Egla, 22

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 22

Death of Thorolf Kveldulfsson

King Harold was at Hlada when the brothers went away. Immediately after this the king made him ready with all haste, and embarked his force on four ships, and they rowed up the firth, and so by Beitis-sea inwards to the isthmus of Elda. There he left his ships behind, and crossed the isthmus northwards to Naumdale. The king there took ships belonging to the landowners, and embarked his force on them, having with him his guard; four hundred men they were. Six ships he had well equipped both with weapons and men. They encountered a fresh head-wind, and rowed night and day, making what progress they could. The night was then light enough for travel.

On the evening of a day after sunset they came to Sandness, and saw lying there opposite the farm a long-ship with tent spread, which they knew to be Thorolf's. He was even then purposing to sail away, and had bidden them brew the ale for their parting carousal. The king ordered his men to disembark and his standard to be raised. It was but a short way to the farm buildings.

Thorolf's watchmen sate within drinking, and were not gone to their posts; not a man was without; all sate within drinking. The king had a ring of men set round the hall:[1] they then shouted a war-whoop, and a war-blast was blown on the king's trumpet. On hearing which Thorolf's men sprang to their weapons, for each man's weapons hung above his seat. The king caused some to make proclamation at the door, bidding women, children, old men, thralls, and bondmen to come out. Then came out Sigridr the mistress, and with her the women that were within, and the others to whom permission was given. Sigridr asked if the sons of Kari of Berdla were there. They both came forward and asked what she would of them.

'Lead me to the king,' said she.

They did so. But when she came to the king, she said: 'Will anything, my lord, avail to reconcile thee with Thorolf?'

The king answered, 'If Thorolf will yield him to my mercy, then shall he have life and limb, but his men shall undergo punishment according to the charges against them.'

Upon this Aulvir Hnuf went to the room, and had Thorolf called to speak with him, and told him what terms the king offered them.

Thorolf answered that he would not take of the king compulsory terms or reconciliation. 'Bid thou the king allow us to go out, and then leave we things to go their own course.'

The king said: 'Set fire to the room; I will not waste my men by doing battle with him outside; I know that Thorolf will work us great man-scathe if he come out, though he has fewer men than we.'

So fire was set to the room, and it soon caught, because the wood was dry and the walls tarred and the roof thatched with birch-bark. Thorolf bade his men break up the wainscoting and get gable-beams, and so burst through the planking; and when they got the beams, then as many men as could hold on to it took one beam, and they rammed at the corner with the other beam-end so hard that the clasps flew out, and the walls started asunder, and there was a wide outlet.

First went out Thorolf, then Thorgils Yeller, then the rest one after another. Fierce then was the fight; nor for awhile could it be seen which had the better of it, for the room guarded the rear of Thorolf's force. The king lost many men before the room began to burn; then the fire attacked Thorolf's side, and many of them fell. Now Thorolf bounded forwards and hewed on either hand; small need to bind the wounds of those who encountered him. He made for where the king's standard was, and at this moment fell Thorgils Yeller. But when Thorolf reached the shield-wall, he pierced with a stroke the standard-bearer, crying, 'Now am I but three feet short of my aim.' Then bore at him both sword and spear; but the king himself dealt him his death-wound,[2] and he fell forward at the king's feet. The king called out then, and bade them cease further slaughter; and they did so.

After this the king bade his men go down to the ships. To Aulvir Hnuf and his brother he said:

'Take ye Thorolf your kinsman and give him honourable burial; bury also the other men who have fallen, and see to the binding of the wounds of those who have hope of life; but let none plunder here, for all this is my property.'

This said, the king went down to his ships, and most of his force with him; and when they were come on board men began to bind their wounds. The king went round the ship and looked at men's wounds; and when he saw a man binding a surface-wound, he said: 'Thorolf gave not that wound; his weapon bites far otherwise; few, methinks, bind the wounds which he gave; and great loss have we in such men.'

As soon as day dawned the king had his sail hoisted, and sailed south as fast as he could. As the day wore on, they came upon many rowing-vessels in all the sounds between the islands; the forces on board them had meant to join Thorolf, for spies of his had been southwards as far as Naumdale, and far and wide about the islands. These had got to know how Hallvard and his brother were come from the south with a large force meaning to attack Thorolf. Hallvard's company had constantly met a head-wind,[3] and had waited about in various havens till news of them had gone the upper way overland, and Thorolf's spies had become aware of it, and this gathering of force was on this account.

The king sailed before a strong wind till he came to Naumdale; there he left the ships behind, and went by land to Throndheim, where he took his own ships that he had left there, and thence stood out to Hlada. These tidings were soon heard, and reached Hallvard and his men where they lay. They then returned to the king, and their voyage was much mocked at.

The brothers Aulvir Hnuf and Eyvind Lambi remained awhile at Sandness and saw to the burial of the slain. To Thorolf's body they gave all the customary honours paid at the burial of a man of wealth and renown, and set over him a memorial stone. They saw also to the healing of the wounded. They arranged also the house with Sigridr; all the stock remained, but most of the house-furniture and table-service and clothing was burnt. And when this was done, they went south and came to king Harold at Throndheim, and were with him for awhile.

They were sad, and spoke little with others. And it was so that one day the brothers went before the king, and Aulvir said:

'This permission we brothers claim of thee, O king, that we go home to our farms; for such things have happened here that we have no heart to share drink[4] and seat with those who drew weapon on our kinsman Thorolf.'

The king looked at them, and answered curtly:

'I will not grant you this; ye shall be here with me.'

They went back to their place.

Next day, as the king sat in the audience hall, he had the brothers called to him, and said:

'Now shall ye know of that your business which ye began with me, craving to go home. Ye have been some while here with me, and have borne you well, and always done your duty. I have thought well of you in everything. Now will I, Eyvind, that thou go north to Halogaland. I will give thee in marriage Sigridr of Sandness, her that Thorolf had to wife; and I will bestow on thee all the wealth that belonged to Thorolf; thou shalt also have my friendship if thou canst keep it. But Aulvir shall remain with me; for his skill as skald I cannot spare him.'

The brothers thanked the king for the honour granted to them, and said that they would willingly accept it.

Then Eyvind made him ready for the journey, getting a good and suitable ship. The king gave him tokens for this matter. His voyage sped well, and he came north to Alost and Sandness. Sigridr welcomed him; and Eyvind then showed her the king's tokens and declared his errand, and asked her in marriage, saying that it was the king's message that he should obtain this match. But Sigridr saw that her only choice, as things had gone, was to let the king rule it. So the arrangement was made, and Eyvind married Sigridr, receiving with her the farm at Sandness and all the property that had been Thorolf's. Thus Eyvind was a wealthy man.

The children of Eyvind and Sigridr were Fid Squinter, father of Eyvind Skald-spoiler, and Geirlaug, whom Sighvat Red had to wife. Fid Squinter married Gunnhilda, daughter of earl Halfdan. Her mother was Ingibjorg, daughter of king Harold Fairhair. Eyvind Lambi kept the king's friendship so long as they both lived.

References

  1. slá mannhring um stofuna: „Wenn man den Wortlaut vergleicht, kommen auffällige Parallelen zutage: „sló mannhring um stofuna“ (Hkr. II, bls.302). Grjótgarðr läuft hinaus und will den König töten. In der Dämmerung verwechselte er ihn aber mit einem Gefolgsmann des Königs, Arnbjörn Árnason (dem Bruder von Kálfr). Es ist bemerkenswert wie die kurze Geschichte von Grjótgarðr dem Bericht von Þórólfs Lebensende ähnelt.“ Baldur Hafstað. Das Verhältnis zwischen der Heimskringla und der Egils saga (p. 77).
  2. death-wound: "In this case an inexperienced Haraldr has multiplied his problems with his power, in particular the problems of facing rival claims for his favour and the readiness of some subjects to manipulate his favour for their personal ends. Such problems in fact would thrive upon the fact of his otherwise being a successful and effective king in enforcing his will through battle. His skill in this respect is particularly clear in his slaying of Þórólfr: it may be the wrong thing to do, but he does it in a sure and certain manner." Hines, John. Kingship in Egils saga (p. 22).
  3. Hallvard's company had constantly met a head-wind: " þeir Snarfari og Harðfari er áður voru sagðir hvatfærri en aðrir menn í skipsförum, komust nú hvergi leiðar sinnar og urðu loks að snúa aftur við lítinn orðstír." Finnbogi Guðmundsson. Gamansemi Egluhöfundar (p. 66).
  4. we have no heart to share drink: "In seinem (Ölvirs) Lebenslauf wird eine Entwicklung deutlich: Anfänglich is Ölvir vom Glanz des Königshofes beeindruckt und erweist sich als treuer Gefolgsmann des Königs, doch später stellt er die Werte von Freundschaft und Verwandtschaft höher, was folgerichtig zu einer gewissen Skepsis dem König gegenüber führt." Baldur Hafstað. Das Dilemma des Gefolgsmannes: Freundschaft in der Egils saga (pp. 23-4).

Kafli 22

Fall Þórólfs Kveld-Úlfssonar

Haraldur konungur sat þá á Hlöðum er þeir Hallvarður fóru á brott og þegar jafnskjótt bjóst konungur sem skyndilegast og gekk á skip sín og reru þeir inn eftir firði um Skarnssund og svo um Beitsjó inn til Eldueiðs. Lét hann þar eftir skipin og fór norður um eiðið til Naumudals og tók hann þar langskip er bændur áttu og gekk hann þar á með lið sitt. Hafði hann hirð sína og nær þremur hundruðum manna. Hann hafði fimm skip eða sex og öll stór. Þeir tóku andviðri hvasst og reru nótt og dag svo sem ganga mátti. Nótt var þá farljós.

Þeir komu aftan dags til Sandness eftir sólarfall og sá þar fyrir bænum fljóta langskip mikið og tjaldað yfir. Þar kenndu þeir skip það er Þórólfur átti. Hafði hann það látið búa og ætlaði af landi á brott en þá hafði hann heita látið fararmungát sitt. Konungur bað menn ganga af skipum gersamlega. Lét hann fara upp merki sitt. Skammt var að ganga til bæjarins en varðmenn Þórólfs sátu inni við drykkju og voru eigi gengnir á vörðinn og var engi maður úti. Sat allt lið inni við drykkju.

Konungur lét slá mannhring um stofuna.[1] Lustu þeir þá upp herópi og var blásið í konungslúður herblástur. En er þeir Þórólfur heyra það hljópu þeir til vopna því að hvers manns alvæpni hékk yfir rúmi hans. Konungur lét kalla að stofunni og bað ganga út konur og ungmenni og gamalmenni, þræla og mansmenn.

Síðan gekk út Sigríður húsfreyja og með henni konur þær er inni voru og aðrir þeir menn er útganga var lofuð. Sigríður spurði eftir ef þeir væru þar synir Berðlu-Kára. Þeir gengu fram báðir og spurðu hvað hún vildi þeim.

„Fylgið mér til konungs,“ sagði hún.

Þeir gerðu svo. En er hún kom til konungs þá spurði hún: „Skal nokkuð um sættir tjóa að leita herra með ykkur Þórólfi?“

Konungur svarar: „Vill Þórólfur upp gefast og ganga á vald mitt til miskunnar og mun hann halda lífi og limum en menn hans munu sæta refsingum svo sem sakir falla til.“

Síðan gekk Ölvir hnúfa til stofunnar og lét kalla Þórólf til máls við sig. Hann sagði honum þann kost er konungur gerði.

Þórólfur svarar: „Enga vil eg nauðungarsætt taka af konungi. Bið þú konung gefa oss útgöngu. Látum þá skeika að sköpuðu.“

Ölvir gekk til konungs og sagði hvers Þórólfur beiddist.

Konungur sagði: „Berið eld að stofunni. Ekki vil eg berjast við þá og týna liði mínu. Veit eg að Þórólfur mun gera oss mannskaða mikinn ef vér skulum sækja hann þar, er hann mun seint að vinna inni þótt hann hafi lið minna en vér.“

Síðan var eldur borinn að stofunni og sóttist það skjótt því að timbrið var þurrt og bræddur viðurinn en næfrum þakið um ræfrið. Þórólfur bað menn sína brjóta upp bálkinn er var milli stofunnar og forstofunnar og sóttist það skjótt. En er þeir náðu timburstokknum þá tóku svo margir stokkinn einn sem á fengu haldið og skutu öðrum endanum í hyrningina svo hart að nafarnar hrutu af fyrir utan og hljópu í sundur veggirnir svo að þar var útgangur mikill. Gekk þar Þórólfur fyrstur út og þá Þorgils gjallandi og svo hver eftir annan.

Tókst þá bardaginn og var það um hríð að stofan gætti á bak þeim Þórólfi en er hún tók að brenna þá sótti eldurinn að þeim. Féll þá og margt lið þeirra. Þá hljóp Þórólfur fram og hjó til beggja handa, sótti þangað að er merki konungs var. Þá féll Þorgils gjallandi. En er Þórólfur kom fram að skjaldborginni lagði hann sverði í gegnum þann mann er merkið bar.

Þá mælti Þórólfur: „Nú gekk eg þremur fótum til skammt.“

Þá stóðu á honum bæði sverð og spjót en sjálfur konungur veitti honum banasár[2] og féll Þórólfur fram á fætur konungi. Þá kallaði konungur og bað hætta að drepa fleiri menn og var þá svo gert.

Síðan bað konungur menn sína fara ofan til skipa. Hann mælti við Ölvi og þá bræður: „Takið nú Þórólf frænda ykkarn og veitið honum umbúnað sæmilegan, og svo öðrum mönnum er hér eru fallnir, og veitið þeim gröft, en látið binda sár manna þeirra er lífvænir eru, en ekki skal hér ræna því að þetta er allt mitt fé.“

Síðan gekk konungur ofan til skipanna og flest lið með honum en er þeir voru á skip komnir þá tóku menn að binda sár sín.

Konungur gekk um skipið og leit á sár manna. Hann sá hvar maður batt svöðusár eitt. Konungur sagði að ekki hafði Þórólfur veitt það sár „og allt bitu honum annan veg vopnin. Fáir ætla eg að þau bindi sárin er hann veitti og skaði mikill er eftir menn slíka.“

En þegar að morgni dags lét konungur draga segl sín og sigldi suður sem af tók. En er á leið daginn þá fundu þeir konungur róðrarskip mörg í hverju eyjarsundi og hafði lið það ætlað til fundar við Þórólf því að njósnir hans höfðu verið allt suður í Naumudal og víða um eyjar. Höfðu þeir orðið vísir að þeir Hallvarður bræður voru komnir sunnan með lið mikið og ætluðu að Þórólfi. Höfðu þeir Hallvarður haft jafnan andviðri[3] og höfðu þeir dvalist í ýmsum höfnum, til þess er njósn hafði farið hið efra um land og höfðu þess orðið varir njósnarmenn Þórólfs og hafði þetta herhlaup fyrir þá sök verið.

Konungur sigldi hraðbyrja til þess er hann kom í Naumudal, lét þar skipin eftir en hann fór landveg í Þrándheim. Tók hann þar skip sín sem hann hafði eftir látið, hélt þá liðinu út til Hlaða. Spurðust brátt þessi tíðindi og komu fyrir þá Hallvarð þar er þeir lágu. Sneru þeir þá aftur til konungs og þótti þeirra ferð heldur hæðileg.

Þeir bræður Ölvir hnúfa og Eyvindur lambi dvöldust um hríð á Sandnesi. Létu þeir búa um val þann er þar hafði fallið. Bjuggu þeir um lík Þórólfs eftir siðvenju svo sem títt var að búa um lík göfugra manna, settu eftir hann bautasteina. Þeir létu græða sjúka menn. Þeir skipuðu og til bús með Sigríði. Var þar eftir allur fjárafli en mestur hafði inni brunnið húsbúnaður og borðbúnaður og klæðnaður manna.

En er þeir bræður voru búnir þá fóru þeir norðan og komu á fund Haralds konungs er hann var í Þrándheimi og voru með honum um hríð. Þeir voru hljóðir og mæltu fátt við menn.

Það var einhvern dag að þeir bræður gengu fyrir konung. Þá mælti Ölvir: „Þess orlofs viljum við bræður þig biðja konungur að þú lofir okkur heimferð til búa okkarra því að hér hafa þau tíðindi gerst er við berum eigi skaplyndi til að eiga drykk[4] og sess við þá menn er báru vopn á Þórólf frænda okkarn.“

Konungur leit við honum og svarar heldur stutt: „Eigi mun eg það lofa ykkur. Hér skuluð þið vera með mér.“ Þeir bræður gengu í brott og aftur til sætis síns.

Annan dag eftir sat konungur í málstofu, lét kalla þangað þá Ölvi bræður.

„Nú skuluð þið vita,“ segir konungur, „um erindi það er þið hófuð við mig og beiddust heimferðar. Hafið þið verið hér um hríð með mér og verið vel siðaðir. Hafið þið vel jafnan dugað. Hefir mér til ykkar allir hlutir vel hugnað. Nú vil eg Eyvindur að þú farir norður á Hálogaland. Vil eg gifta þér Sigríði á Sandnesi, konu þá er Þórólfur hafði átt. Vil eg gefa þér fé það allt er Þórólfur átti. Skaltu þar hafa með vináttu mína ef þú kannt til gæta. En Ölvir skal mér fylgja. Vil eg hann eigi lausan láta fyrir sakar íþrótta hans.“

Þeir bræður þökkuðu konungi þann sóma er hann veitti þeim, sögðu að þeir vildu það fúslega þekkjast. Bjóst Eyvindur þá til ferðar, fékk sér gott skip það er honum hæfði. Fékk konungur honum jartegnir sínar til ráðs þessa. Greiddist ferð Eyvindar vel og kom fram norður í Álöst á Sandnesi. Sigríður tók vel við þeim. Síðan bar Eyvindur fram jartegnir konungs og erindi sín fyrir Sigríði og hóf bónorð sitt við hana, sagði að það var konungs orðsending að Eyvindur nái ráði þessu. En Sigríður sá þann einn sinn kost, svo sem þá var komið, að láta konung fyrir ráða. Fór það ráð fram að Eyvindur fékk Sigríðar. Tók hann þá við búi á Sandnesi og við fé því öllu er Þórólfur hafði átt. Var Eyvindur göfugur maður. Voru börn þeirra Finnur skjálgi faðir Eyvindar skáldaspillis og Geirlaug er átti Sighvatur rauði. Finnur hinn skjálgi átti Gunnhildi, dóttur Hálfdanar jarls. Móðir hennar hét Ingibjörg, dóttir Haralds konungs hins hárfagra.

Eyvindur lambi hélst í vináttu við konung meðan þeir lifðu báðir.



Tilvísanir

  1. slá mannhring um stofuna: „Wenn man den Wortlaut vergleicht, kommen auffällige Parallelen zutage: „sló mannhring um stofuna“ (Hkr. II, bls.302). Grjótgarðr läuft hinaus und will den König töten. In der Dämmerung verwechselte er ihn aber mit einem Gefolgsmann des Königs, Arnbjörn Árnason (dem Bruder von Kálfr). Es ist bemerkenswert wie die kurze Geschichte von Grjótgarðr dem Bericht von Þórólfs Lebensende ähnelt.“ Baldur Hafstað. Das Verhältnis zwischen der Heimskringla und der Egils saga (s. 77).
  2. bánasár: "In this case an inexperienced Haraldr has multiplied his problems with his power, in particular the problems of facing rival claims for his favour and the readiness of some subjects to manipulate his favour for their personal ends. Such problems in fact would thrive upon the fact of his otherwise being a successful and effective king in enforcing his will through battle. His skill in this respect is particularly clear in his slaying of Þórólfr: it may be the wrong thing to do, but he does it in a sure and certain manner." Hines, John. Kingship in Egils saga (s. 22).
  3. Höfðu þeir Hallvarður haft jafnan andviðri: " þeir Snarfari og Harðfari er áður voru sagðir hvatfærri en aðrir menn í skipsförum, komust nú hvergi leiðar sinnar og urðu loks að snúa aftur við lítinn orðstír." Finnbogi Guðmundsson. Gamansemi Egluhöfundar (s. 66).
  4. við berum eigi skaplyndi til að eiga drykk: "In seinem (Ölvir) Lebenslauf wird eine Entwicklung deutlich: Anfänglich is Ölvir vom Glanz des Königshofes beeindruckt und erweist sich als treuer Gefolgsmann des Königs, doch später stellt er die Werte von Freundschaft und Verwandtschaft höher, was folgerichtig zu einer gewissen Skepsis dem König gegenüber führt." Baldur Hafstað. Das Dilemma des Gefolgsmannes: Freundschaft in der Egils saga (s. 23-4).

Links

Personal tools