Egla, 25

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 25

Skallagrim's journey to the king

Skallagrim made him ready for this journey, choosing out of his household and neighbours the strongest and doughtiest that were to be found. One was Ani, a wealthy landowner, another Grani, a third Grimolf and his brother Grim, house-carles these of Skallagrim, and the two brothers Thorbjorn Krum and Thord Beigaldi. These were called Thororna's sons; she dwelt hard by Skallagrim, and was of magic skill. Beigaldi was a coal-biter. There was a man named Thorir Giant, and his brother Thorgeir Earthlong, Odd Lonedweller, and Griss Freedman. Twelve there were for the journey, all stalwart men, and several of them shape-strong.

They took a rowing-ship of Skallagrim's, went southwards along the coast, stood in to Ostra Firth, then travelled by land up to Vors to the lake there; and, their course lying so that they must cross it, they got a suitable rowing-ship and ferried them over, whence they had not very far to go to the farm where the king was being entertained.

They came there at the time when the king was gone to table. Some men they found to speak with outside in the yard, and asked what was going on. This being told them, Grim begged one to call Aulvir Hnuf to speak with him. The man went into the room and up to where Aulvir sat, and said: 'There be men here outside newly come, twelve together, if men one may call them, for they are liker to giants in stature and semblance than to mortal men.'

Aulvir at once rose and went out, for he knew who they were who had come. He greeted well his kinsman Grim, and bade him go with him into the room.

Grim said to his comrades: Tis the custom here that men go weaponless before the king; six of us shall go in, the other six shall bide without and keep our weapons.'

Then they entered, and Aulvir went up to the king, Skallagrim standing at his back. Aulvir was spokesman: 'Here now is come Grim Kveldulf's son; we shall feel thankful to thee, O king, if thou make his journey hither a good one, as we hope it will be. Many get great honour from thee to whom less is due, and who are not nearly so accomplished as is he in every kind of skill. Thou wilt also do this because it is a matter of moment to me, if that is of any worth in thy opinion.'

Aulvir spoke fully and fluently, for he was a man ready of words. And many other friends of Aulvir went before the king and pleaded this cause.

The king looked round, and saw that a man stood at Aulvir's back taller than the others by a head, and bald.

'Is that Skallagrim,' asked the king, 'that tall man?'

Grim said he guessed rightly.

'I will then,' said the king, 'if thou cravest atonement for Thorolf, that thou become my liege-man, and enter my guard here and serve me. Maybe I shall so like thy service that I shall grant thee atonement for thy brother, or other honour not less than I granted him; but thou must know how to keep it better than he did, if I make thee as great a man as was he.'

Skallagrim answered: 'It is well known how far superior to me was Thorolf in every point, and he got no luck by serving thee, O king. Now will I not take that counsel; serve thee I will not,[1] for I know I should get no luck by yielding thee such service as I should wish and as would be worthy. Methinks I should fail herein more than Thorolf.'[2][3]

The king was silent, and his face became blood-red. Aulvir at once turned away, and bade Grim and his men go out. They did so. They went out, and took their weapons, and Aulvir bade them begone with all haste. He and many with him escorted them to the water-side. Before parting with Skallagrim, Aulvir said:

'Kinsman, thy journey to the king ended otherwise than I would have chosen. I urged much thy coming hither; now, I entreat thee, go home with all speed, and come not in the way of king Harold, unless there be better agreement between you than now seems likely, and keep thee well from the king and from his men.'

Then Grim and his company went over the water; but Aulvir with his men, going to the ships drawn up by the water-side, so hacked them about that none was fit to launch. For they saw men coming down from the king's house, a large body well armed and advancing furiously. These men king Harold had sent after them to slay Grim. The king had found words soon after Grim went out, and said:

'This I see in that tall baldhead:[4] that he is brim full of wolfishness,[5] and he will, if he can reach them, work scathe on men whom we should be loth to lose. Ye may be sure, ye against whom he may bear a grudge, that he will spare none, if he get a chance. Wherefore go after him and slay him.'

Upon this they went and came to the water, and saw no ship there fit to launch. So they went back and told the king of their journey, and that Grim and his comrades would now have got clear over the lake.

Skallagrim went his way with his comrades till he reached home; he then told Kveldulf of this journey. Kveldulf showed him well pleased that Skallagrim had not gone to the king on this errand to take service under him; he still said, as before, that from the king they would get only loss and no amends. Kveldulf and Skallagrim spoke often of their plans, and on this they were agreed, that they would not be able to remain in the land any more than other men who were at enmity with the king, but their counsel must be to go abroad.[6] And it seemed to them desirable to seek Iceland,[7] for good reports were given about choice of land there. Already friends and acquaintances of theirs had gone thither - to wit, Ingolf Arnarson, and his companions - and had taken to them land and homestead in Iceland. Men might take land there free of cost, and choose their homestead at will.

So they quite settled to break up their household and go abroad.[8]


Thorir Hroaldson had in his childhood been fostered with Kveldulf, and he and Skallagrim were about of an age, and as foster-brothers were dear friends. Thorir had become a baron of the king's at the time when the events just told happened, but the friendship between him and Skallagrim continued.

Early in the spring Kveldulf and his company made ready their ships. They had plenty of good craft to choose from; they made ready two large ships of burden, and took in each thirty able-bodied men, besides women and children. All the movable goods that they could carry they took with them, but their lands none dared buy, for fear of the king's power. And when they were ready, they sailed away: first to the islands called Solundir, which are many and large, and so scored with bays that few men (it is said) know all their havens.

References

  1. serve thee I will not: " Egils saga is, of course, the primary example of an Icelandic saga that seems directly hostile to the institution of kingship. In Egils saga, those who serve kings loyally (the two men named Þórólfr) perish, whereas those who either refuse to serve any king (Skalla-Grímur) or the Norwegian king in particular (Egill) enjoy good fortune in life. This is very much contrary to how things work out in Laxdæla saga or, indeed, most of the sagas. In fact, Egils saga is not a typical family saga in this respect." Ármann Jakobsson. Royal Pretenders and Faithful Retainers (s. 50).
  2. Methinks I should fail herein more than Thorolf.: "Þetta svar er tvírætt. Nærtækast er að skilja að svo að Skalla-Grímur sé að sýna konungi lítillæti og telji sig ekki verðan að þjóna honum þar sem Þórólfi bróður hans, sem þó var Skalla-Grími fremri, tókst það ekki svo að konungi líkaði. Sá sem þekkir til samskipta Þórólfs og Haralds kemst þó ekki hjá að láta sér detta í hug að annað búi undir orðum Skalla-Gríms, því það var Haraldur sjálfur sem veitti Þórólfi banasár (392). Raunar kemur vart annað til greina en að þjónustan, sem Grímur vill veita konungi – og telur að hann eigi skilið að fá – sé að drepa hann. Þetta staðfestist af seinustu setningu hans („Hygg ég að mér verði meiri muna vant en Þórólfi“) sem glöggir lesendur átta sig á að vísar til andlátsorða Þórólfs" Torfi H. Tulinius. Mun konungi eg þykja ekki orðsnjallur (p. 110).
  3. I should fail herein more than Thorolf.: "Hér hefur þýðandinn bætt inn til skýringar orðunum „zum Dienen“, en með því að gera þetta hefur hann útilokað skírskotun sem felst í orðum Skalla-Gríms til dauða Þórólfs aðeins stuttu áður," Kunz, Keneva. Þýðingar í tíma og rúmi (p. 180).
  4. in that tall baldhead:: "Úlfsnáttúra Skalla-Grims er nú t.d. tengd höfði hans með samspili tvenndarinnar ‘skalli’ og ‘úlfúð’.” Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir. Primum caput: um höfuð Egils Skalla-Grímssonar (p. 76).
  5. brim full of wolfishness: "The reader is made aware of the family resemblance to giants in Chapter 25. […] That Skalla-Grímur has inherited his father‘s theriomorphic tendencies is stressed by the king‘s comment about Grímr‘s "wolfishness"" Grimstad, Kaaren. The Giant as a Heroic Model (p. 286).
  6. go abroad: "The kinds of conflicts and characters that mark the three political sagas (Jómsvikinga, Orkneyinga and Færeyinga) apply well to Egils saga also. The major plot parts of Jómsvikinga saga - a new family of monarchs establishes power; landed men struggle against them; some found a new colony- match the plot parts at the beginning of Egils saga." Berman, Melissa. The Political Sagas (p. 126).
  7. And it seemed to them desirable to seek Iceland: " In the Norwegian mother country, a state came into being, claiming the monopoly of the violence and the coercive use of the force by the country´s overlord. In Iceland, Norwegian emigrant families find breathing room in a society that rejects overlordship and royal monopoly of violence. The surely exaggerated memory of these contrastive developments structures a significant part of the saga´s action. The difference between Iceland and societies under the rule of princes, such as Norway and England, flows through the medieval text as a unifying undercurrent, contributing to the crucial dichotomy between the characters of light and dark brothers." Byock, Jesse L.. Some thoughts on Egils saga and social memory (p. 14).
  8. So they quite settled to break up their household and go abroad.: "The Icelandic sagas tell the story of how Iceland separated from Norway, how it grew into its own, in short, how Iceland became a nation. In the very period in which Iceland experienced growing pressure to unite with Norway, Icelandic writers set themselves the task of creating a narrative of separateness." Andersson, Theodore M.. The King of Iceland (p. 932).

Kafli 25

Ferð Skalla-Gríms á konungs fund

Skalla-Grímur bjóst til ferðar þeirrar er fyrr var frá sagt. Hann valdi sér menn af heimamönnum sínum og nábúum þá er voru sterkastir að afli og hraustastir þeirra er til voru. Maður hét Áni, bóndi einn auðigur. Annar hét Grani, þriðji Grímólfur og Grímur bróðir hans, heimamenn Skalla-Gríms, og þeir bræður Þorbjörn krumur og Þórður beigaldi. Þeir voru kallaðir Þórörnusynir. Hún bjó skammt frá Skalla-Grími og var fjölkunnig. Beigaldi var kolbítur. Einn hét Þórir þurs og bróðir hans Þorgeir jarðlangur. Oddur hét maður einbúi, Grís lausingi. Tólf voru þeir til fararinnar og allir hinir sterkustu menn og margir hamrammir.

Þeir höfðu róðrarferju er Skalla-Grímur átti, fóru suður með landi, lögðu inn í Ostrarfjörðu, fóru þá landveg upp á Vors til vatns þess er þar verður, en leið þeirra bar svo til að þeir skyldu þar yfir fara. Fengu þeir sér róðrarskip það er við þeirra hæfi var, reru síðan yfir vatnið en þá var eigi langt til bæjar þess er konungurinn var á veislu. Komu þeir Grímur þar þann tíma er konungur var genginn til borða. Þeir Grímur hittu menn að máli úti í garðinum og spurðu hvað þar var tíðinda. En er þeim var sagt þá bað Grímur kalla til máls við sig Ölvi hnúfu.

Sá maður gekk inn í stofuna og þar til er Ölvir sat og sagði honum: „Menn eru hér komnir úti tólf saman ef menn skal kalla en líkari eru þeir þursum að vexti og að sýn en mennskum mönnum.“

Ölvir stóð upp þegar og gekk út. Þóttist hann vita hverjir komnir mundu. Fagnaði hann vel Grími frænda sínum og bað hann ganga inn í stofu með sér.

Grímur sagði förunautum sínum: „Það mun hér vera siður að menn gangi vopnlausir fyrir konung. Skulum vér ganga inn sex en aðrir sex skulu vera úti og gæta vopna vorra.“

Síðan ganga þeir inn. Gekk Ölvir fyrir konunginn. Skalla-Grímur stóð að baki honum.

Ölvir tók til máls: „Nú er Grímur hér kominn, sonur Kveld-Úlfs. Kunnum vér nú aufúsu konungur að þér gerið hans för góða hingað svo sem vér væntum að vera muni. Fá þeir margir af yður sæmd mikla er til minna eru komnir en hann og hvergi nær eru jafnvel að sér gervir um flestar íþróttir sem hann mun vera. Máttu þenna hlut svo gera konungur að mér þykir mestu máli skipta ef þér þykir það nokkurs vert.“ Ölvir talaði langt og snjallt því að hann var orðfær maður. Margir aðrir vinir Ölvis gengu fyrir konung og fluttu þetta mál.

Konungur litaðist um. Hann sá að maður stóð að baki Ölvi og var höfði hærri en aðrir menn og sköllóttur.

„Er þetta hann Skalla-Grímur,“ sagði konungur, „hinn mikli maður?“

Grímur sagði að hann kenndi rétt.

„Eg vil þá,“ sagði konungur, „ef þú beiðist bóta fyrir Þórólf að þú gerist minn maður og gangir hér í hirðlög og þjónir mér. Má mér svo vel líka þín þjónusta að eg veiti þér bætur eftir bróður þinn eða aðra sæmd eigi minni en eg veitti honum Þórólfi bróður þínum og skyldir þú betur kunna að gæta en hann ef eg gerði þig að svo miklum manni sem hann var orðinn.“

Skalla-Grímur svarar: „Það var kunnigt hversu miklu Þórólfur var framar en eg er að sér ger um alla hluti og bar hann enga gæfu til að þjóna þér konungur. Nú mun eg ekki taka það ráð. Eigi mun eg þjóna þér[1] því að eg veit að eg mun eigi gæfu til bera að veita þér þá þjónustu sem eg mundi vilja og vert væri. Hygg eg að mér verði meiri muna vant en Þórólfi.“[2][3]

Konungur þagði og setti hann dreyrrauðan á að sjá. Ölvir sneri þegar í brott og bað þá Grím ganga út. Þeir gerðu svo, gengu út og tóku vopn sín. Bað Ölvir þá fara í brott sem skjótast. Gekk Ölvir á leið með þeim til vatnsins og margir menn með honum.

Áður þeir Skalla-Grímur skildust mælti Ölvir: „Annan veg var för þín, Grímur frændi, til konungs en eg mundi kjósa. Fýsti eg þig mjög hingaðfararinnar en nú vil eg hins biðja að þú farir heim sem skyndilegast og þess með að þú komir eigi á fund Haralds konungs nema betri verði sætt ykkur en mér þykir nú á horfast og gæt þín vel fyrir konungi og hans mönnum.“

Síðan fóru þeir Grímur yfir vatnið en þeir Ölvir gengu þar til skip þau voru er upp voru sett við vatnið og hjuggu svo að ekki var fært því að þeir sáu mannför ofan frá konungsbænum. Voru þeir menn margir saman og vopnaðir mjög og fóru æsilega. Þá menn hafði Haraldur konungur sent eftir þeim til þess að drepa Grím.

Hafði konungur tekið til orða litlu síðar en þeir Grímur höfðu út gengið, sagði svo: „Það sé eg á skalla þeim hinum mikla[4] að hann er fullur upp úlfúðar[5] og hann verður að skaða þeim mönnum nokkurum er oss mun þykja afnám í ef hann náir. Megið þér það ætla, þeir menn er hann mun kalla að í sökum séu við hann, að sá skalli mun engvan yðvarn spara ef hann kemst í færi. Farið nú þá eftir honum og drepið hann.“

Síðan fóru þeir og komu til vatnsins og fengu þar engi skip þau er fær væru. Fóru aftur síðan og sögðu konungi sína ferð og svo það að þeir Grímur mundu þá komnir yfir vatnið.

Skalla-Grímur fór leið sína og föruneyti hans til þess er hann kom heim. Sagði Skalla-Grímur Kveld-Úlfi frá ferð þeirra. Kveld-Úlfur lét vel yfir því er Grímur hafði eigi farið til konungs þess erindis að ganga til handa honum, sagði enn sem fyrr að þeir mundu af konungi hljóta skaða einn en enga uppreist.

Kveld-Úlfur og Skalla-Grímur ræddu oft um ráðagerð sína og kom það allt ásamt með þeim, sögðu svo að þeir mundu ekki mega vera þar í landi heldur en aðrir menn þeir er í ósætt væru við konung og mundi þeim hitt ráð að fara af landi á brott[6] og þótti þeim það fýsilegt að leita til Íslands[7] því að þá var sagt þar vel frá landkostum. Þar voru þá komnir vinir þeirra og kunningjar, Ingólfur Arnarson og förunautar hans, og tekið sér landskosti og bústaði á Íslandi. Máttu menn þar nema sér lönd ókeypis og velja bústaði. Staðfestist það helst um ráðagerð þeirra að þeir mundu bregða búi sínu og fara af landi á brott.[8]

Þórir Hróaldsson hafði verið í barnæsku að fóstri með Kveld-Úlfi og voru þeir Skalla-Grímur mjög jafnaldrar. Var þar allkært í fóstbræðralagi. Þórir var orðinn lendur maður konungs er þetta var tíðinda en vinátta þeirra Skalla-Gríms hélst ávallt.

Snemma um vorið bjuggu þeir Kveld-Úlfur skip sín. Þeir höfðu mikinn skipakost og góðan, bjuggu tvo knörru mikla og höfðu á hvorum þrjá tigu manna þeirra er liðfærir voru og umfram konur og ungmenni. Þeir höfðu með sér lausafé allt það er þeir máttu með komast, en jarðir þeirra þorði engi maður að kaupa fyrir ríki konungs.

En er þeir voru búnir þá sigldu þeir í brott. Þeir sigldu í eyjar þær er Sólundir heita. Það eru margar eyjar og stórar og svo mjög vogskornar að það er mælt að þar munu fáir menn vita allar hafnir.


Tilvísanir

  1. Eigi mun eg þjóna þér: " Egils saga is, of course, the primary example of an Icelandic saga that seems directly hostile to the institution of kingship. In Egils saga, those who serve kings loyally (the two men named Þórólfr) perish, whereas those who either refuse to serve any king (Skalla-Grímur) or the Norwegian king in particular (Egill) enjoy good fortune in life. This is very much contrary to how things work out in Laxdæla saga or, indeed, most of the sagas. In fact, Egils saga is not a typical family saga in this respect." Ármann Jakobsson. Royal Pretenders and Faithful Retainers (s. 50).
  2. Hygg eg að mér verði meiri muna vant en Þórólfi.: "Þetta svar er tvírætt. Nærtækast er að skilja að svo að Skalla-Grímur sé að sýna konungi lítillæti og telji sig ekki verðan að þjóna honum þar sem Þórólfi bróður hans, sem þó var Skalla-Grími fremri, tókst það ekki svo að konungi líkaði. Sá sem þekkir til samskipta Þórólfs og Haralds kemst þó ekki hjá að láta sér detta í hug að annað búi undir orðum Skalla-Gríms, því það var Haraldur sjálfur sem veitti Þórólfi banasár (392). Raunar kemur vart annað til greina en að þjónustan, sem Grímur vill veita konungi – og telur að hann eigi skilið að fá – sé að drepa hann. Þetta staðfestist af seinustu setningu hans („Hygg ég að mér verði meiri muna vant en Þórólfi“) sem glöggir lesendur átta sig á að vísar til andlátsorða Þórólfs " Torfi H. Tulinius. Mun konungi eg þykja ekki orðsnjallur (s. 110).
  3. mér verði meiri muna vant en Þórólfi.: "Hér hefur þýðandinn bætt inn til skýringar orðunum „zum Dienen“, en með því að gera þetta hefur hann útilokað skírskotun sem felst í orðum Skalla-Gríms til dauða Þórólfs aðeins stuttu áður," Kunz, Keneva. Þýðingar í tíma og rúmi (s. 180).
  4. skalla þeim hinum mikla: "Úlfsnáttúra Skalla-Grims er nú t.d. tengd höfði hans með samspili tvenndarinnar ‘skalli’ og ‘úlfúð’.” Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir. Primum caput: um höfuð Egils Skalla-Grímssonar (s. 76).
  5. fullur upp úlfúðar: "The reader is made aware of the family resemblance to giants in Chapter 25. […] That Skalla-Grímur has inherited his father‘s theriomorphic tendencies is stressed by the king‘s comment about Grímr‘s "wolfishness"" Grimstad, Kaaren. The Giant as a Heroic Model (s. 286).
  6. fara af landi á brott: "The kinds of conflicts and characters that mark the three political sagas (Jómsvikinga, Orkneyinga and Færeyinga) apply well to Egils saga also. The major plot parts of Jómsvikinga saga - a new family of monarchs establishes power; landed men struggle against them; some found a new colony- match the plot parts at the beginning of Egils saga." Berman, Melissa. The Political Sagas (s. 126).
  7. þótti þeim það fýsilegt að leita til Íslands : " In the Norwegian mother country, a state came into being, claiming the monopoly of the violence and the coercive use of the force by the country´s overlord. In Iceland, Norwegian emigrant families find breathing room in a society that rejects overlordship and royal monopoly of violence. The surely exaggerated memory of these contrastive developments structures a significant part of the saga´s action. The difference between Iceland and societies under the rule of princes, such as Norway and England, flows through the medieval text as a unifying undercurrent, contributing to the crucial dichotomy between the characters of light and dark brothers." Byock, Jesse L.. Some thoughts on Egils saga and social memory (s. 14).
  8. Staðfestist það helst um ráðagerð þeirra að þeir mundu bregða búi sínu og fara af landi á brott.: "The Icelandic sagas tell the story of how Iceland separated from Norway, how it grew into its own, in short, how Iceland became a nation. In the very period in which Iceland experienced growing pressure to unite with Norway, Icelandic writers set themselves the task of creating a narrative of separateness." Andersson, Theodore M.. The King of Iceland (s. 932).

Links

Personal tools