Egla, 62

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 62

Egil recites the poem

King Eric went to table according to his wont, and much people were with him. And when Arinbjorn knew this, then went he with all his followers fully armed to the king's palace while the king sate at table. Arinbjorn craved entrance into the hall; it was granted. He and Egil went in with half of his followers, but the other half stood without before the door. Arinbjorn saluted the king; the king received him well. Arinbjorn spoke: 'Here now is come Egil. He has not sought to run away in the night. Nor would we fain know, my lord, what his lot is to be. I hope thou wilt let him get good from my words, for I think it a matter of great moment to me that Egil gain terms from thee. I have so acted (as was right) that neither in word nor deed have I spared aught whereby thy honour should be made greater than before. I have also abandoned all my possessions, kinsmen, and friends that I had in Norway, and followed thee when all other barons deserted thee; and herein do I what is meet, for thou hast often done great good to me.'

Then spoke Gunnhilda: 'Cease, Arinbjorn, nor prate so at length of this. Thou hast done much good to king Eric, and this he hath fully rewarded. Thou owest far more duty to king Eric than to Egil. It is not for thee to ask that Egil go unpunished hence from king Eric's presence, seeing what crimes he hath wrought.'

Then said Arinbjorn: 'If thou, O king, and thou Gunnhilda, if ye two have resolved that Egil shall here get no terms, then is this the manly course, to give him respite and leave to go for a week, that he may look out for himself; of his own free will any way he came hither to seek you, and therefore hoped for peace. Thereafter, this done, let your dealings together end as they may.'

Gunnhilda said, 'Well can I see by this, Arinbjorn, that thou art more faithful to Egil than to king Eric. If Egil is to ride hence for a week, then will he in this time be come to king Athelstan. But king Eric cannot now hide this from himself, that every king is now stronger than is he, whereas a little while ago it had been deemed incredible that king Eric would not have the will and energy to avenge his wrongs on such a one as Egil.'

Said Arinbjorn: 'No one will call Eric a greater man for slaying a yeoman's son, a foreigner, who has freely come into his power. But if the king wishes to achieve greatness hereby, then will I help him in this, so that these tidings shall be thought more worthy of record; for I and Egil will now back each other, so that we must both be met at once. Thou wilt then, O king, dearly buy the life of Egil, when we be all laid dead on the field, I and my followers. Far other treatment should I have expected of thee, than that thou wouldst prefer seeing me laid dead on the earth to granting me the boon I crave of one man's life.'

Then answered the king: 'A wondrous eager champion art thou, Arinbjorn, in this thy helping of Egil. Loth were I to do thee scathe, if it comes to this; if thou wilt rather give away thine own life than that he be slain. But sufficient are the charges against Egil, whatever I cause to be done with him.'

And when the king had said this, then Egil advanced before him and began the poem,[1] and recited in a loud voice,[2] and at once won silence.[3]

HEAD-RANSOM[4][5]

1.
'Westward I sailed[6] the wave,[7]
Within me Odin gave[8][9]
The sea of song I bear
(So 'tis my wont to fare):[10]
I launched my floating oak
When loosening ice-floes broke,
My mind a galleon fraught[11]
With load of minstrel thought.[12]

2.
'A prince doth hold me guest,
Praise be his due confess'd:
Of Odin's mead[13] let draught
In England now be quaff'd.
Laud bear I to the king,
Loudly his honour sing;
Silence I crave around,
My song of praise is found.[14]

3.
'Sire, mark the tale I tell,
Such heed beseems thee well;
Better I chaunt my strain,
If stillness hush'd I gain.
The monarch's wars in word
Widely have peoples heard,
But Odin saw alone
Bodies before him strown.

4.
'Swell'd of swords the sound[15]
Smiting bucklers round,[16]
Fiercely waxed the fray,
Forward the king made way.
Struck the ear (while blood
Streamed from glaives in flood)
Iron hailstorm's song,
Heavy, loud and long.

5.
'Lances, a woven fence,
Well-ordered bristle dense;
On royal ships in line
Exulting spearmen shine.
Soon dark with bloody stain
Seethed there an angry main,
With war-fleet's thundering sound,
With wounds and din around.

6.
'Of men many a rank
Mid showering darts sank:[17]
Glory and fame
Gat Eric's name.[18]

7.
'More may yet be told,
An men silence hold:
Further feats and glory,
Fame hath noised in story.
Warriors' wounds were rife,
Where the chief waged strife;
Shivered swords with stroke
On blue shield-rims broke.

8.
'Breast-plates ringing crashed,
Burning helm-fire flashed,
Biting point of glaive
Bloody wound did grave.
Odin's oaks (they say)
In that iron-play
Baldric's crystal blade
Bowed and prostrate laid.

9.
'Spears crossing dashed,
Sword-edges clashed:
Glory and fame
Gat Eric's name.

10.
'Red blade the king did wield,[19]
Ravens flocked o'er the field.[20]
Dripping spears flew madly,
Darts with aim full deadly.
Scotland's scourge let feed
Wolf, the Ogress' steed:[21]
For erne of downtrod dead
Dainty meal was spread.

11.
'Soared battle-cranes
O'er corse-strown lanes,
Found flesh-fowl's bill
Of blood its fill.
While deep the wound
He delves, around
Grim raven's beak
Blood-fountains break.

12.
'Axe furnished feast
For Ogress' beast:
Eric on the wave
To wolves flesh-banquet gave.

13.
'Javelins flying sped,
Peace affrighted fled;
Bows were bent amain,
Wolves were battle-fain:
Spears in shivers split,
Sword-teeth keenly bit;
Archers' strings loud sang,
Arrows forward sprang.

14.
'He back his buckler flings
From arm beset with rings,
Sword-play-stirrer good,
Spiller of foemen's blood.
Waxing everywhere
(Witness true I bear),
East o'er billows came
Eric's sounding name.

15.
'Bent the king his yew,
Bees wound-bearing flew:
Eric on the wave
To wolves flesh-banquet gave.

16.
'Yet to make more plain
I to men were fain
High-soul'd mood of king,
But must swiftly sing.
Weapons when he takes,
The battle-goddess wakes,
On ships' shielded side
Streams the battle-tide.

17.
'Gems from wrist he gives,
Glittering armlets rives:
Lavish ring-despiser
Loves not hoarding miser.[22]
Frodi's flour of gold
Gladdens rovers bold;
Prince bestoweth scorning
Pebbles hand-adorning.

18.
'Foemen might not stand
For his deathful brand;
Yew-bow loudly sang,
Sword-blades meeting rang.
Lances aye were cast,
Still he the land held fast,
Proud Eric prince renowned;
And praise his feats hath crowned.

19.
'Monarch, at thy will
Judge my minstrel skill:
Silence thus to find
Sweetly cheered my mind.
Moved my mouth with word
From my heart's ground stirred,[23]
Draught of Odin's wave
Due to warrior brave.

20.
'Silence I have broken,
A sovereign's glory spoken:
Words I knew well-fitting
Warrior-council sitting.
Praise from heart I bring,
Praise to honoured king:
Plain I sang and clear
Song that all could hear.'[24]

References

  1. began the poem: "We see that Höfuðlausn is no less complex than Egill’s other major poems. What is more, the context of the saga, the interpretation of the poem and its reflection by Egill himself, mark it as the climax in Egill’s self-stylization as a skald and his artistic independence from royal power." Kries, Susanne & Thomas Krömmelbein. Context and Composion (p. 377).
  2. recited in a loud voice: "die wahre gesinnung Egils gegen seinen todfeind und seine innere erbitterung über die zwangslage, in die er versetzt war, kommen dagegen bei näherem zusehen im gegensatz zu der älteren ehrlich gemeinen drápa [...] in versteckten ironischen anspielungen genugsam zum ausdruck." Niedner, Felix. Egils Hauptlösung (p. 113).
  3. once won silence: "Also sind Hl. [Hǫfuðlausn] und Es. [Egils saga] selbständige zeugnisse dafür, dass Hl. ein nicht aufrichtig gemeintes gedicht ist und eine fingierte situation voraussetzt. Diese selbst ist aber nach dem zeugnis von Hl. eine andere als die von Es. ausgeführte.“ Vogt, Walther H.. Egils Hauptelösung (p. 398).
  4. HEAD-RANSOM: "On the other hand, ecclesiastical influence from rhymed Latin hymns can be more plausibly traced in Egil’s Höfuðlausn, perhaps indicating different forms of cultural contact, and different manifestations of identity, in the different environments of Scandinavian York and Dublin." Townend, Matthew. Whatever happened to York Viking Poetry? (p. 58).
  5. Head-ransom: „Runhendur háttur eða runhenda er eini forni hátturinn sem hefur endarím. Elsta kvæði undir þeim hætti telja menn vera Höfuðlausn (2. dæmi) Egils Skalla-Grímssonar en þá loka fræðimenn augunum fyrir því að Skalla-Grími er eignuð runhend vísa í Egils sögu sem á að vera ort löngu áður en Egill fæddist. Vandamálið er að þótt endarím hafi þekkst í germönskum kveðskap á meginlandinu á 9. öld og í ensku kvæði frá 10. öld þá er því ekki trúað að Skalla-Grímur hafi átt þess kost að kynnast því; hins vegar kunni Egill að hafa lært þetta af Englendingum." Bjarni Einarsson. Dróttkvæði (p. 317).
  6. Westward I sailed: "Jeg hævder saaledes, at der ikke foreligger den mindste tvingende Grund til at antage, at Egil er kommen fra Norge, og ikke lige saa godt fra Island, fordi han siger „Vesterpaa kom jeg over havet.“ For ham og enhver af hans samtidige og for Oldtidens Islændere overhovedet var det et naturligt Udtryk at sige „Vesterpaa“ til Skotland, Irland osv. Og „vestfra“ de samme Lande med Udgangspunkt paa Island”. Finnur Jónsson. Egil Skallagrimsson og Erik blodöxe. Höfuðlausn (p. 135).
  7. the wave: Höfuðlausn is an example of a poem (concerning Eiríkr blóðøx) with “no religious elements except in kennings and figures of speech”. Fidjestøl, Bjarne. Skaldic Poetry and the Conversion (p. 150).
  8. me Odin gave: "Die Spannung der Dichterleistung macht Egils Ich aus in Eingang und Schluss der Hfl [Höfuðlausn]: Das Lied, das Lied! Mein Lied!" Vogt, Walther H.. Von Bragi zu Egil (p. 202).
  9. Within me Odin gave: "... however, Egill‘s early end-rhymed poem did not abandon the established forms used in skaldic poetry,but merely embellished them – note, for example, that the rhyming half-lines of Egill‘s poem are still bound together through alliteration in the traditional manner." Layher, William. The Big Splash: End-Rhyme and Innovation in Medieval Scandinavian Poetics (p. 411)
  10. So 'tis my wont to fare: "Þegar Egill Skalla- Grímsson segir í fjórða vísuorði Höfuðlausnar: „svá er mitt of far“ á hann í orði kveðnu við skipið sem flytur skáldskapinn til konungs en einnig við eigið skapferli." Torfi H. Tulinius. Á kálfskinni. Hugleiðing um ofljóst í óbundnu máli (p. 801).
  11. My mind a galleon fraught: "Die beiden ersten strophen des gedichtes selbst stehn im gegensatz zur sagaprosa. alle versuche diese gegensätze zu beheben, sind als misglückt [sic] zu bezeichnen." Reichardt, Konstantin. Die entstehungsgechichte von Egils Höfuðlausn (p. 268).
  12. With load of minstrel thought.: "1. vísa Höfuðlausnar er gerða af svo mikilli íþrótt að hún stendur fyllilega jafnfætis bestu vísum sögunnar að myndvísi. Þann vísnasmið mætti að sjálfsögðu kalla Egil. Tvíræðni erindisins bendir hins vegar til að höfundur þess hafi haft allnáin kynni af latneskum kveðskap; í rauninni var engin ferð farin heldur aðeins ort." Sverrir Tómasson. Bezta var kvæðit fram flutt (s. 69).
  13. Odin's mead: "An important semantic field that is introduced to the poem in the first two stanzas is that of liquids: a variety of kinetic liquids, travelled over, like the sea, or vital and vivifying, like Óðinn’s mead" (p. 90).Hines, John. Egill’s Höfuðlausn in Time and Place (p. 90).
  14. My song of praise is found: "In the poem [Höfuðlausn] there are 144 lines, and 72 of these end in a monosyllable; with four exceptions (vann : þann : hann : fann) these words have a short vowel or end in a vowel... in a riming poem there would be the very strongest reasons for using a long full-stressed syllable to end the line. But Egill never once falls into this..." Craigie, William A.. On some Points in Skaldic Metre (p. 348-349).
  15. Swell'd of swords the sound: "Considering its fresh modernity of the meter, Höfuðlausn must have been very effective in recital, as indeed it still is. The poem is highly suggestive of the rush of weapons and the clash of battle." Stefán Einarsson. The Poetry of Egill Skalla-Grímsson (p. 42).
  16. 'Swell'd of swords the sound Smiting bucklers round,: "hafi breytingar orðið á vísunum í aldanna rás, þá er auðvitað líklegra að þær breytingar yrðu í átt til yngra máls, til þess að lagfæra rímið. Grunur leikur einmitt á því að slík breyting hafi orðið á einum stað í Höfðulausn, þ.e. frá upphaflegri mynd til þess sem stendur í handritum. " Jónas Kristjánsson. Kveðskapur Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 24).
  17. 'Of men many a rank / Mid showering darts sank: "... hníga may be applied equally to the sinking or bending of almost any object, from the sun to a dying warrior or a tree (see Vigfusson's Dic., page 276)... Hnit is rendered (...) by 'thrust.' Concerning this word, too, there is some difference in opinion. In Vigfusson we find hnit rendered as "forging; poet., the clash of battle," with a reference to our poem. In this connection it would be more properly rendered simply by 'clash', or perhaps better by 'din.'" Dodge, Daniel Kilham. On a Verse in the Old Norse "Höfuðlausn" (p. 9)
  18. Glory and fame / Gat Eric's name: "The scaldic form appropriate for praising a king, the drápa, is characterized by having a refrain and so provides a possible formal source for Deor. The use of the refrain is also significant to this argument because it is a likely place to include the name of the one praised." Biggs, Frederick M.. Deor’s Threatened “Blame Poem” (p. 319).
  19. Red blade the king did wield: " Heyrði nokkur brest? Sé svo, þá var það Höfuðlaun sem brast úr höndum Agli Skallagrímssyni. Það væri jafnfjarri líkindum að 10du aldar maður hefði rímað saman hjǫr og gør, eins og t.d. nætr og fætr eða gil og dyl eða bíð og sýð eða leik og reyk." Jón Helgason. Höfuðlausnarhjal (p. 170).
  20. Ravens flocked o'er the field: "Þrenns konar merking orðsins gjör í Höfuðlausn virðist því koma til álita: ‘fjöldi, grúi’, ‘æti’ eða ‘ásókn í æti, græðgi’." Haraldur Bernharðsson. Göróttur er drykkurinn (p. 52).
  21. Scotland's scourge let feed / Wolf, the Ogress' steed:: " Cwyldrof, the third compound, [in Exodus] is a reminder that wolves in skaldic kennings tend to be characterized not as corpse-pickers but as the mounts of giantesses, trollwives, or witches, steeds of the kveldriða" Frank, Roberta. Did Anglo-Saxon audiences have a skaldic tooth? (s. 350).
  22. hoarding miser: "Når det gjeld Höfuðlausn, har diktet etter alt å døme ikkje følgd soga frå opphavet ... I str. 17 finn vi følgjande variantar: ... hodd- og hring er her bytte om, og Ɛ har freyr der W har brjótr. Freyr kan kanskje vere ei minning om kenninga sverðfreyr, som fins i ei av særstrofene til W." Fidjestøl, Bjarne. Det norrøne fyrstediktet (p. 50).
  23. From my heart's ground stirred: "How can one not think here that Egil expects the auditor, especially the king, to temporarily disorientate oneself, [...] so that the arrogance [in the poem] may be retrieved with sufficient delay for him to escape to safety?" Koch, Ludovica. Il corvo della memoria e il corvo del pensiero (p. 44).
  24. all could hear: "Lokavísa Höfuðlausnar hefur lengi þótt torskilin og hlotið fyrir óþokka útgefenda." Bjarni Einarsson. Glíman við lokavísu Höfuðlausnar (p. 89).

Kafli 62

Egill flutti kvæðið

Eiríkur konungur gekk til borða að vanda sínum og var þá fjölmenni mikið með honum. Og er Arinbjörn varð þess var þá gekk hann með alla sveit sína alvopnaða í konungsgarð þá er konungur sat yfir borðum. Arinbjörn krafði sér inngöngu í höllina. Honum var það og heimult gert. Ganga þeir Egill inn með helming sveitarinnar. Annar helmingur stóð úti fyrir dyrum.

Arinbjörn kvaddi konung en konungur fagnaði honum vel. Arinbjörn mælti: „Nú er hér kominn Egill. Hefir hann ekki leitað til brotthlaups í nótt. Nú viljum vér vita herra hver hans hluti skal vera. Vænti eg góðs af yður. Hefi eg það gert sem vert var að eg hefi engan hlut til þess sparað að gera og mæla svo að yðvar vegur væri þá meiri en áður. Hefi eg og látið allar mínar eigur og frændur og vini er eg átti í Noregi og fylgt yður en allir lendir menn yðrir skildust við yður og er það maklegt því að þú hefir marga hluti til mín stórvel gert.“

Þá mælti Gunnhildur: „Hættu Arinbjörn og tala ekki svo langt um þetta. Margt hefir þú vel gert við Eirík konung og hefir hann það fullu launað. Er þér miklu meiri vandi á við Eirík konung en Egil. Er þér þess ekki biðjanda að Egill fari refsingalaust héðan af fundi Eiríks konungs slíkt sem hann hefir til saka gert.“

Þá segir Arinbjörn: „Ef þú konungur og þið Gunnhildur hafið það einráðið að Egill skal hér enga sætt fá, þá er það drengskapur að gefa honum frest og fararleyfi um viku sakir að hann forði sér, þó hefir hann að sjálfvilja sínum farið hingað á fund yðvarn og vænti sér af því friðar. Fara þá enn skipti yður sem verða má þaðan frá.“

Gunnhildur mælti: „Sjá kann eg á þessu Arinbjörn að þú ert hollari Agli en Eiríki konungi. Ef Egill skal ríða héðan viku í brott í friði þá mun hann kominn til Aðalsteins konungs á þessi stundu. En Eiríkur konungur þarf nú ekki að dyljast í því að honum verða nú allir konungar ofureflismenn en fyrir skömmu mundi það þykja ekki líklegt að Eiríkur konungur mundi eigi hafa til þess vilja og atferð að hefna harma sinna á hverjum manni slíkum sem Egill er.“

Arinbjörn segir: „Engi maður mun Eirík kalla að meira mann þó að hann drepi einn bóndason útlendan, þann er gengið hefir á vald hans. En ef hann vill miklast af þessu þá skal eg það veita honum að þessi tíðindi skulu heldur þykja frásagnarverð því að við Egill munum nú veitast að svo að jafnsnemma skal okkur mæta báðum. Muntu konungur þá dýrt kaupa líf Egils um það er vér erum allir að velli lagðir, eg og sveitungar mínir. Mundi mig annars vara af yður en þú mundir mig vilja leggja heldur að jörðu en láta mig þiggja líf eins manns er eg bið.“

Þá segir konungur: „Allmikið kapp leggur þú á þetta Arinbjörn, að veita Agli lið. Trauður mun eg til vera að gera þér skaða ef því er að skipta ef þú vilt heldur leggja fram líf þitt en hann sé drepinn. En ærnar eru sakir til við Egil hvað sem eg læt gera við hann.“

Og er konungur hafði þetta mælt þá gekk Egill fyrir hann og hóf upp kvæðið[1] og kvað hátt[2] og fékk þegar hljóð.[3]

Höfuðlausn[4][5]

1.
Vestr fór eg[6] um ver[7]
en eg Viðris ber[8][9]
munstrandar mar,
svo er mitt of far.[10]
Dró eg eik á flot
við ísa brot.
Hlóð eg mæta hlut[11]
míns knarrar skut.[12]

2.
Buðumst hilmir löð,
nú á eg hróðurs kvöð.
Ber eg Óðins mjöð[13]
of Engla bjöð.
Lofa eg ísarns vann
jöfur, mæri eg þann.
Hljóðs æsk’t eg hann
því að hróðr of fann.[14]

3.
Víst hyggjum að,
vel sómir það,
hve eg þylja fæti
ef eg þögn of gæti.
Flestur maður of frá,
hvað fylkir vá,
en vísir sá
hvar valur of lá.

4.
Óx hjörva glöm[15]
við hlífar þröm.[16]
Gunnr óx of gram.
Gramr sótti fram.
Þér heyrðuð þá,
þaut mækis á,
málmhríðar spá
Sú var mest of lá.

5.
Varat villur staðar
vefur darraðar
of grams glaðar
geirvangs raðar.
þá er í blóði
en brimils móði
völlur of þrumdi
und véum glumdi.

6.
Hné folk á fit
við fleina hnit.[17]
Orðstír of gat
Eiríkr of þat.[18]

7.
Fremur mun eg segja
ef firar þegja.
Frágum fleira
til farar þeirra.
Brustu brandar
við blár randir
Óxu undir
við jöfurs fundi.

8.
Hlam heinsöðull
við hjaldurröðul.
Beit bengrefill,
þat var blóðrefill.
Frá eg að felli
fyrir fetilssvelli
Óðins eiki
í járnleiki.

9.
Þar var odda at
ok eggja gnat.
Orðstír of gat
Eiríkr of þat.

10.
Rauð hilmir hjör.[19]
Þar var hrafna gjör.[20]
Fleinn sótti fjör.
Flugu dreyrug spjör.
Ól flagðs gota
fárbjóðr Skota.[21]
Trað nift Nara
náttverð ara.

11.
Flugu hjaldurtrana
á hrælanar.
Vorut blóðs vanar
benmárs granar.
Sleit und freki
en oddbreki
gnúði hrafni
á höfuðstafni.

12.
Kom gríðar læ
að Gjálpar skæ.
Bauð úlfum hræ
Eiríkr of sæ.

13.
Beit fleinn floginn.
Þá var friður loginn.
Varð úlfur feginn
en álmr dreginn.
Brustu broddar,
en bitu oddar.
Báru hörvar
af bogum örvar.

14.
Bregður bjóðfleti
með baugseti
hjörleiks hvati,
hann er þjóð skati.
Þróast hjaldur sem hvar
of hilmi þar.
Frétt er austr of mar,
Eiríks of far.

15.
Jöfur sveigði ý.
Flugu unda bý.
Bauð úlfum hræ
Eiríkr of sæ.

16.
Brýtur bógvita
bjóður hrafnslita.
Muna hringdofa
hodd-Freyr [22]lofa.
Glaðar flotna fjöl
við Fróða mjöl.
Mjög er hilmi föl
haukstrandar möl.

17.
Stóðst fólkhagi
við fjörlagi.
Gall ýbogi
að eggtogi.
Verpur árbrandi
en jöfur landi
heldur hornklofi.
Hann er næstur lofi.

18.
Jöfur hyggi at
hve eg yrkja fat
gott þykkjumst þat
er eg þögn of gat.
Hrærði eg munni
af mærðar grunni
Óðins ægi
at jötuns fægi.

19.
Bar eg þengils lof
of þagnar rof.
Kann eg mála mjöt
of manna sjöt.
Óð færi eg fram
of ítran gram
úr hlátra ham[23]
svo hann of nam.

20.
Njótið bauga[24]
sem Bragi auga
vagna vára
og Vilji tára.

Tilvísanir

  1. hóf upp kvæðið: "We see that Höfuðlausn is no less complex than Egill’s other major poems. What is more, the context of the saga, the interpretation of the poem and its reflection by Egill himself, mark it as the climax in Egill’s self-stylization as a skald and his artistic independence from royal power." Kries, Susanne & Thomas Krömmelbein. Context and Composion (s. 377).
  2. og kvað hátt: „die wahre gesinnung Egils gegen seinen todfeind und seine innere erbitterung über die zwangslage, in die er versetzt war, kommen dagegen bei näherem zusehen im gegensatz zu der älteren ehrlich gemeinen drápa [...] in versteckten ironischen anspielungen genugsam zum ausdruck.“ Niedner, Felix. Egils Hauptlösung (s. 113).
  3. fékk þegar hljóð: "Also sind Hl. [Hǫfuðlausn] und Es. [Egils saga] selbständige zeugnisse dafür, dass Hl. ein nicht aufrichtig gemeintes gedicht ist und eine fingierte situation voraussetzt. Diese selbst ist aber nach dem zeugnis von Hl. eine andere als die von Es. ausgeführte.“ Vogt, Walther H.. Egils Hauptelösung (s. 398).
  4. Höfuðlausn: "On the other hand, ecclesiastical influence from rhymed Latin hymns can be more plausibly traced in Egil’s Höfuðlausn, perhaps indicating different forms of cultural contact, and different manifestations of identity, in the different environments of Scandinavian York and Dublin." Townend, Matthew. Whatever happened to York Viking Poetry? (s. 58).
  5. Höfuðlausn: „Runhendur háttur eða runhenda er eini forni hátturinn sem hefur endarím. Elsta kvæði undir þeim hætti telja menn vera Höfuðlausn (2. dæmi) Egils Skalla-Grímssonar en þá loka fræðimenn augunum fyrir því að Skalla-Grími er eignuð runhend vísa í Egils sögu sem á að vera ort löngu áður en Egill fæddist. Vandamálið er að þótt endarím hafi þekkst í germönskum kveðskap á meginlandinu á 9. öld og í ensku kvæði frá 10. öld þá er því ekki trúað að Skalla-Grímur hafi átt þess kost að kynnast því; hins vegar kunni Egill að hafa lært þetta af Englendingum." Bjarni Einarsson. Dróttkvæði (s. 317).
  6. Vestr fór eg: "Jeg hævder saaledes, at der ikke foreligger den mindste tvingende Grund til at antage, at Egil er kommen fra Norge, og ikke lige saa godt fra Island, fordi han siger „Vesterpaa kom jeg over havet.“ For ham og enhver af hans samtidige og for Oldtidens Islændere overhovedet var det et naturligt Udtryk at sige „Vesterpaa“ til Skotland, Irland osv. Og „vestfra“ de samme Lande med Udgangspunkt paa Island”. Finnur Jónsson. Egil Skallagrimsson og Erik blodöxe. Höfuðlausn (s. 135).
  7. um ver: "Höfuðlausn is an example of a poem (concerning Eiríkr blóðøx) with “no religious elements except in kennings and figures of speech”. Fidjestøl, Bjarne. Skaldic Poetry and the Conversion (s. 150).
  8. eg Viðris ber: "Die Spannung der Dichterleistung macht Egils Ich aus in Eingang und Schluss der Hfl [Höfuðlausn]: Das Lied, das Lied! Mein Lied!" Vogt, Walther H.. Von Bragi zu Egil (s. 202).
  9. en eg Viðris ber: "... however, Egill‘s early end-rhymed poem did not abandon the established forms used in skaldic poetry,but merely embellished them – note, for example, that the rhyming half-lines of Egill‘s poem are still bound together through alliteration in the traditional manner." Layher, William. The Big Splash: End-Rhyme and Innovation in Medieval Scandinavian Poetics (s. 411)
  10. svo er mitt of far: "Þegar Egill Skalla- Grímsson segir í fjórða vísuorði Höfuðlausnar: „svá er mitt of far“ á hann í orði kveðnu við skipið sem flytur skáldskapinn til konungs en einnig við eigið skapferli." Torfi H. Tulinius. Á kálfskinni. Hugleiðing um ofljóst í óbundnu máli (s. 801).
  11. Hlóð eg mæta hlut: "Die beiden ersten strophen des gedichtes selbst stehn im gegensatz zur sagaprosa. alle versuche diese gegensätze zu beheben, sind als misglückt [sic] zu bezeichnen." Reichardt, Konstantin. Die entstehungsgechichte von Egils Höfuðlausn (s. 268).
  12. míns knarrar skut.: "1. vísa Höfuðlausnar er gerða af svo mikilli íþrótt að hún stendur fyllilega jafnfætis bestu vísum sögunnar að myndvísi. Þann vísnasmið mætti að sjálfsögðu kalla Egil. Tvíræðni erindisins bendir hins vegar til að höfundur þess hafi haft allnáin kynni af latneskum kveðskap; í rauninni var engin ferð farin heldur aðeins ort." Sverrir Tómasson. Bezta var kvæðit fram flutt (s. 69).
  13. Óðins mjöð: "An important semantic field that is introduced to the poem in the first two stanzas is that of liquids: a variety of kinetic liquids, travelled over, like the sea, or vital and vivifying, like Óðinn’s mead" (p. 90).Hines, John. Egill’s Höfuðlausn in Time and Place (s. 90).
  14. því að hróðr of fann: "In the poem [Höfuðlausn] there are 144 lines, and 72 of these end in a monosyllable; with four exceptions (vann : þann : hann : fann) these words have a short vowel or end in a vowel... in a riming poem there would be the very strongest reasons for using a long full-stressed syllable to end the line. But Egill never once falls into this..." Craigie, William A.. On some Points in Skaldic Metre (s. 348-349).
  15. Óx hjörva glöm: „Considering its fresh modernity of the meter, Höfuðlausn must have been very effective in recital, as indeed it still is. The poem is highly suggestive of the rush of weapons and the clash of battle." Stefán Einarsson. The Poetry of Egill Skalla-Grímsson (s. 42).
  16. Óx hjörva glöm við hlífar þröm.: "hafi breytingar orðið á vísunum í aldanna rás, þá er auðvitað líklegra að þær breytingar yrðu í átt til yngra máls, til þess að lagfæra rímið. Grunur leikur einmitt á því að slík breyting hafi orðið á einum stað í Höfðulausn, þ.e. frá upphaflegri mynd til þess sem stendur í handritum. " Jónas Kristjánsson. Kveðskapur Egils Skallagrímssonar (s. 24).
  17. Hné folk á fit/við fleina hnit: hníga may be applied equally to the sinking or bending of almost any object, from the sun to a dying warrior or a tree (see Vigfusson's Dic., page 276)... Hnit is rendered (...) by 'thrust.' Concerning this word, too, there is some difference in opinion. In Vigfusson we find hnit rendered as "forging; poet., the clash of battle," with a reference to our poem. In this connection it would be more properly rendered simply by 'clash', or perhaps better by 'din.'" Dodge, Daniel Kilham. On a Verse in the Old Norse "Höfuðlausn" (s. 9)
  18. Orðstír of gat / Eiríkr of þat: "The scaldic form appropriate for praising a king, the drápa, is characterized by having a refrain and so provides a possible formal source for Deor. The use of the refrain is also significant to this argument because it is a likely place to include the name of the one praised." Biggs, Frederick M.. Deor’s Threatened “Blame Poem” (s. 319).
  19. Rauð hilmir hjör: " Heyrði nokkur brest? Sé svo, þá var það Höfuðlaun sem brast úr höndum Agli Skallagrímssyni. Það væri jafnfjarri líkindum að 10du aldar maður hefði rímað saman hjǫr og gør, eins og t.d. nætr og fætr eða gil og dyl eða bíð og sýð eða leik og reyk." Jón Helgason. Höfuðlausnarhjal (s. 170).
  20. Þar var hrafna gjör: "Þrenns konar merking orðsins gjör í Höfuðlausn virðist því koma til álita: ‘fjöldi, grúi’, ‘æti’ eða ‘ásókn í æti, græðgi’." Haraldur Bernharðsson. Göróttur er drykkurinn (s. 52).
  21. Ól flagðs gota / fárbjóðr Skota.: " Cwyldrof, the third compound, [in Exodus] is a reminder that wolves in skaldic kennings tend to be characterized not as corpse-pickers but as the mounts of giantesses, trollwives, or witches, steeds of the kveldriða" Frank, Roberta. Did Anglo-Saxon audiences have a skaldic tooth? (s. 350).
  22. hodd-Freyr: "Når det gjeld Höfuðlausn, har diktet etter alt å døme ikkje følgd soga frå opphavet ... I str. 17 finn vi følgjande variantar: ... hodd- og hring er her bytte om, og Ɛ har freyr der W har brjótr. Freyr kan kanskje vere ei minning om kenninga sverðfreyr, som fins i ei av særstrofene til W." Fidjestøl, Bjarne. Det norrøne fyrstediktet (s. 50).
  23. úr hlátra ham: "How can one not think here that Egil expects the auditor, especially the king, to temporarily disorientate oneself, [...] so that the arrogance [in the poem] may be retrieved with sufficient delay for him to escape to safety?" Koch, Ludovica. Il corvo della memoria e il corvo del pensiero (s. 44).
  24. njótið bauga: "Lokavísa Höfuðlausnar hefur lengi þótt torskilin og hlotið fyrir óþokka útgefenda." Bjarni Einarsson. Glíman við lokavísu Höfuðlausnar (s. 89).

Links

Personal tools