tákn um endurfæðingu Egils. Hann er að segja skiljið við óargadýrið, hann er að bjóða velkomið manneðlið, læknislistina og skáldskaparíþróttina". Einar Pálsson. Bræður himins og Egils saga (p. 6).
  11. Now are we deceived: "Speech acts count for a great deal in the sagas, as does, even more, the author’s economical use of direct speech, in which the act is made manifest. This is evident not least in the third scene, the prelude to the composition of “Sonatorrek”. The account has comic overtones that modern readers may find difficult to reconcile with Egill’s stifling, swelling grief, but here the saga-man seems to have adopted Egill’s own wry stance before old age and life’s losses." Sayers, William. Verbal Expedients and Transformative Utterances in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (p. 179).
  12. Now are we deceived: „Elle déclare mâcher des algues pour hâter son trépas. [...] Sa fille le calme en lui suggérant de composer une élégie á la mémoire de son fils. [...] Cet épisode unit le tragique et le comique, tout en témoignant d´une sagesse sur les sentiments les intimes du coeur humain.“ Torfi H. Tulinius. La saga d’Egill et l’histoire du roman (p. 150).
  13. this is milk: "Hafi Egill átt möguleika á eilífu lífi, þar sem hann var tekinn inn í samfélag kristinna manna með prímsigningunni, þá skipti máli að hann svelti sig ekki til bana, eins og hann ætlaði að gera eftir að eftirlætissonur hans Böðvar drukknaði í Borgarfirði. Þegar Þorgerður narraði Egil til að bergja af mjólkinni og stakk svo upp á því að hann semdi erfikvæði um son sinn, með þeirri afleiðingu að hann hætti við að deyja, var hún ekki aðeins að bjarga lífi hans heldur líka sál." Torfi H. Tulinius. Hjálpræði frá Egilsdætrum (p. 69).
  14. compose a funeral poem: "Geðrænar truflanir eiga sér þar ávallt rökræn tildrög, og lýsingar á ytra atferli þeirra samræmast nánar þeim klinisku myndum sem þekktar eru í geðlæknisfræðinni nú á dögum og gefa jafnframt vísbendingu um innra eðli þeirra [...]. Það er eftirtektarvert að [Þorgerður] viðhefur sams konar tilburði gagnvart Agli og nú á tímum þykja vænlegastir til árangurs í geðlækningum og eru í reyndinni forsenda þess að terapeutisk breyting eigi sér stað, þ.e. að sjúklingurinn losni við einkenni sín og verði aftur samur og jafn fyrir tilverknað meðferðarinnar." Jakob Jónasson. Aftur í aldir (pp. 27-28).
  15. he could now compose: "Es ist nicht eine im Gedanken an englische Vorbilder ausgearbeitete Elegie, sondern ein poetischer Ausdruck der Gedanken und Empfindungen Egills, wie sie ihn an jenem Tage erfüllten." Unwerth, Wolf von. Zu Egills Sonatorrek (p. 174).
  16. I will try this: "the Sonatorrek [...] gives a clearer insight into the mind of Egill than any other of his poems, showing him as an affectionate, sensitive, lonely ageing man, and not the ruffianly bully which he sometimes appears to be in the Saga." Turville-Petre, Gabriel. The Sonatorrek (p. 36).
  17. began the poem: “The prose pictures Egil as an emotional person, at some moments without any self-control […] It’s in accordance with this, that we can find an unusual amount of emotions in his poetry and this in contrary to all formal requirements that obstruct such a thing!” (Dutch text: “Het proza beeldt Egil af als een gevoelsmens, op sommige momenten zonder enige zelfbeheersing […] Het is daarmee in overeenstemming, dat men in zijn poëzie ongewoon veel gevoel aantreft en dat ondanks alle formele eisen die zoiets in de weg stonden!”) Kroesen, Jacoba M.C.. Inleiding (p. XX).
  18. Egill began the poem: "While reading Egill’s poem on the loss of his sons, we are filled with admiration and wonder. Its light shines like the Northern Lights, the Aurora Borealis. It springs from a hidden source, its deep-glowing colours fanning out over the expanse of heaven, but displaying the grandeur of its radiance only in the twilight of the day." Bouman, Ari C. Egill Skallagrímsson‘s Poem Sonatorrek (p. 40).
  19. this is the beginning: "The formative pressures on the canon of skaldic poetry are exerted by the centrality of the concept of lyric to several disparate cultural endeavours. One (...) is the historicist attempt to map an evolution of consciousness in Western cultures using changes in literary forms. Another is a Romantic commitment to a poetic of subjective expression: by reading Sonatorrek, we can see into Egill's soul. Lyric poems are also, of course, the preferred raw material for the modus operandi of close reading leading to 'literary appreciation' promulgated by the major literary critical movement of the mid-twentieth century, the New Criticism. (...) Sonatorrek 's status as the canonical 'classic' of the skaldic lyric, then, seems secures enough." Heslop, K. S.. Sonatorrek and the Myth of Skaldic Lyric (p. 158).
  20. much doth it task me: "Þyki ástæða til að vefengja að Egill hafi kveðið Sonatorrek, þá væri enginn maður líklegri til að hafa "sett sig í spor Egils" en Snorri Sturluson, svo framarlega sem hann hefir verið höfundur Egils sögu" Bjarni Einarsson. Skáldið í Reykjaholti (p. 39).
  21. My tongue to move: "Sonattorek itself opens with a complaint about the difficulty of it’s erection [...] and although there is no question of an overt sexual or marital meaning here, the wider system of tongue/sword/penis correspondences invites us to just such associations, which serve in turn to confirm our sense that this poem stems from a very point very far down gender scale – a point at which sword and penis have given away to the tongue, and even the tongue may not be up to the task" Clover, Carol J.. Regardless of sex (p. 16).
  22. The breath of song: "Úr þessum einföldu orðum má, að minni hyggju lesa mikla gamansemi: Þetta gat þó Björgólfur gamli gert, en það mátti ekki tæpara standa!" Sveinbjörn Egilsson. Bókmentasaga Íslendínga (p.179, footnote nr. 2).
  23. drawn not lightly: „So aufgefaßt bildet die Strophe in ihrem Aufbau eine schöne logische Einheit: Der Dichter geht von den rein physischen Hemmungen seines Schmerzes allmählich auf die geistige Arbeit des dichterischen Schaffens über.“ de Vries, Jan. Die erste Strophe von Egils Sonatorrek (p. 301).
  24. thought's dwelling: "Thus there is made an analogy between drawing the "theft of Óðinn" from the breast and the mythic stealing of the mead. The use of fylgsni "hiding place" as the source of "Viðurs þýfi" suggests the myth in itself, but because fylgsni belongs to a larger unit "hugar fylgsni" this remains a subordinate, though intensifying, association". Stevens, John. The Mead of Poetry: Myth and Metaphor (p. ??).
  25. flows but hardly: "Það er eftirtektarvert, að Egill endurtekur í tveim fyrstu vísunum sömu hugsunina fimm sinnum með breyttum orðum. Slík þráhugsun er eitt af aðaleinkennum þungrar sorgar." Guðmundur Finnbogason. Um nokkrar vísur Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 162).
  26. Goodly treasure: „The Sonatorrek, perhaps better than any other poem, illustrates the religious outlook of a man of Egill¬‘s time – even though he was a far from ordinary man. In its twenty-five strophes the Sonatorrek contains about twenty allusions to gods or myths, some of which are obscure to us. [...] Poetry, for pagans, was sacred, and in the Sonatorrek Egill several times alludes to the story of its origin. It is the joyful find of Frigg‘s kinsmen, brought long ago from the world of giants (2); it is the theft of Óðinn (1), and Óðinn‘s gift to Egill (24.)“ Turville-Petre, Gabriel. Egill Skalla-Grímsson (pp. 25-26).
  27. From Giant-land of yore: "Het parallellisme met de eerder besproken roof van de dichtermede door Óðinn uit het Reuzenland ligt voor de hand (...). Dat Egill inderdaad aan dit goddelijk exempel denkt, blijkt al dadelijk uit de kenningen in zijn twee aanvangsstrofen, waar hij onmiddellijk na elkaar zijn kunst omschrijft als 'Óðin’s roof' en als 'het feestgelag van Frigg’s verwanten'." Hamel, A. G. van. Ijslands Odinsgeloof (p. 175).
  28. O'erborne by billows: "So ist nun der Raum gegeben, daß die 3. Strophe mit neuem Einsatz das Thema selbst in Angriff nimmt: es ist nicht möglich, daß der 1. Helming noch auf etwas völlig anderes zielt, und darauf mit dem 2. Helming der Hauptteil des Gedichts den Anfang nähme." Wolff-Marburg, Ludwig. Eddisch-Skaldische Blütenlese (p. 106).
  29. my kindred: "ruft der alte Egil in v 4 aus: 'Mein geschlecht steht am ende wie die sturmgefällten baumäste', so liegt darin das zornige bekenntnis, dass Thorstein als trost und ersatz für die toten brüder völlig versagte und somit als sohn überhaupt nicht mehr für den vater in betracht kam." Niedner, Felix. Egils Sonatorrek (p. 221).
  30. near to their end: "Sonatorrek er fyrsta íslenzka kvæðið og Egill fyrsti Íslendingurinn að því leyti, að hjá honum kemur fyrst skýrt fram sú sundurgreining sálarlífsins, sem skapaðist við flutning Íslendinga vestur um haf og varð skilyrði andlegra afreka þeirra, sem þeir unnu fram yfir Norðmenn." Sigurður Nordal. Átrúnaður Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 164).
  31. Ev'n as forest-saplings: "Mjer hefur komið til hugar, að hjer ætti að lesa hilmir." Björn M. Ólsen. Um vísu í Sonatorreki (p. 134).
  32. Felled or tempest-strown: “Tones of a similar exaggerated isolation may be autible in the Wife’s Lament and the Wanderer, and Egill in Sonatorrek, st. 4, is certainly exaggerating with “...my line is at its end like the withered stump of the forest maple.“ For Egill had a surviving son as well as daughters and grandchildren.“ Harris, Joseph. Elegy in Old English and Old Norse (pp. 52-53).
  33. Sad store hath memory For minstrel skill, A wood to bloom leafy With words of song : "Ekki verður betur sé en að kenningin í síðari helmingi erindisins sé ættuð úr Biblíunni, nánar tiltekið úr 17. kafla Fjórðu Mósebókar. Þar segir frá því að kurr sé komin í Ísraelsþjóð en á skipar Yahve Móse að láta höfuð hverrar ættkvíslanna tólf útbúa staf og rista á hann nafn sitt. Stafirnir skulu bornir inn í samfundartjaldið og lagðir fyrir framan sáttmálann. Næsta dag kemur Móses inn í tjaldið og finnur að stafur Aarons hefur laufgast og m.a.s. borið ávöxt. Hann ber það út úr tjaldinu og sýnir það lýðnum. [...] Þegar haft er í huga að sáttmálatjaldið er forveri musterisins, þá er það augljóst að kenningin í Sonatorreki væri óhugsandi nema að skáldið hafi þekkt þessa sögu úr Biblíunni," Torfi H. Tulinius. Egla og Biblían (p. 134).
  34. Cut hath the billow The cord of my kin,: " Alla æfi hefur hann haldið hlut sínum við hvern sem var að skifta, því hann hefur jafnan getað hefnt sín, rekið harma sinna og haldið þannig uppi jöfnuði í viðskiptum sínum við aðra. En svo koma náttúruöflin og ræna hann. Við þeim má hann ekki. Sjúkdómur tekur einn son hans, sjórinn annan. Hann litast um og finst hann vera einmana. Honum finst hann standa einn, eins og helbarin hrísla, honum finst eins og lifandi kvistur sé slitinn af ættstofninum, viðkvæmustu taugar sjálfs hans skornar sundur " Guðmundur Finnbogason. Egill Skallagrímsson (pp. 130-31).
  35. strand of my own: "Egill’s sense that an outrageous wrong has been committed against him personally, emphasised by ‘minnar ættar’ and ‘sjọlfum mér’, brings the desire for a counter attack: the same concern with justice and repayment which took such a positive form in Arinbjarnakviða here demands revenge" Larrington, Carolyne. Egill‘s longer Poems: Arinbjarnarkviða and Sonatorrek (p. 58).
  36. So stout and strong: "Now (in 7) the simple force of waves modulates toward the surgical as the sea appears in person: the sea-goddess ‘Rán has amputated me of loving friends’; ‘the sea has slashed the bonds of my family, a strong strand of me myself'". Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (p. 156).
  37. if sword could venge: "In my dissertation I maintain that Egil Skallagrimsson's poem from the 10th century, Sonatorrek, can throw light on the origin of the "Eddic Elegies", as this poem like these "elegies" has grief as its main theme and shares several of the specific thematic and characteristics of the "Eddic elegies" Guðrúnarhvöt and Guðrúnarqviða I … Egil presents his son's death by drowning as a manslaughter in a heroic poem, and he reacts to the 'manslaughter' with both grief and revengeful stories." Sävborg, Daniel. Beowulf and Sonatorrek are genuine enough (p. 48).
  38. Evil times would wait / Ægir, ocean-god: "Egil doesn't comfort himself with a yelding "the Lord has given, the Lord has taken", but he wishes to raise his sword against the superior powers themselves." Franz, L. Egils ‘Sonatorrek’ und die Inschrift von Rök (p. 4)
  39. Battling would I go: "Vielmehr stellt Egil die exorbitante Idee, sich für den Ertrinkungstod seines Sohnes an den Göttern zu rächen, als spontane Gefühlsaufwallung dar, die bald schon dem Eingeständnis der Ohnmacht und Gebrechlichkeit weicht. Gleichwohl beherrscht die Idee der Fehde und des Rechtsstreits mit den Göttern das ganze Gedicht. [...] Nichts im Sonatorrek erinnert, wie gesagt, an irgendeines der anderen Gedichte, die man zur gemeingermanischen Elegiengattung zählen will." See, Klaus von. Das Phantom einer altgermanischen Elegiendichtung (p. 93)
  40. much bereaved: "„His assertion of his inability to fight against the sea, which would of course be the same for any man, young or old, modulates into an expression of the helplessness of old age.“ Finlay, Alison. Elegy and Old Age in Egil’s Saga (p. ??).
  41. In my son was waxing The stuff and the strength : " Böðvar sonur Egils var, eins og Baldur, saklaus og hvers manns hugljúfi. Einkunn Baldurs, „hin góði“, kemur hins vegar einungis fram sem neikvæður úrdráttur – stílbragð sem virðist einkenni á skáldskap Egils." Harris, Joseph. Goðsögn sem hjálp til að lifa af í Sonatorreki (p. 59).
  42. Our northern snows: "elgjar getur með engu móti hjer táknað dýrið elgr, heldur sama sem krap, hálfbræddur snjór. ... Gálgi er trje, sem eitthvað er hengt á, þótt það sje haft í fornmálinu um það trje eitt, sem menn eru hengdir í. elgjar gálgi er þá sá gálgi, sem snjór hangir á, og það verður Ísland". Halldór Kr. Friðriksson. Egils saga (p. 373).
  43. Odin, mighty monarch: "In Sonatorrek (96 lines) the number of such lines [i.e. ending in a monosyllabic verb] is very small; stað occurs twice, hrör once, while a double consonant follows on a short vowel in the doubtful word þokk." Craigie, William A.. On some Points in Skaldic Metre (p. 348).
  44. First from my home / Swept off a son : " At this point the poem changes subject. The actual memorial poem to Böðvarr has come to an end. St. 20 deals with the poet’s son who died on a sick bed. He was innocent and careful in his choice of words. For the next four strophes, Óðinn takes a central position. In st. 21, the poet states that he still remembers when Óðinn took his son to himself in the home of the gods. There is no obvious grief in this strophe. In direct continuation of this (st. 22), the poet describes the good relationship he has had with Óðinn since taking up steadfast belief in this god who broke his friendship with Þórr. The poet makes sacrifices to Óðinn, the god of poetry, not because the poet is by nature a great man for sacrifices, but rather because Óðinn offers spiritual consolation if one turns to him wholeheartedly (st. 23)." Jón Hnefill Aðalsteinsson. Religious Ideas in Sonatorrek (p. 175).
  45. A branch so fair: "This lack of equivalence between loss and compensation may be the association linking to st. 17 which, as we have seen, ironically cites an ancient proverb coined at a time when rebirth was a real possibility. A reprise (in 18a) of the theme of isolation, even in a time of peace, is linked, apparently causally, to the earlier filial death (18b), or so I believe; and the difficult earlier filial death (18b), or so I believe; and the difficult earlier st. 19 seems to be Egill’s reaffirmation of hostility from the gods ever since — st. 20 — Gunnar, the fair-spoken, died of a fever." Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (p. 157).
  46. once bare I goodwill: "Egill's profound poem also comprises ... a kind of minority report, a set of mythological allusions with an undermining and unsettling effect. These references to a group of Odinic stories outside the Baldr complex but somehow related to it seem to undercut or even deconstruct the official mythology by concerning themselves with problems that are papered or denied in the central Baldr myths ... The major stories from this group will be immediately recalled by the names of their long-lived protagonists, all sacrificers or would-be-sacrifices of sons or near-kinsmen: King Aun, King Haraldr hilditǫnn, and Strakaðr the Old. I will argue that Egill takes on the persona of each in the course of his poem." Harris, Joseph. Sacrifice and Guilt in Sonatorrek (pp. 174-75).
  47. The car-borne god, Broke faith and friendship: "Afstaða höfundar Sonatorreks til Óðins og efnisskipan kvæðisins í heild verður því óneytanlega mun skiljanlegri ef gert er ráð fyrir því að Óðinn hafi ekki brugðist sjálfur heldur slitið vináttu skáldsins við Þór eins og hér framar var lesið úr lagfærðum texta 22. erindis." Jón Hnefill Aðalsteinsson. Trúarhugmyndir í Sonatorreki (p. 119).
  48. I give no more: “På Odin är Egill uppenbarligen besviken, för honom hade Egill litat på. Odin har ju gett honom den gåva som är värdefullare än andra: skaldekonsten. Egils reaktion får förstås mot bakgrund av den föreställningsvärld som var hans. För trollkarlen Egill är det en allt överskuggande angelägenhet att med alla medel få makterna på sin sida. När någon olycka drabbar honom är det ett tecken på att hans magiska kraft är otillräcklig.” Ralph, Bo. Om tilkomsten av Sonatorrek (p. 163).
  49. friend of Mimir: "In Egil's greatest poem 'Lament for My Sons' […] he speaks of the double-face of his god. As rune-master and lord of poetry, Odin has given Egil the power of words; as lord of poetry, Odin has taken away his two sons. Yet it is the gift of poetry which makes the loss bearable, giving Egil the power to cope with his suffering by expressing it." Hermann Pálsson, Paul Edwards. Introduction (p. 11).
  50. poesy faultless: "niðurstaða þess [kvæðisins] er sú að í stóru böli, þegar ekki fæst hjálp leingur af máttarvöldum, þá sé athvarf í skáldskap." Halldór Laxness. Egill Skallagrímsson og sjónvarpið (p. 118).
  51. If all boons I tell: "Since Egill does not sacrifice to Odin because he is eager to, we can say he does sacrifice and does sacrifice and has sacrificed, but unwillingly. These unwilling sacrifices must be the bǫl ‘harms’ for which he has received boetr ‘compensations’ (in st. 23)." Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (p. 165).
  52. The war-god skilful: "Wat de gedachtenis der mythen betreft, een middel om deze in gecondenseerde vorm steeds met zich te dragen, heeft de skald in zijn kenningen, de dichterlijke omschrijvingen van geijkte vorm, die het hem mogelijk maken de dingen niet door hun prozaische naam, maar door een samenstel van grondwoord en bepalingen aan te duiden, dat dikwijls alleen door de kennis van een mythe verstaanbaar wordt." Hamel, A. G. van. Ijslands Odinsgeloof (p. 171).
  53. Gave poesy: „Í næstefsta erindi Sonatorreks drepur Egill á tvær gjafir, sem hann hafði þegið að Óðni: „vammi firrða íþrótt“ (skáldskapar) og „það geð er eg gerði mér vísa fjendur að vélöndum“. Þessi orð skáldsins gefa tilefni til ýmissa hugleiðinga um þær guðlegu gjafir, sem getið er annars staðar í fornum bókmenntum vorum“. Hermann Pálsson. Tveir þættir um Egils sögu (p. 80).
  54. Gave poesy faultless: "Að skáldskapurinn skuli sagður vera vammi firrður, bendir til samanburðar milli hans og annars athæfis, t.d. þess að vera hermaður, hirðmaður eða höfðingi. Ólíkt þessum sviðum er svið skáldskaparins þess eðlis að sá sem haslar sér þar völl þarf ekki að togast á við aðra um þau gæði sem í boði eru á sviðinu. Á þessu sviði er hann laus undan hættum, kvöðum og andstæðum kröfum hinna sviðanna. Því er sá auður sem skáldskapurinn færir manni „sannur“." Torfi H. Tulinius. Saga og samfélag (p. 163).
  55. Hard am I beset: "Of this poem and others like it in the skaldic corpus it may be said that there are in fact two “topics,” an ostensible one, and the poet’s own perception of the ostensible one, and that the latter may on occasion so overshadow the former that it tends to become the poem’s main subject." Clover, Carol. Scaldic Sensibility (p. 65).
  56. good welcome: "„Góður vilji“ er mjög upprunalegt hugtak í kristindómi, í senn guðfræðilegt og siðfræðilegt. [...] Skilyrði fyrir hjálpræði er að mennirnir séu með góðan vilja: blessun guðs er yfir manni sem hefur góðan vilja.; fyrir bragðið bíður hann „glaður og óhryggur“ hvers sem að höndum ber." Halldór Laxness. Nokkrir hnýsilegir staðir í fornkvæðum (p. 22).
  57. death-blow bide: "Í ... niðurlagserindi Sonatorreks, vega salt, ef svo má segja, útsynningurinn og hinn heiðni boðskapur um kjark og lífsgleði – líkt og böl og bölva bætur í vísunum næst á undan. Þannig tekst skáldinu – í lok kvæðisins – „at létta upp pundaraskaptinu“." Ólafur M. Ólafsson. Sonatorrek (p. 187).
  58. began to cheer up: „Grief, [Egill] said, made it hard for him to write. Grief did not cause him to write, but he wrote despite grief. The two are opposed. By making his poem Egill conquered his grief: the gift of poesy was “high amends” for his loss, a “fault-free unfailing skill” through which he rendered himself able to meet his fate. The crystallization of emotional experience in an intellectual form enables the poet to transcend that experience.“ Bolton, W.F. The Old Icelandic Dróttkvætt (p. 284-85).
  59. composing of the poem: "[T]he composer of Egils saga adopts a stronger interest in the poet’s production of verse in a personalised context than in his composition of court poetry for foreign rulers”.Clunies Ross, Margaret. The Skald Sagas as a Genre (p. 37).
  60. when the poem was complete: "In the saga, as well as in Ibsen’s drama [Hærmændene på Helgeland], the inclusion of the poem is not purely ornamental: it is thanks to it indeed that the character-author re-engages in action and is able to contribute to the narration again." Ferrari, Fulvio. Attraverso gli specchi della riscrittura (p. 431).
  61. and took his place in the high-seat: ""Sønnetabet" giver den bedst ønskelige karakteristik af ham netop som familieoverhovedet, hvorledes han følte sit eget personlige liv ligefrem afhænge af ættens." Friðrik Á. Brekkan. Lidt om Egil Skallagrimssons personlighed (p. 117).
  62. Loss of Sons: „Mjer þykir líklegt, að Egill hafi myndað orðið torrek við þetta tækifæri. Síðar hefur merking þess færzt nokkuð til, en þó á eðlilegan hátt (torsótt hefnd, torbætt tjón, þungbær missir)“ Árni Pálsson. Sonatorrek (p. 153).
  63. Loss of Sons: "Nowhere is this burning love for Óðinn expressed more clearly than it is in the Sonatorrek, in which Egill rebukes his 'patron', who has deserted him and deprived him of his sons. We cannot say that other Icelandic poets worshipped Óðinn as passionately as Egill did, but it is plain that he filled an honourable place in their conceptions of the divine world." Turville-Petre, Gabriel. The Cult of Óðinn in Iceland (p. 9).
  64. after he settled down here in Iceland: "The change (of behaviour) seems to have been deliberate; Egill has lost none of his warrior capabilities but now lives in a society which he feels comfortable. He is successful in Iceland because he abandons the traits of the dark figure that enabled him to assert himself against monarchical authority abroad, but which have no place in Iceland (…), a society of freemen." Byock, Jesse L.. Egill Skallagrímsson. The Dark Figure as Survivor in an Icelandic Saga (p. 158).
  65. he kings there deemed they had against him: "The entire passage appears to be an attempt to tidy up some loose ends, parts of the Egill-tradition about which an audience might expect the narrator to have details, and which he takes special care to point out that he does not have." Bell, L. Michael. Oral Allusion in Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar (pp. 53-54).
  66. Egil composed a poem: "Strophen [...], deren Echtheit mir ziemlich sicher erscheint[:] An erster Stelle die Strophen, die den Freund Arinbjǫrn preisen, namentlich Str. 27, die dieselbe Umschreibung des Namens erhält, wie die Arinbjarnarkviða [...]." Vries, Jan de. Altnordische Literaturgeschichte (p. 139).
  67. poem about Arinbjorn: "[V]ísurnar um Arinbjörn mynda hápunkt verksins. Það sem eftir lifir sögunnar er ekkert annað en nauðsynleg sögulok." Baldur Hafstað. Konungsmenn í kreppu og vinátta í Egils sögu (p. 97)
  68. this is the beginning: "Arinbjarnarkviða stendur aðeins í Möðruvallabók. Það vekur grun um að sagan sé tilefni þessa kveðskapar, en kveðskapurinn ekki tilefni sögunnar eins og gjarnan er talið." Sveinbjörn Rafnsson. Sagnastef í íslenskri menningarsögu (p. 93).
  69. For generous prince: "Cela dit, que Snorri Sturluson ait « composé » Egla n’a rien d’invraissemblable : il descendait d’Egill ; à partir de 1201, il vécut à Borg comme Egill près de trois siècles plus tôt ; comme lui, il est des Mýrarmenn et connaît parfaitement toutes les traditions du Borgarfjördr. En somme, il est chez lui là où a grandi et vécu longtemps l’auteur de l’Arinbjarnarkvida." Boyer, Régis. Notice (p. 1509).
  70. Swift praise I find: "Egil boasts about […] being able to compose swiftly. Ease and swiftness, not least the originality of the artistic creation, are tokens of the high-rank poet. Egil’s stanza is never […] circumscribed or tendentially circular [… but] elastic and movable. The discourse develops in a cascade from the thread of semantic- and sound-associations, while being hastened by the enjambements and barely restrained by reservations and doubts. Egil’s poems move in time, they let air filter in between [the verses] and display their previous and later stage, their solutions and their premises." Koch, Ludovica. Gli scaldi (pp. 111-12).
  71. courts I of monarchs: "The general themes of the poem are addressed already in the first two verses: the nature of nobility, later exemplified by Arinbjọrn, consisting in generosity, ‘mildinga’ (generous lords) 2.6, and courage, ‘jọfurs dáðum’ (a lord’s great deeds) 1.6, and their opposites: ‘gløggvinga’ (misers) 1.4, and skrọkberọndum’ (lying boasters) 2.2." Larrington, Carolyne. Egill‘s longer Poems: Arinbjarnarkviða and Sonatorrek (p. 51).
  72. As fiery serpent: „Í 5. vísu Arinbjarnarkviðu er nýgerving þar sem hinum ógnvænlegu augum Eiríks blóðaxar er lýst. Í Húsdrápu Úlfs Uggasonar, sem varðveitt er í Snorra-Eddu, birtist sama nýgerving“ Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (p. 21).
  73. hood-knoll: "[Í þessari vísu] líkir Egill höfði sínu við staup sem hann þiggur fyrir mjöð Óðins. Þetta minnir á vísu Braga Boddasonar þar sem hann er eins og Egill að rifja upp þann atburð er hann þá höfuð sitt fyrir skáldskap." Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (p. 22).
  74. hood-knoll: "Men ordet kan också betyda ‘stop, dryckesbägare’. Följaktigen: Egill utskänker skaldemjödet ur huvudets stop och får i gengäld behålla detta stop! Det är en sinnrik tolkning, som förefaller att harmoniera ganska väl med de norröna skaldernas sinne för det komplicerade och dubbelbottnade". Hallberg, Peter. Den fornisländska poesien (p. 112).
  75. Of my beetling brows: "Arinbjarnarkviða staðfestir [hér] að Egill sé dökkhærður. Ófá eru þau íslensk skáld sem sögð eru dökkhærð, sbr. hið algenga skáldaviðurnefni „svarti“ ... Hefðin hefur gert skáldin dökk." Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (p. 26).
  76. poem of praise: "... the Old Norse coumpound hǫfuðlausn, "head ransom or head redemption", (...) stresses no the redemption of a threatened person's whole body or his life, but of his head as a symbol of his person. In the case of a poet such as Egil the emphasis upon the head, and upon the mouth in particular, is linked to the importance of those parts as conduits for poetry, conventionally represented in skaldic verse, particularly through kennings, as an intoxicating liquid, a mead or ale, the gift of the god Odin, whoses mythic regurgitation of this precious liquid functioned as the prototypical act of poetic composition to which all skalds aspired." Clunies Ross, Margaret. Self-description in Egil’s Poetry (p. 79).
  77. The gift: "The comic effect of this catalogue of treasures climaxes in the assertion that "that gift" ("sú gjǫf") was better than gold. It is possible that these three stanzas of self-description are a variation on another literary topos which is to be found in some descriptions of beautiful women. The topos, which may well be a literary universal, involves enumerating the monetary value of specific body parts of the woman and of her whole person. In Kormak's saga, two of Kormak's lausavísur (7 and 8: Sveinsson 1939, 212-13) discuss Stengerd's physical virtues in these terms." Clunies Ross, Margaret. Self-description in Egil’s Poetry (p. 81).
  78. the frowning steep: "The startling image of poetry not as liquid but as leafy timber appears to be reinforced in the first helming of stanza 15 of Arinbjarnarkviða, where Egill says that Arinbjörn’s deeds can be “easily polished (or smoothed) by the voice-plane” (erum auðskæf/ ómunlokri)." Clover, Carol. Scaldic Sensibility (p. 76).
  79. 'Above his ears : "Hér hefur skáldið leitt saman tvö hugtök, spannir og heyrn, og skapað með því þriðja hugtakið, eyru. Eyrun eru kölluð spannir, en kennd til heyrnar. Slíkt er kallað að kenna, en fyrirbrigðið sjálft kenning, og er hún kjarni skáldamálsins." Ólafur M. Ólafsson. Skáldamál (p. 117).
  80. proud pile: "[I]n the concluding stanza Egill returns to the idea of language as a signal tower, a beacon on a high sea-cliff like Beowulf’s arrow ... Now Egill had not read Horace’s “monumentum aere perennius”; in fact there is no reason to believe that Egill had read anyone who did not write in runes, but the fame of Arinbjörn is here made equivalent to a monument of stone. And it is hard not to think of the conjunction of stone monument, written language, and fame that we know from some of the Swedish runestones." Harris, Joseph. Romancing the Rune (pp. 136-37).
  81. stand unbroken: "Arinbjarnarkviða er endurminning skálds um stórfeinglega ævi, sem vitjar hans í elli, með ástríðufullum viðbrögðum við mönnum konúngum vinum og guðum; henni lýkur með erindi sem gerir tímasetníngar að aukaatriði eða réttara sagt lyftir yrkisefninu upp í eilífan tíma." Halldór Laxness. Egill Skallagrímsson og sjónvarpið (p. 120).

Kafli 80

Ólafur fékk Þorgerðar

Ólafur hét maður, son Höskulds Dala-Kollssonar og son Melkorku dóttur Mýrkjartans Írakonungs. Ólafur bjó í Hjarðarholti í Laxárdal vestur í Breiðafjarðardölum. Ólafur var stórauðigur að fé. Hann var þeirra manna fríðastur sýnum er þá voru á Íslandi. Hann var skörungur mikill.

Ólafur bað Þorgerðar dóttur Egils. Þorgerður var væn kona og kvenna mest, vitur og heldur skapstór en hversdaglega kyrrlát. Egill kunni öll deili á Ólafi og vissi að það gjaforð var göfugt og fyrir því var Þorgerður gift Ólafi. Fór hún til bús með honum í Hjarðarholt. Þeirra börn voru þau Kjartan, Þorbergur, Halldór, Steindór, Þuríður, Þorbjörg, Bergþóra. Hana átti Þórhallur goði Oddason. Þorbjörgu átti fyrr Ásgeir Knattarson en síðar Vermundur Þorgrímsson. Þuríði átti Guðmundur Sölmundarson. Voru þeirra synir Hallur og Víga-Barði.

Össur Eyvindarson bróðir Þórodds í Ölfusi fékk Beru dóttur Egils.

Böðvar son Egils var þá frumvaxta. Hann var hinn efnilegasti maður, fríður sýnum, mikill og sterkur svo sem verið hafði Egill eða Þórólfur á hans aldri. Egill unni honum mikið. Var Böðvar og elskur að honum.

Það var eitt sumar að skip var í Hvítá og var þar mikil kaupstefna. Hafði Egill þar keypt við margan og lét flytja heim á skipi. Fóru húskarlar og höfðu skip áttært er Egill átti. Það var þá eitt sinn að Böðvar beiddist að fara með þeim og þeir veittu honum það. Fór hann þá inn á Völlu með húskörlum. Þeir voru sex saman á áttæru skipi. Og er þeir skyldu út fara þá var flæðurin síð dags og er þeir urðu hennar að bíða þá fóru þeir um kveldið síð. Þá hljóp á útsynningur steinóði en þar gekk í móti útfallsstraumur. Gerði þá stórt á firðinum sem þar kann oft verða. Lauk þar svo að skipið kafði undir þeim og týndust þeir allir. En eftir um daginn skaut upp líkunum. Kom lík Böðvars inn í Einarsnes en sum komu fyrir sunnan fjörðinn og rak þangað skipið. Fannst það inn við Reykjarhamar.

Þann dag spurði Egill þessi tíðindi og þegar reið hann að leita líkanna. Hann fann rétt lík Böðvars. Tók hann það upp og setti í kné sér og reið með út í Digranes til haugs Skalla-Gríms.[1] Hann lét þá opna hauginn og lagði Böðvar þar niður hjá Skalla-Grími. Var síðan aftur lokinn haugurinn og var eigi fyrr lokið en um dagsetursskeið. Eftir það reið Egill heim til Borgar og er hann kom heim þá gekk hann þegar til lokrekkju þeirrar er hann var vanur að sofa í. Hann lagðist niður og skaut fyrir loku.[2] Engi þorði að krefja hann máls.

En svo er sagt, þá er þeir settu Böðvar niður, að Egill var búinn, hosan var strengd fast að beini. Hann hafði fustanskyrtil rauðan, þröngvan upphlutinn og lás að síðu. En það er sögn manna að hann þrútnaði svo[3] að kyrtillinn rifnaði af honum og svo hosurnar.

En eftir um daginn lét Egill ekki upp lokrekkjuna. Hann hafði þá og engan mat né drykk. Lá hann þar þann dag og nóttina eftir. Engi maður þorði að mæla við hann.

En hinn þriðja morgun þegar er lýsti þá lét Ásgerður skjóta hesti undir mann, reið sá sem ákaflegast vestur í Hjarðarholt, og lét segja Þorgerði þessi tíðindi öll saman og var það um nónskeið er hann kom þar. Hann sagði og það með að Ásgerður hafði sent henni orð að koma sem fyrst suður til Borgar.

Þorgerður lét þegar söðla sér hest og fylgdu henni tveir menn. Riðu þau um kveldið og nóttina til þess er þau komu til Borgar. Gekk Þorgerður þegar inn í eldahús. Ásgerður heilsaði henni og spurði hvort þau hefðu náttverð etið.

Þorgerður segir hátt: „Engvan hefi eg náttverð haft og engan mun eg fyrr en að Freyju. Kann eg mér eigi betri ráð en faðir minn. Vil eg ekki lifa eftir föður minn og bróður.“

Hún gekk að lokhvílunni og kallaði: „Faðir, lúk upp hurðunni, vil eg að við förum eina leið bæði.“

Egill spretti frá lokunni. Gekk Þorgerður upp í hvílugólfið og lét loku fyrir hurðina. Lagðist hún niður í aðra rekkju er þar var.

Þá mælti Egill: „Vel gerðir þú dóttir er þú vilt fylgja föður þínum. Mikla ást hefir þú sýnt við mig. Hver von er að eg muni lifa vilja við harm þenna?“[4]

Síðan þögðu þau um hríð.

Þá mælti Egill: „Hvað er nú dóttir, tyggur þú nú nokkuð?“

„Tygg eg söl,“[5][6] segir hún, „því að eg ætla að mér muni þá verra en áður. Ætla eg ella að eg muni of lengi lifa.“

„Er það illt manni?“ segir Egill.

„Allillt,“ segir hún, „viltu eta?“[7]

„Hvað mun varða?“ segir hann.

En stundu síðar kallaði hún og bað gefa sér drekka. Síðan var henni gefið vatn að drekka.

Þá mælti Egill: „Slíkt gerir að er sölin etur,[8] þyrstir æ þess að meir.“[9]

„Viltu drekka faðir?“[10] segir hún.

Hann tók við og svalg stórum og var það í dýrshorni.

Þá mælti Þorgerður: „Nú erum við vélt.[11][12] Þetta er mjólk.“[13]

Þá beit Egill skarð úr horninu, allt það er tennur tóku, og kastaði horninu síðan.

Þá mælti Þorgerður: „Hvað skulum við nú til ráðs taka? Lokið er nú þessi ætlan. Nú vildi eg faðir að við lengdum líf okkart svo að þú mættir yrkja erfikvæði[14] eftir Böðvar en eg mun rísta á kefli, en síðan deyjum við ef okkur sýnist. Seint ætla eg Þorstein son þinn yrkja kvæðið eftir Böðvar en það hlýðir eigi að hann sé eigi erfður því að eigi ætla eg okkur sitja að drykkjunni þeirri að hann er erfður.“

Egill segir að það var þá óvænt að hann mundi þá yrkja mega[15] þótt hann leitaði við „en freista má eg þess,“[16] segir hann.

Egill hafði þá átt son er Gunnar hét og hafði sá og andast litlu áður.

Og er þetta upphaf kvæðis:[17][18][19]

1.
Mjök erum tregt[20]
tungu að hræra[21]
eða loftvægi
ljóðpundara.[22]
Era nú vænlegt
um Viðris þýfi
né hógdrægt[23]
úr hugar fylgsni.[24]

2.
Era andþeystr[25]
því að ekki veldr
höfuglegr,
úr hyggju stað
fagnafundr[26]
Þriggja niðja,
ár borinn
úr jötunheimum,[27]

3.
Lastalaus
er lifnaði[28]
á Nökkvers
nökkva bragi.
Jötuns háls
undir flota
Náins niðr
fyr naustdurum.

4.
Því að ætt mín[29]
á enda stendr,[30]
sem hræbarnir[31]
hlynnar marka.[32]
Era karskr maðr
sá er köggla ber
frænda hrörs
af fletjum niðr.

5.
Þó mun ég mitt
og móður hrör
föður fall
fyrst um telja.
Það ber ég út
úr orðhofi
mærðar timbur
máli laufgað.[33]

6.
Grimmt varum hlið
það er hrönn um braut
föður míns
á frændgarði.
Veit ég ófullt
og opið standa
sonar skarð
er mér sjár um vann.

7.
Mjög hefr Rán
ryskt um mig.
Er ég ofsnauðr
að ástvinum.
Sleit mar bönd
minnar ættar,[34]
... þátt
af sjálfum mér.[35][36]

8.
Veistu um þá sök
sverði of rækag, [37]
var ölsmiðr
allra tíma.
Hroða vogs bræðr,
ef vega mættag,
færi ég andvígr[38]
Ægis mani.[39]

9.
En ég ekki
eiga þóttumst
sakar afl
við súðs bana
því að alþjóð
fyr augum verðr
gamals þegns
gengileysi.

10.
Mig hefr mar
miklu ræntan,[40]
grimmt er fall
frænda að telja,
síðan er minn
á munvega
ættar skjöldr
aflífi hvarf.

11.
Veit ég það sjálfr
að í syni mínum
vara ills þegns
efni vaxið[41]
ef sá randviðr
röskvask næði
uns her-Gauts
hendr of tæki.

12.
Æ lét flest
það er faðir mælti
þótt öll þjóð
annað segði,
mér upp hélt
of verbergi
og mitt afl
mest um studdi.

13.
Oft kemr mér
mána bjarnar
í byrvind
bræðraleysi.
Hyggjumst um
er hildr þróast,
nýsumst hins
og hygg að því

14.
hver mér hugaðr
á hlið standi
annar þegn
við óðræði.
Þarf ég hans oft
of hergjörum.
Verð ég varfleygr,
er vinir þverra.

15.
Mjög er torfyndr
sá er trúa knegum
of alþjóð
Elgjar gálga[42]
því að niflgóðr
niðja steypir
bróður hrör
við baugum selur.

16.
Finn ek það oft,
er fjár beiðir ...

17.
Það er og mælt
að enginn geti
sonar iðgjöld
nema sjálfr ali túni
þann nið
er öðrum sé
borinn maðr
í bróður stað.

18.
Erumka þokkt[43]
þjóða sinni
þótt sérhver
sátt um haldi.
Bir er Bískips
í bæ kominn,
kvonar son,
kynnis leita.

19.
En mér fannst
í föstum þokk
hrosta hilmir
á hendi stendr.
Máka eg upp
í aróar grímu,
rýnisreið,
réttri halda,

20.
síð er son minn
sóttar brími[44]
heiftuglegr
úr heimi nam,
þann eg veit
að varnaði
vamma var
við námæli. [45]

21.
Það man ég enn
er upp um hóf
í goðheim
Gauta spjalli
ættar ask
þann er óx af mér,
og kynvið
kvonar minnar.

22.
Átti ég gott[46]
við geira drottin.
Gerðumst tryggr
að trúa honum,
áðr um að
vagna runni,
sigrhöfundr,
um sleit við mig.[47]

23.
Blótka eg því
bróður Vílis,
goðs jaðar,
að eg gjarn sék.[48]
Þó hefr Míms vinur[49]
mér um fengnar
bölva bætr[50]
ef hið betra teldi. [51]

24.
Gafumst íþrótt[52]
úlfs um bági
vígi vanur[53]
vammi firrða[54]
og það geð
er eg gerði mér
vísa fjandr
af vélöndum.

25.
Nú er mér torvelt.[55]
Tveggja bága
njörva nift
á nesi stendr.
Skal eg þó glaður
með góðan vilja[56]
og óhryggr
heljar bíða.[57]

Egill tók að hressast[58] svo sem fram leið að yrkja kvæðið[59] og er lokið var kvæðinu[60] þá færði hann það Ásgerði og Þorgerði og hjónum sínum. Reis hann þá upp úr rekkju og settist í öndvegi.[61] Kvæði þetta kallaði hann Sonatorrek.[62] [63] Síðan lét Egill erfa sonu sína eftir fornri siðvenju. En er Þorgerður fór heim þá leiddi Egill hana með gjöfum í brott.

Egill bjó að Borg langa ævi og varð maður gamall en ekki er getið að hann ætti málaferli við menn hér á landi. Ekki er og sagt frá hólmgöngum hans eða vígaferlum síðan er hann staðfestist hér á Íslandi.[64]

Svo segja menn að Egill færi ekki í brott af Íslandi síðan er þetta var tíðinda er nú var áður frá sagt, og bar það mest til þess að Egill mátti ekki vera í Noregi af þeim sökum sem fyrr var frá sagt að konungar þóttust eiga við hann.[65] Bú hafði hann rausnarsamlegt því að fé skorti eigi. Hann hafði og gott skaplyndi til þess.

Hákon konungur Aðalsteinsfóstri réð fyrir Noregi langa stund en hinn efra hlut ævi hans þá komu synir Eiríks til Noregs og deildu til ríkis í Noregi við Hákon konung og áttu þeir orustu saman og hafði Hákon jafnan sigur. Hina síðustu orustu áttu þeir á Hörðalandi, í Storð á Fitjum. Þar fékk Hákon konungur sigur og þar með banasár. Eftir það tóku þeir konungdóm í Noregi Eiríkssynir.

Arinbjörn hersir var með Haraldi Eiríkssyni og gerðist ráðgjafi hans og hafði af honum veislur stórlega miklar. Var hann forstjóri fyrir liði og landvörn. Arinbjörn var hermaður mikill og sigursæll. Hann hafði að veislum Fjarðafylki.

Egill Skalla-Grímsson spurði þessi tíðindi, að konungaskipti var orðið í Noregi, og það með að Arinbjörn var þá kominn í Noreg til búa sinna og hann var þá í virðing mikilli. Þá orti Egill kvæði[66] um Arinbjörn[67] og er þetta upphaf að:[68]

1.
Emk hraðkvæðr[69]
hilmi at mæra,[70]
en glapmáll
um glöggvinga,
opinspjallr
of jöfurs dáðum,
en þagmælskr
um þjóðlygi.

2.
skaupi gnægðr
skrökberöndum,
emk vilkvæðr
um vini mína.
sótt hefi eg mörg
mildinga sjöt[71]
með grunlaust
grepps um æði.

3.
Hafði eg endr
Ynglings burar,
ríks konungs,
reiði fengna;
Dró eg djarfhött
um dökkva skör,
lét eg hersi
heim um sóttan.

4.
þar er allvaldr
und ægishjalmi,
ljóðfrömuðr,
að landi sat.
Stýrir konungr
við stirðan hug
í Jórvík
úrgum hjörvi.

5.
Vara það tunglskin
tryggt að líta,
né ógnlaust,
Eiríks bráa;
þá er ormfránn
ennimáni [72]
skein allvalds
ægigeislum.

6.
Þó eg bólstrverð
um bera þorði
maka hængs
markar dróttni,
svo að Yggs full
ýranda kom
að hvers manns
hlusta munnum.

7.
Né hamfagrt
hölðum þótti
skaldfé mitt
að skata húsum,
þá er ulfgrátt
við Yggjar miði
hattar staup[73] [74]
at hilmi þák.

8.
Við því tók,
en tiru fylgðu
sökk svartleit
síðra brúna[75]
ok sá munnr,
er mína bar
höfuðlausn[76]
fyr hilmis kné.

9.
Þar er tannfjöld
með tungu þák
ok hlertjöld
hlustum göfguð
en sú gjöf[77]
gulli betri
hróðugs konungs
um heitin var.

10.
Þar stóð mér;[78]
mörgum betri
hoddfinnendum
á hlið aðra
tryggr vinr minn,
sá er trúa knáttag,
heiðþróaðr,
hverju ráði.

11.
Arinbjörn,
er oss einn um hóf,
knía fremstr,
frá konungs fjónum,
vin þjóðans,
er vætki laug
í herskás
hilmis garði.

12.
Ok . . .
. . . stuðli lét
margframaðr
minna dáða,
sem en . . . að . . .
. . . Halfdanar
að í væri
ættar skaði.

13.
Mun eg vinþjófr
verða heitinn
ok váljúgt
at Viðris fulli,
hróðrs örverðr
ok heitrofi,
nema þess gagns
gjöld um vinnag.

14.
Nú er það sét,
hvar er setja skal
bragar fótum
brattstiginn
fyr mannfjöld,
margra sjónir,
hróðr máttigs
hersa kundar.

15.
Nú erumk auðskæf
ómunlokri
magar Þóris
mærðar efni,
vinar míns,
því að valið liggja
tvenn ok þrenn
á tungu mér.

16.
Það tel eg fyrst,
er flestr um veit
og alþjóð
eyrun sækir,
hvé mildgeðr
mönnum þótti
bjóða björn
birkis ótta.

17. Það allsheri
at undri gefst,
hvé hann urþjóð
auði gnægir,
en grjótbjörn
um gæddan hefr
Freyr ok Njörðr
af fjár afli.

18. En Hróalds
á höfuðbaðmi
auðs iðgnótt
að ölnum sifjar,
sé . . .
af vegum öllum
á vindkers
víðum botni.

19.
Hann drógseil
um eiga gat
sem hildingr
heyrnar spanna,[79]
goðum ávarðr
með gumna fjöld,
vinr véþorms,
veklinga tæs.

20.
Það hann vinnr,
er þrjóta mun
flesta menn,
þótt fé eigi.
Kveðka eg skammt
meðal skata húsa
né auðskeft
almanna spjör.

21.
Gekk maðr engi
að Arinbjarnar
úr legvers
löngum knerri
háði leiddr[80]
né heiftkviðum
með atgeirs
auðar toftir.

22.
Hinn er fégrimmr,
er í Fjörðum býr,
sá eg um dólgr
Draupnis niðja,
en sökunautr
Sónar hvinna,
hringum . . .
hoddvegandi.

23.
Hann aldrteig
um eiga gat
fjölsáinn
með friðar spjöllum
. . .

24.
Það er órétt,
ef orpið hefr
á máskeið
mörgu gagni,
rammriðin
Rökkva stóði,
vellvönuðr,
því er veitti mér.

25.
Vask árvakr,[81]
bark orð saman
með málþjóns
morgunverkum,
hlóð eg lofköst[82]
þann er lengi stendr
óbrotgjarn[83]
í bragar túni.

Tilvísanir

  1. haugs Skalla-Gríms: "Egill est responsable de la mort de son frère ainé. En plus, il refuse de donner à son père la compensation qui lui est destinée. Celui-ci décide de revenir après la mort pour se venger sur son fils cadet. Celui-ci fait pourtant de son mieux pour l’empêcher de revenir, mais il n’y arrive pas. Le fait qu’il place le cadavre de son fils noyé dans le tertre de son père indique qu’il pense que ce dernier a causé sa mort." Torfi H. Tulinius. Thykir mér gódh sonareign í thér (s. ??).
  2. Hann lagðist niður og skaut fyrir loku: "Det finns några utförliga beskrivningar av situationer där folk tycks eftersträva ett hamnskiftesliknande tillstånd. Personen i fråga går vanligen och lägger sig för sig själv. Kravet på isolering återkommer ständigt. Omgivningen instrueras att inte tilltala den som genomgår hamnskiftesproceduren." Ralph, Bo. Om tilkomsten av Sonatorrek (s. 162).
  3. hann þrútnaði svo: "Í útgáfu Finns Jónssonar af sögunni frá 1924 og í útgáfu Sigurðar Nordals frá 1933 er þegar hér er komið sögunni minnt á lýsingu Völsunga sögu á harmi Sigurðar Fáfnisbana eftir viðræðu þeirra Brynhildar, þar sem þau höfðu játað hvort öðru ást sína um leið og þau viðurkenndiu að ekki gæti annað af henni leitt en hörmung og dauða." Bjarni Einarsson. Um fáein harmræn atriði í Völsunga sögu og Egils sögu (s. 10).
  4. lifa vilja við harm þenna: „Völu-Steinn og Egill heyja helstríð af harmi eftir syni sína […] Um áhrif Landnámu á Egils sögu […] mætti spyrja hvort það sé ekki einmitt frásögnin af Völu-Steini sem haft hefur áhrif á sköpun frásagnarinnar um harm Egils. Sonatorrek hefur þá orðið til í hrifnæmum huga þess sem þekkti til Ögmundardrápu" Baldur Hafstað. HSk, Landnáma og Egils saga (s. 32).
  5. tygg eg söl: "Hér er... líklegast fyrsta tilvitnun um sölvaát í fornsögum okkar, og má ætla að sú matarvenja hafi fluttst hingað með landnámsmönnum... [Söl voru] snar þáttur í fæðuöflun landsmanna, en þó var bundið landshlutum, hélst svo gegnum aldir, en fór minnkandi og lagðist alveg af í byrjun þessarar aldar." Sigurður Samúelsson. Sjúkdómar og dánarmein íslenskra fornmanna (s. 263).
  6. söl: "Eine von Islands essbaren Tangarten, deren Beschaffenheit aber damals wohl noch nicht allgemein bekannt war." Glückselig, Anton Thormod. Skaldenlieder aus der Egils-Saga (s. 183).
  7. viltu eta: "C'est ainsi qu'elle mâche des algues pour avoir une raison de faire apporter de l'eau. [...] Mais ce n'est pas uniquement de la mort physique qu'elle le sauve. Si on considère qu'Egill est chrétien, [...], elle est aussi en train de le sauver d'un péché qui menace son salut éternel: le désespoir." Torfi H. Tulinius. Le statut théologique d‘Egill Skalla-Grímsson (s. 285).
  8. Slíkt gerir að er sölin etur: "“Den [Egils söl-replik] har en tydlig rytm, och dess allitterationer: slíkt-sölin, þrystir-þess är påtagliga. Repliken låter sig otvunget uppfatta som vers och arrangera som en helming i oklanderlig ljóðháttr med naturliga höjningar och allitterationer i både det inledande versparet och fullraden […] En replik lagd i Egils mun i form av en helming i ljóðháttr strax innan han gick att dikta sin odödliga Sonatorrek i kviðuháttr kan vara en rätt passande upptakt.” Salberger, Evert. Egils sol-replik före Sonatorrek (s. 22-23).
  9. Slíkt gerir að er sölin etur, þyrstir æ þess að meir : "Egils sǫl-replik är således en oklanderlig helming i ljóðaháttr med korsvis allitteration enligt schemat a b a b i det inledande versparet och ett självständigt stavrimssystem c c i fullraden. Dold I släktsagans prosa röjer den klar versifikatorisk konstnärlighet." Salberger, Evert. Metrisk till Egils “söl”-replik (s. 32).
  10. Viltu drekka faðir?: „Ef Egils saga hefur verið sögð í gildi, þar sem þekkt var táknmál kristinna launhelga, skilst flest í dæminu. Mjólk er þá tákn um endurfæðingu Egils. Hann er að segja skiljið við óargadýrið, hann er að bjóða velkomið manneðlið, læknislistina og skáldskaparíþróttina“. Einar Pálsson. Bræður himins og Egils saga (s. 6).
  11. Nú erum við vélt: "Speech acts count for a great deal in the sagas, as does, even more, the author’s economical use of direct speech, in which the act is made manifest. This is evident not least in the third scene, the prelude to the composition of “Sonatorrek”. The account has comic overtones that modern readers may find difficult to reconcile with Egill’s stifling, swelling grief, but here the saga-man seems to have adopted Egill’s own wry stance before old age and life’s losses." Sayers, William. Verbal Expedients and Transformative Utterances in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (s. 179).
  12. Nú erum við vélt: „Elle déclare mâcher des algues pour hâter son trépas. [...] Sa fille le calme en lui suggérant de composer une élégie á la mémoire de son fils. [...] Cet épisode unit le tragique et le comique, tout en témoignant d´une sagesse sur les sentiments les intimes du coeur humain.“ Torfi H. Tulinius. La saga d’Egill et l’histoire du roman (s. 150).
  13. þetta er mjólk: "Hafi Egill átt möguleika á eilífu lífi, þar sem hann var tekinn inn í samfélag kristinna manna með prímsigningunni, þá skipti máli að hann svelti sig ekki til bana, eins og hann ætlaði að gera eftir að eftirlætissonur hans Böðvar drukknaði í Borgarfirði. Þegar Þorgerður narraði Egil til að bergja af mjólkinni og stakk svo upp á því að hann semdi erfikvæði um son sinn, með þeirri afleiðingu að hann hætti við að deyja, var hún ekki aðeins að bjarga lífi hans heldur líka sál." Torfi H. Tulinius. Hjálpræði frá Egilsdætrum (s. 69).
  14. yrkja erfikvæði: „Geðrænar truflanir eiga sér þar ávallt rökræn tildrög, og lýsingar á ytra atferli þeirra samræmast nánar þeim klinisku myndum sem þekktar eru í geðlæknisfræðinni nú á dögum og gefa jafnframt vísbendingu um innra eðli þeirra [...]. Það er eftirtektarvert að [Þorgerður] viðhefur sams konar tilburði gagnvart Agli og nú á tímum þykja vænlegastir til árangurs í geðlækningum og eru í reyndinni forsenda þess að terapeutisk breyting eigi sér stað, þ.e. að sjúklingurinn losni við einkenni sín og verði aftur samur og jafn fyrir tilverknað meðferðarinnar” Jakob Jónasson. Aftur í aldir (s. 27-28).
  15. hann mundi þá yrkja mega: "Es ist nicht eine im Gedanken an englische Vorbilder ausgearbeitete Elegie, sondern ein poetischer Ausdruck der Gedanken und Empfindungen Egills, wie sie ihn an jenem Tage erfüllten." Unwerth, Wolf von. Zu Egills Sonatorrek (s. 174).
  16. freista má eg þess: "the Sonatorrek [...] gives a clearer insight into the mind of Egill than any other of his poems, showing him as an affectionate, sensitive, lonely ageing man, and not the ruffianly bully which he sometimes appears to be in the Saga." Turville-Petre, Gabriel. The Sonatorrek (s. 36).
  17. upphaf kvæðis: “The prose pictures Egil as an emotional person, at some moments without any self-control […] It’s in accordance with this, that we can find an unusual amount of emotions in his poetry and this in contrary to all formal requirements that obstruct such a thing!” (Dutch text: “Het proza beeldt Egil af als een gevoelsmens, op sommige momenten zonder enige zelfbeheersing […] Het is daarmee in overeenstemming, dat men in zijn poëzie ongewoon veel gevoel aantreft en dat ondanks alle formele eisen die zoiets in de weg stonden!”) Kroesen, Jacoba M.C.. Inleiding (s. XX).
  18. upphaf kvæðis: "While reading Egill’s poem on the loss of his sons, we are filled with admiration and wonder. Its light shines like the Northern Lights, the Aurora Borealis. It springs from a hidden source, its deep-glowing colours fanning out over the expanse of heaven, but displaying the grandeur of its radiance only in the twilight of the day." Bouman, Ari C. Egill Skallagrímsson‘s Poem Sonatorrek (s. 40).
  19. upphaf kvæðis: "The formative pressures on the canon of skaldic poetry are exerted by the centrality of the concept of lyric to several disparate cultural endeavours. One (...) is the historicist attempt to map an evolution of consciousness in Western cultures using changes in literary forms. Another is a Romantic commitment to a poetic of subjective expression: by reading Sonatorrek, we can see into Egill's soul. Lyric poems are also, of course, the preferred raw material for the modus operandi of close reading leading to 'literary appreciation' promulgated by the major literary critical movement of the mid-twentieth century, the New Criticism. (...) Sonatorrek 's status as the canonical 'classic' of the skaldic lyric, then, seems secures enough." Heslop, K. S.. Sonatorrek and the Myth of Skaldic Lyric (s. 158).
  20. mjök erum tregt: "Þyki ástæða til að vefengja að Egill hafi kveðið Sonatorrek, þá væri enginn maður líklegri til að hafa "sett sig í spor Egils" en Snorri Sturluson, svo framarlega sem hann hefir verið höfundur Egils sögu." Bjarni Einarsson. Skáldið í Reykjaholti (s. 39).
  21. tungu að hræra: "Sonattorek itself opens with a complaint about the difficulty of it’s erection [...] and although there is no question of an overt sexual or marital meaning here, the wider system of tongue/sword/penis correspondences invites us to just such associations, which serve in turn to confirm our sense that this poem stems from a very point very far down gender scale – a point at which sword and penis have given away to the tongue, and even the tongue may not be up to the task" Clover, Carol J.. Regardless of sex (s. 16).
  22. loftvægi ljóðpundara: "Úr þessum einföldu orðum má, að minni hyggju lesa mikla gamansemi: Þetta gat þó Björgólfur gamli gert, en það mátti ekki tæpara standa!" Sveinbjörn Egilsson. Bókmentasaga Íslendínga (s.179, 2. neðanmálsgrein).
  23. né hógdrægt: „So aufgefaßt bildet die Strophe in ihrem Aufbau eine schöne logische Einheit: Der Dichter geht von den rein physischen Hemmungen seines Schmerzes allmählich auf die geistige Arbeit des dichterischen Schaffens über.“ de Vries, Jan. Die erste Strophe von Egils Sonatorrek (s. 301).
  24. hugar fylgsni: „Thus there is made an analogy between drawing the "theft of Óðinn" from the breast and the mythic stealing of the mead. The use of fylgsni "hiding place" as the source of "Viðurs þýfi" suggests the myth in itself, but because fylgsni belongs to a larger unit "hugar fylgsni" this remains a subordinate, though intensifying, association“. Stevens, John. The Mead of Poetry: Myth and Metaphor (s. ??).
  25. era andþeystr: "Það er eftirtektarvert, að Egill endurtekur í tveim fyrstu vísunum sömu hugsunina fimm sinnum með breyttum orðum. Slík þráhugsun er eitt af aðaleinkennum þungrar sorgar." Guðmundur Finnbogason. Um nokkrar vísur Egils Skallagrímssonar (s. 162).
  26. fagnafundr: „The Sonatorrek, perhaps better than any other poem, illustrates the religious outlook of a man of Egill¬‘s time – even though he was a far from ordinary man. In its twenty-five strophes the Sonatorrek contains about twenty allusions to gods or myths, some of which are obscure to us. [...] Poetry, for pagans, was sacred, and in the Sonatorrek Egill several times alludes to the story of its origin. It is the joyful find of Frigg‘s kinsmen, brought long ago from the world of giants (2); it is the theft of Óðinn (1), and Óðinn‘s gift to Egill (24.)“ Turville-Petre, Gabriel. Egill Skalla-Grímsson (s. 25-26).
  27. úr jötunheimum: "Het parallellisme met de eerder besproken roof van de dichtermede door Óðinn uit het Reuzenland ligt voor de hand (...). Dat Egill inderdaad aan dit goddelijk exempel denkt, blijkt al dadelijk uit de kenningen in zijn twee aanvangsstrofen, waar hij onmiddellijk na elkaar zijn kunst omschrijft als 'Óðin’s roof' en als 'het feestgelag van Frigg’s verwanten'." Hamel, A. G. van. Ijslands Odinsgeloof (s. 175).
  28. er lifnaði: "So ist nun der Raum gegeben, daß die 3. Strophe mit neuem Einsatz das Thema selbst in Angriff nimmt: es ist nicht möglich, daß der 1. Helming noch auf etwas völlig anderes zielt, und darauf mit dem 2. Helming der Hauptteil des Gedichts den Anfang nähme." Wolff-Marburg, Ludwig. Eddisch-Skaldische Blütenlese (s. 106).
  29. ætt mín: "ruft der alte Egil in v 4 aus: 'Mein geschlecht steht am ende wie die sturmgefällten baumäste', so liegt darin das zornige bekenntnis, dass Thorstein als trost und ersatz für die toten brüder völlig versagte und somit als sohn überhaupt nicht mehr für den vater in betracht kam." Niedner, Felix. Egils Sonatorrek (S. 221).
  30. á enda stendr: "Sonatorrek er fyrsta íslenzka kvæðið og Egill fyrsti Íslendingurinn að því leyti, að hjá honum kemur fyrst skýrt fram sú sundurgreining sálarlífsins, sem skapaðist við flutning Íslendinga vestur um haf og varð skilyrði andlegra afreka þeirra, sem þeir unnu fram yfir Norðmenn." Sigurður Nordal. Átrúnaður Egils Skallagrímssonar (s. 164).
  31. sem hræbarnir: “Tones of a similar exaggerated isolation may be autible in the Wife’s Lament and the Wanderer, and Egill in Sonatorrek, st. 4, is certainly exaggerating with “...my line is at its end like the withered stump of the forest maple.“ For Egill had a surviving son as well as daughters and grandchildren.“ Harris, Joseph. Elegy in Old English and Old Norse (s. 52-53).
  32. hlynnar marka: "Mjer hefur komið til hugar, að hjer ætti að lesa hilmir." Björn M. Ólsen. Um vísu í Sonatorreki (s. 134).
  33. Það ber ég út úr orðhofi mærðar timbur máli laufgað. : "Ekki verður betur sé en að kenningin í síðari helmingi erindisins sé ættuð úr Biblíunni, nánar tiltekið úr 17. kafla Fjórðu Mósebókar. Þar segir frá því að kurr sé komin í Ísraelsþjóð en á skipar Yahve Móse að láta höfuð hverrar ættkvíslanna tólf útbúa staf og rista á hann nafn sitt. Stafirnir skulu bornir inn í samfundartjaldið og lagðir fyrir framan sáttmálann. Næsta dag kemur Móses inn í tjaldið og finnur að stafur Aarons hefur laufgast og m.a.s. borið ávöxt. Hann ber það út úr tjaldinu og sýnir það lýðnum. [...] Þegar haft er í huga að sáttmálatjaldið er forveri musterisins, þá er það augljóst að kenningin í Sonatorreki væri óhugsandi nema að skáldið hafi þekkt þessa sögu úr Biblíunni," Torfi H. Tulinius. Egla og Biblían (p. 134).
  34. Sleit mar bönd minnar ættar,: " Alla æfi hefur hann haldið hlut sínum við hvern sem var að skifta, því hann hefur jafnan getað hefnt sín, rekið harma sinna og haldið þannig uppi jöfnuði í viðskiptum sínum við aðra. En svo koma náttúruöflin og ræna hann. Við þeim má hann ekki. Sjúkdómur tekur einn son hans, sjórinn annan. Hann litast um og finst hann vera einmana. Honum finst hann standa einn, eins og helbarin hrísla, honum finst eins og lifandi kvistur sé slitinn af ættstofninum, viðkvæmustu taugar sjálfs hans skornar sundur " Guðmundur Finnbogason. Egill Skallagrímsson (s. 130-31).
  35. sjálfum mér: "Egill’s sense that an outrageous wrong has been committed against him personally, emphasised by ‘minnar ættar’ and ‘sjọlfum mér’, brings the desire for a counter attack: the same concern with justice and repayment which took such a positive form in Arinbjarnakviða here demands revenge" Larrington, Carolyne. Egill‘s longer Poems: Arinbjarnarkviða and Sonatorrek (s. 58).
  36. af sjálfum mér: "Now (in 7) the simple force of waves modulates toward the surgical as the sea appears in person: the sea-goddess ‘Rán has amputated me of loving friends’; ‘the sea has slashed the bonds of my family, a strong strand of me myself'". Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (s. 156).
  37. sverði of rækag: "In my dissertation I maintain that Egil Skallagrimsson's poem from the 10th century, Sonatorrek, can throw light on the origin of the "Eddic Elegies", as this poem like these "elegies" has grief as its main theme and shares several of the specific thematic and characteristics of the "Eddic elegies" Guðrúnarhvöt and Guðrúnarqviða I … Egil presents his son's death by drowning as a manslaughter in a heroic poem, and he reacts to the 'manslaughter' with both grief and revengeful stories." Sävborg, Daniel. Beowulf and Sonatorrek are genuine enough (s. 48).
  38. færi ég andvígr: "Vielmehr stellt Egil die exorbitante Idee, sich für den Ertrinkungstod seines Sohnes an den Göttern zu rächen, als spontane Gefühlsaufwallung dar, die bald schon dem Eingeständnis der Ohnmacht und Gebrechlichkeit weicht. Gleichwohl beherrscht die Idee der Fehde und des Rechtsstreits mit den Göttern das ganze Gedicht. [...] Nichts im Sonatorrek erinnert, wie gesagt, an irgendeines der anderen Gedichte, die man zur gemeingermanischen Elegiengattung zählen will." See, Klaus von. Das Phantom einer altgermanischen Elegiendichtung (s. 93)
  39. færi ég andvígr / Ægis mani: "Egil doesn't comfort himself with a yelding "the Lord has given, the Lord has taken", but he wishes to raise his sword against the superior powers themselves." Franz, L. Egils ‘Sonatorrek’ und die Inschrift von Rök (s. 4)
  40. miklu ræntan: "„His assertion of his inability to fight against the sea, which would of course be the same for any man, young or old, modulates into an expression of the helplessness of old age.“ Finlay, Alison. Elegy and Old Age in Egil’s Saga (s. ??).
  41. vara ills þegns efni vaxið: "Böðvar sonur Egils var, eins og Baldur, saklaus og hvers manns hugljúfi. Einkunn Baldurs, „hin góði“, kemur hins vegar einungis fram sem neikvæður úrdráttur – stílbragð sem virðist einkenni á skáldskap Egils." Harris, Joseph. Goðsögn sem hjálp til að lifa af í Sonatorreki (s. 59).
  42. elgjar gálga: "elgjar getur með engu móti hjer táknað dýrið elgr, heldur sama sem krap, hálfbræddur snjór. ... Gálgi er trje, sem eitthvað er hengt á, þótt það sje haft í fornmálinu um það trje eitt, sem menn eru hengdir í. elgjar gálgi er þá sá gálgi, sem snjór hangir á, og það verður Ísland". Halldór Kr. Friðriksson. Egils saga (s. 373).
  43. Erumka þokkt: "In Sonatorrek (96 lines) the number of such lines [i.e. ending in a monosyllabic verb] is very small; stað occurs twice, hrör once, while a double consonant follows on a short vowel in the doubtful word þokk" Craigie, William A.. On some Points in Skaldic Metre (s. 348).
  44. síð er son minn / sóttar brími : " At this point the poem changes subject. The actual memorial poem to Böðvarr has come to an end. St. 20 deals with the poet’s son who died on a sick bed. He was innocent and careful in his choice of words. For the next four strophes, Óðinn takes a central position. In st. 21, the poet states that he still remembers when Óðinn took his son to himself in the home of the gods. There is no obvious grief in this strophe. In direct continuation of this (st. 22), the poet describes the good relationship he has had with Óðinn since taking up steadfast belief in this god who broke his friendship with Þórr. The poet makes sacrifices to Óðinn, the god of poetry, not because the poet is by nature a great man for sacrifices, but rather because Óðinn offers spiritual consolation if one turns to him wholeheartedly (st. 23)." Jón Hnefill Aðalsteinsson. Religious Ideas in Sonatorrek (s. 175).
  45. við námæli: "This lack of equivalence between loss and compensation may be the association linking to st. 17 which, as we have seen, ironically cites an ancient proverb coined at a time when rebirth was a real possibility. A reprise (in 18a) of the theme of isolation, even in a time of peace, is linked, apparently causally, to the earlier filial death (18b), or so I believe; and the difficult earlier filial death (18b), or so I believe; and the difficult earlier st. 19 seems to be Egill’s reaffirmation of hostility from the gods ever since — st. 20 — Gunnar, the fair-spoken, died of a fever." Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (s. 157).
  46. átti ég gott: "Egill's profound poem also comprises ... a kind of minority report, a set of mythological allusions with an undermining and unsettling effect. These references to a group of Odinic stories outside the Baldr complex but somehow related to it seem to undercut or even deconstruct the official mythology by concerning themselves with problems that are papered or denied in the central Baldr myths ... The major stories from this group will be immediately recalled by the names of their long-lived protagonists, all sacrificers or would-be-sacrifices of sons or near-kinsmen: King Aun, King Haraldr hilditǫnn, and Strakaðr the Old. I will argue that Egill takes on the persona of each in the course of his poem." Harris, Joseph. Sacrifice and Guilt in Sonatorrek (s. 174-75).
  47. sigrhöfundr, um sleit við mig.: " Afstaða höfundar Sonatorreks til Óðins og efnisskipan kvæðisins í heild verður því óneytanlega mun skiljanlegri ef gert er ráð fyrir því að Óðinn hafi ekki brugðist sjálfur heldur slitið vináttu skáldsins við Þór eins og hér framar var lesið úr lagfærðum texta 22. erindis." Jón Hnefill Aðalsteinsson. Trúarhugmyndir í Sonatorreki (s. 119).
  48. að eg gjarn sék: “På Odin är Egill uppenbarligen besviken, för honom hade Egill litat på. Odin har ju gett honom den gåva som är värdefullare än andra: skaldekonsten. Egils reaktion får förstås mot bakgrund av den föreställningsvärld som var hans. För trollkarlen Egill är det en allt överskuggande angelägenhet att med alla medel få makterna på sin sida. När någon olycka drabbar honom är det ett tecken på att hans magiska kraft är otillräcklig.” Ralph, Bo. Om tilkomsten av Sonatorrek (s. 163).
  49. Míms vinur: "In Egil's greatest poem 'Lament for My Sons' […] he speaks of the double-face of his god. As rune-master and lord of poetry, Odin has given Egil the power of words; as lord of poetry, Odin has taken away his two sons. Yet it is the gift of poetry which makes the loss bearable, giving Egil the power to cope with his suffering by expressing it." Hermann Pálsson, Paul Edwards. Introduction (s. 11).
  50. bölva bætr: "niðurstaða þess [kvæðisins] er sú að í stóru böli, þegar ekki fæst hjálp leingur af máttarvöldum, þá sé athvarf í skáldskap." Halldór Laxness. Egill Skallagrímsson og sjónvarpið (s. 118).
  51. ef hið betra teldi: "Since Egill does not sacrifice to Odin because he is eager to, we can say he does sacrifice and does sacrifice and has sacrificed, but unwillingly. These unwilling sacrifices must be the bǫl ‘harms’ for which he has received boetr ‘compensations’ (in st. 23)." Harris, Joseph. Homo Necans Borealis. (s. 165).
  52. Gafumst íþrótt: „Í næstefsta erindi Sonatorreks drepur Egill á tvær gjafir, sem hann hafði þegið að Óðni: „vammi firrða íþrótt“ (skáldskapar) og „það geð er eg gerði mér vísa fjendur að vélöndum“. Þessi orð skáldsins gefa tilefni til ýmissa hugleiðinga um þær guðlegu gjafir, sem getið er annars staðar í fornum bókmenntum vorum“. Hermann Pálsson. Tveir þættir um Egils sögu (s. 80).
  53. vígi vanur: "Wat de gedachtenis der mythen betreft, een middel om deze in gecondenseerde vorm steeds met zich te dragen, heeft de skald in zijn kenningen, de dichterlijke omschrijvingen van geijkte vorm, die het hem mogelijk maken de dingen niet door hun prozaische naam, maar door een samenstel van grondwoord en bepalingen aan te duiden, dat dikwijls alleen door de kennis van een mythe verstaanbaar wordt." Hamel, A. G. van. Ijslands Odinsgeloof (s. 171).
  54. vammi firrða: "Að skáldskapurinn skuli sagður vera vammi firrður, bendir til samanburðar milli hans og annars athæfis, t.d. þess að vera hermaður, hirðmaður eða höfðingi. Ólíkt þessum sviðum er svið skáldskaparins þess eðlis að sá sem haslar sér þar völl þarf ekki að togast á við aðra um þau gæði sem í boði eru á sviðinu. Á þessu sviði er hann laus undan hættum, kvöðum og andstæðum kröfum hinna sviðanna. Því er sá auður sem skáldskapurinn færir manni „sannur“." Torfi H. Tulinius. Saga og samfélag (s. 163).
  55. Nú er mér torvelt: "Of this poem and others like it in the skaldic corpus it may be said that there are in fact two “topics,” an ostensible one, and the poet’s own perception of the ostensible one, and that the latter may on occasion so overshadow the former that it tends to become the poem’s main subject." Clover, Carol. Scaldic Sensibility (s. 65)
  56. með góðan vilja: "„Góður vilji“ er mjög upprunalegt hugtak í kristindómi, í senn guðfræðilegt og siðfræðilegt. [...] Skilyrði fyrir hjálpræði er að mennirnir séu með góðan vilja: blessun guðs er yfir manni sem hefur góðan vilja.; fyrir bragðið bíður hann „glaður og óhryggur“ hvers sem að höndum ber." Halldór Laxness. Nokkrir hnýsilegir staðir í fornkvæðum (s. 22).
  57. heljar bíða: "Í ... niðurlagserindi Sonatorreks, vega salt, ef svo má segja, útsynningurinn og hinn heiðni boðskapur um kjark og lífsgleði – líkt og böl og bölva bætur í vísunum næst á undan. Þannig tekst skáldinu – í lok kvæðisins – „at létta upp pundaraskaptinu“." Ólafur M. Ólafsson. Sonatorrek (s. 187).
  58. tók að hressast: „Grief, [Egill] said, made it hard for him to write. Grief did not cause him to write, but he wrote despite grief. The two are opposed. By making his poem Egill conquered his grief: the gift of poesy was “high amends” for his loss, a “fault-free unfailing skill” through which he rendered himself able to meet his fate. The crystallization of emotional experience in an intellectual form enables the poet to transcend that experience.“ Bolton, W.F. The Old Icelandic Dróttkvætt (s. 284-85).
  59. að yrkja kvæðið: „[T]he composer of Egils saga adopts a stronger interest in the poet’s production of verse in a personalised context than in his composition of court poetry for foreign rulers”.Clunies Ross, Margaret. The Skald Sagas as a Genre (s. 37).
  60. er lokið var kvæðinu: "In the saga, as well as in Ibsen’s drama [Hærmændene på Helgeland], the inclusion of the poem is not purely ornamental: it is thanks to it indeed that the character-author re-engages in action and is able to contribute to the narration again." Ferrari, Fulvio. Attraverso gli specchi della riscrittura (s. 431).
  61. og settist í öndvegi: ""Sønnetabet" giver den bedst ønskelige karakteristik af ham netop som familieoverhovedet, hvorledes han følte sit eget personlige liv ligefrem afhænge af ættens." Friðrik Á. Brekkan. Lidt om Egil Skallagrimssons personlighed (s. 117).
  62. torrek: „Mjer þykir líklegt, að Egill hafi myndað orðið torrek við þetta tækifæri. Síðar hefur merking þess færzt nokkuð til, en þó á eðlilegan hátt (torsótt hefnd, torbætt tjón, þungbær missir)“ Árni Pálsson. Sonatorrek (s. 153).
  63. Sonatorrek: "Nowhere is this burning love for Óðinn expressed more clearly than it is in the Sonatorrek, in which Egill rebukes his 'patron', who has deserted him and deprived him of his sons. We cannot say that other Icelandic poets worshipped Óðinn as passionately as Egill did, but it is plain that he filled an honourable place in their conceptions of the divine world." Turville-Petre, Gabriel. The Cult of Óðinn in Iceland (s. 9).
  64. síðan er hann staðfestist hér á Íslandi: "The change (of behaviour) seems to have been deliberate; Egill has lost none of his warrior capabilities but now lives in a society which he feels comfortable. He is successful in Iceland because he abandons the traits of the dark figure that enabled him to assert himself against monarchical authority abroad, but which have no place in Iceland (…), a society of freemen." Byock, Jesse L.. Egill Skallagrímsson. The Dark Figure as Survivor in an Icelandic Saga (s. 158).
  65. konungar þóttust eiga við hann: "The entire passage appears to be an attempt to tidy up some loose ends, parts of the Egill-tradition about which an audience might expect the narrator to have details, and which he takes special care to point out that he does not have." Bell, L. Michael. Oral Allusion in Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar (s. 53-54).
  66. orti Egill kvæði: "Strophen [...], deren Echtheit mir ziemlich sicher erscheint[:] An erster Stelle die Strophen, die den Freund Arinbjǫrn preisen, namentlich Str. 27, die dieselbe Umschreibung des Namens erhält, wie die Arinbjarnarkviða [...]." Vries, Jan de. Altnordische Literaturgeschichte (s. 139).
  67. kvæði um Arinbjörn: "[V]ísurnar um Arinbjörn mynda hápunkt verksins. Það sem eftir lifir sögunnar er ekkert annað en nauðsynleg sögulok." Baldur Hafstað. Konungsmenn í kreppu og vinátta í Egils sögu (s. 97)
  68. upphaf að: "Arinbjarnarkviða stendur aðeins í Möðruvallabók. Það vekur grun um að sagan sé tilefni þessa kveðskapar, en kveðskapurinn ekki tilefni sögunnar eins og gjarnan er talið." Sveinbjörn Rafnsson. Sagnastef í íslenskri menningarsögu (s. 93).
  69. Emk hraðkvæðr: "Egil boasts about […] being able to compose swiftly. Ease and swiftness, not least the originality of the artistic creation, are tokens of the high-rank poet. Egil’s stanza is never […] circumscribed or tendentially circular [… but] elastic and movable. The discourse develops in a cascade from the thread of semantic- and sound-associations, while being hastened by the enjambements and barely restrained by reservations and doubts. Egil’s poems move in time, they let air filter in between [the verses] and display their previous and later stage, their solutions and their premises." Koch, Ludovica. Gli scaldi (s. 111-12).
  70. hilmi at mæra: "Cela dit, que Snorri Sturluson ait « composé » Egla n’a rien d’invraissemblable : il descendait d’Egill ; à partir de 1201, il vécut à Borg comme Egill près de trois siècles plus tôt ; comme lui, il est des Mýrarmenn et connaît parfaitement toutes les traditions du Borgarfjördr. En somme, il est chez lui là où a grandi et vécu longtemps l’auteur de l’Arinbjarnarkvida." Boyer, Régis. Notice (s. 1509).
  71. mildinga sjöt: "The general themes of the poem are addressed already in the first two verses: the nature of nobility, later exemplified by Arinbjọrn, consisting in generosity, ‘mildinga’ (generous lords) 2.6, and courage, ‘jọfurs dáðum’ (a lord’s great deeds) 1.6, and their opposites: ‘gløggvinga’ (misers) 1.4, and skrọkberọndum’ (lying boasters) 2.2." Larrington, Carolyne. Egill‘s longer Poems: Arinbjarnarkviða and Sonatorrek (s. 51).
  72. ormfránn ennimáni: „Í 5. vísu Arinbjarnarkviðu er nýgerving þar sem hinum ógnvænlegu augum Eiríks blóðaxar er lýst. Í Húsdrápu Úlfs Uggasonar, sem varðveitt er í Snorra-Eddu, birtist sama nýgerving“ Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (s. 21).
  73. hattar staup: "[Í þessari vísu] líkir Egill höfði sínu við staup sem hann þiggur fyrir mjöð Óðins. Þetta minnir á vísu Braga Boddasonar þar sem hann er eins og Egill að rifja upp þann atburð er hann þá höfuð sitt fyrir skáldskap." Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (s. 22).
  74. hattar staup: "Men ordet kan också betyda ‘stop, dryckesbägare’. Följaktigen: Egill utskänker skaldemjödet ur huvudets stop och får i gengäld behålla detta stop! Det är en sinnrik tolkning, som förefaller att harmoniera ganska väl med de norröna skaldernas sinne för det komplicerade och dubbelbottnade". Hallberg, Peter. Den fornisländska poesien (s. 112).
  75. svartleit síðra brúna: "Arinbjarnarkviða staðfestir [hér] að Egill sé dökkhærður. Ófá eru þau íslensk skáld sem sögð eru dökkhærð, sbr. hið algenga skáldaviðurnefni „svarti“ ... Hefðin hefur gert skáldin dökk." Baldur Hafstað. Er Arinbjarnarkviða ungt kvæði? (s. 26).
  76. höfuðlausn: "... the Old Norse coumpound hǫfuðlausn, "head ransom or head redemption", (...) stresses no the redemption of a threatened person's whole body or his life, but of his head as a symbol of his person. In the case of a poet such as Egil the emphasis upon the head, and upon the mouth in particular, is linked to the importance of those parts as conduits for poetry, conventionally represented in skaldic verse, particularly through kennings, as an intoxicating liquid, a mead or ale, the gift of the god Odin, whoses mythic regurgitation of this precious liquid functioned as the prototypical act of poetic composition to which all skalds aspired." Clunies Ross, Margaret. Self-description in Egil’s Poetry (s. 79).
  77. sú gjöf: "The comic effect of this catalogue of treasures climaxes in the assertion that "that gift" ("sú gjǫf") was better than gold. It is possible that these three stanzas of self-description are a variation on another literary topos which is to be found in some descriptions of beautiful women. The topos, which may well be a literary universal, involves enumerating the monetary value of specific body parts of the woman and of her whole person. In Kormak's saga, two of Kormak's lausavísur (7 and 8: Sveinsson 1939, 212-13) discuss Stengerd's physical virtues in these terms." Clunies Ross, Margaret. Self-description in Egil’s Poetry (s. 81).
  78. Þar stóð mér: [The first ten stanzas of Arinbjarnarkviða] "are in fact once again not at all about the ostensible topic, but about Egill’s own bravura Höfuðlausn performance." Clover, Carol. Scaldic Sensibility (s. 66).
  79. heyrnar spanna, : "Hér hefur skáldið leitt saman tvö hugtök, spannir og heyrn, og skapað með því þriðja hugtakið, eyru. Eyrun eru kölluð spannir, en kennd til heyrnar. Slíkt er kallað að kenna, en fyrirbrigðið sjálft kenning, og er hún kjarni skáldamálsins." Ólafur M. Ólafsson. Skáldamál (s. 117).
  80. háði leiddr: "Elsewhere, however, we find Egil movingly honoring his friends, and especially his great friend Arinbjorn, and not just for being successful Vikings. He honors them for qualities we too would admire-generosity, openness, concern for others-all qualities, therefore, that he and his peers must have wanted to be remembered for." Von Nolcken, Christina. Egil Skallagrimsson and the Viking Ideal (e.b.).
  81. Vask árvakr: "Aber durch das Exegi monumentum aere perennius der letzten V. [Vísa] stellt der Dichter sein eigenes Ich wieder als Hauptsache hin. Und das gilt schliesslich fuer den ganzen Rahmen der Arbj. [Arinbjarnarkviða]: das Mittelgewicht, um das alles kreist, ist eben doch Egils Ich, seine Dichtersittlichkeit." Vogt, Walther H.. Von Bragi zu Egil (s. 202).
  82. hlóð eg lofköst: "[I]n the concluding stanza Egill returns to the idea of language as a signal tower, a beacon on a high sea-cliff like Beowulf’s arrow ... Now Egill had not read Horace’s “monumentum aere perennius”; in fact there is no reason to believe that Egill had read anyone who did not write in runes, but the fame of Arinbjörn is here made equivalent to a monument of stone. And it is hard not to think of the conjunction of stone monument, written language, and fame that we know from some of the Swedish runestones." Harris, Joseph. Romancing the Rune (s. 136-37).
  83. óbrotgjarn: "Arinbjarnarkviða er endurminning skálds um stórfeinglega ævi, sem vitjar hans í elli, með ástríðufullum viðbrögðum við mönnum konúngum vinum og guðum; henni lýkur með erindi sem gerir tímasetníngar að aukaatriði eða réttara sagt lyftir yrkisefninu upp í eilífan tíma." Halldór Laxness. Egill Skallagrímsson og sjónvarpið (s. 120).

Links

Personal tools