Egla, 59

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 59

King Eric slays his brothers

Harold Fairhair[1] set his sons to rule in Norway when he began to grow old: Eric he made king above all his other sons. It was when Harold had been king for seventy years that he gave over the kingdom into the hands of his son Eric. At that time Gunnhilda bare a son, whom Harold the king sprinkled with water, giving him his own name; and he added this that he should be king after his father if he lived long enough. King Harold then settled down in retirement, being mostly in Rogaland or Hordaland. But three years later king Harold died in Rogaland, and a mound was raised to his memory by Haugasound.

After the death of the king there was great strife between his sons, for the men of Vik took Olaf for their king, but the Thronds Sigurd. But these two, his brothers, Eric slew at Tunsberg, one year after king Harold's death. All these things happened in one and the same summer, to wit, king Eric's going with his army eastwards to Vik to fight with his brothers, and (before that) the strife of Egil and Bergonund at the Gula-thing, with the other events that have just been related.

Bergonund remained at home on his estate when the king went to the war, for he thought it unsafe for him to leave home while Egil was still in the land. Hadd, his brother, was now there with him. There was a man named Frodi, a kinsman of king Eric, very handsome, young in years, but a man grown. King Eric left him behind to protect Bergonund. Frodi was staying at Alrekstead, a royal farm, and had some men there. A son of Eric and Gunnhilda there was named Rognvald, who was then ten or eleven years old, and had the makings of a very handsome man. He was with Frodi when these things happened. But before king Eric rowed forth to this war, he made Egil an outlaw through all Norway, and free for any man to slay. Arinbjorn was with the king in the war; but before he left home Egil took his ship to sea, and made for the outlying fishing station called Vitar, over against Aldi. It is on the high road of the seas: fishermen were there, and 'twas a good place for hearing tidings. Then he heard that the king had made him an outlaw. Whereupon Egil sang a stave:

'Law-breaker, land-demon,
Long voyage lays on me;
He bane of his brothers,
Beguiled by his bride.
Gunnhilda the guilt bears
(Grim queen) of my exile:
Fain am I full swiftly
Her frauds to repay.'

The weather was calm, a fell-wind blew by night, a sea breeze by day. One evening Egil sailed out to sea, but the fishermen were then rowing in to land, those, to wit, who had been set as spies on Egil's movements. They had this to tell, that Egil had put out and sailed to sea, and was gone. This news they carried to Bergonund. And when he knew these tidings, then he sent away all those men that he had had before for protection. Thereafter he rowed in to Alrekstead, and bade Frodi to his house, for he had a great ale-drinking there. Frodi went with him, taking some men. They were feasted well there, and they made merry, with no fear of danger. Rognvald, the king's son, had a pinnace, rowed by six men on either side, painted all above the sea line. He had with him ten or twelve who constantly followed him; and when Frodi had left home, then Rognvald took the pinnace and they rowed out to Herdla twelve in number. A large farm of the king's was there, whereof the manager was named Skegg-Thorir. Rognvald in his childhood had been fostered there. Thorir received the king's son joyfully. There too was no lack of drink.

Egil sailed out to sea for the night, as was written above. And when morning came the wind fell and there was a calm. They then lay drifting, letting the ship ride free for some nights. But when a sea-breeze came on, Egil said to his shipmen, 'We will now sail to land, for I do not quite know, should the sea-wind come to blow hard, where we could make land, 'tis a dangerous-looking coast in most places.' The rowers bade Egil rule their course.

So then they made sail, and sailed into the waters about Herdla. There they found a good haven, and spread the tent over their ship, and lay there for the night. They had on the ship a little boat, into which went Egil with three men. They rowed into Herdla, and sent a man up into the island to learn tidings; and when he came down to the ship, he said that there at the farm was Rognvald, the king's son, and his men. 'They sate there a-drinking,' said he. 'I lit on one of the house-carles; he was ale-mad, and said that here they must not drink less than was drunk at Bergonund's, though Frodi was feasting there with a party of five. He said that no more were there than the house-hold, save Frodi and his men.'

Whereupon Egil rowed back to the ship, and bade the men rise and take their weapons. They did so. The ship they put out from the shore and anchored. Egil left twelve men to guard the ship, but himself went on the ship's boat, they being eighteen in all; they then rowed in along the sound. They so regulated their pace that they came to Fenhring at eventide, and put into a hidden creek there. Then said Egil: 'Now will I go up into the island and spy out what I can get to know; but you shall await me here.'

Egil had his weapons that he was wont to have, a helm and shield, a sword at his girdle, a halberd in his hand. He went up into the island and along the border of a wood. He had now drawn a hood[2] y over his helm. He came where there were some lads, and with them large sheep-dogs. And when they began to exchange words, he asked whence they were, and why they were there, and had such big dogs. They said: 'You must be a very silly fellow; have you not heard that a bear goes about the island here, a great pest? He kills both men and sheep, and a price is set upon his head. We watch here at Askr every night over our flocks that are penned in the fold. By why go you at night thus armed?'

He answered: 'I, too, am afraid of the bear; and few, methinks, now go weaponless. He has long pursued me to-night. See there now, where he is in the skirt of the wood! Are all asleep at this farmhouse?'

The boy said that Bergonund and Frodi would be drinking still; 'they sit at it every night.'

'Then tell them,' said Egil, 'where the bear is; but I will hasten home.'

So he went away; but the boy ran home to the farmhouse, and into the room where they were drinking. All had gone to sleep save these three, Onund, Frodi, and Hadd. The boy told them where the bear was. They took their weapons which hung there by them, and at once ran out and up to the wood.

From the main forest ran out a spur of wood with scattered bushes. The boy told them where the bear had been in the bushes. Then they saw that the branches moved, whence they guessed that the bear would be there. Then Bergonund advised that Hadd and Frodi should run forward between the shrubs and the main forest, and stop the bear from gaining the wood. Bergonund ran forward to the bushes. He had helm and shield, a sword at his girdle, a halberd in his hand. Egil was there before him in the bushes, but no bear.

And when he saw where Bergonund was, he unsheathed his sword, and, taking the coil of cord attached to the hilt, would it round his arm, and so let the sword hang. In his hand he grasped his halberd, and then ran forward to meet Bergonund. Which when Bergonund saw, he quickened his pace and cast his shield before him, and ere they met each hurled his halberd at the other.

Egil opposed the halberd with shield held aslant, so that the halberd with a cut tore out of the shield and flew into the ground. But Egil's weapon came full on the middle of the shield, and went right through it far up the blade, and the weapon was fast in the shield. Onund's shield was thus cumbersome. Then quickly did Egil grasp his sword-hilt. Onund also began to draw his sword; but ere it was half drawn Egil pierced him with a thrust. Onund reeled at the blow; but Egil suddenly snatched back his sword, and made a cut at Onund, well-nigh taking off his head. Then Egil took his halberd out of the shield.

Now Hadd and Frodi saw Bergonund's fall, and ran thither. Egil turned to meet them. At Frodi he threw his halberd, which, piercing the shield, went into his breast and out at his back. At once he fell back dead. Then, taking his sword, Egil turned against Hadd, and they exchanged but few blows ere Hadd fell. Just then the herd-boys chanced to come up. Egil said to them: 'Watch you here by Onund your master and his friends, that no beast or bird tear their bodies.'

Egil then went his way, and before long eleven of his comrades met him, six staying to watch the ship. They asked him what success he had had. Whereupon he sang:

'Long did we losers sit,
Losers through him who took
With greed the gold that once
To guard I better knew:
Till now Bergonund's bane
My blade with wounds hath wrought,
And hidden earth in veil
Of Hadd's and Frodi's blood.'

Then Egil said: 'We will now turn back to the farm, and act in warlike-wise, slaying all the men we can, and taking all the booty we can come by.'

They went to the farm, rushed into the house, and slew there fifteen or sixteen men. Some escaped by running away. They plundered the place, destroying what they could not take with them. The cattle they drove to the shore and slaughtered, putting on board as much as the boat would hold; then they rowed out by the sound between the islands. Egil was now furious, so that there was no speaking with him. He sat at the boat's helm.

And when they got further out in the firth towards Herdla, then came rowing out towards them Rognvald the king's son with twelve more on the painted pinnace. They had now learnt that Egil's ship lay in Herdla-water, and they meant to take to Onund news of Egil's whereabouts. And when Egil saw the boat, he knew it at once. Straight for it he steered; and when the boats came together, the beak of the cutter struck the side of the pinnace's bow, which so heeled over that the water poured in on one side and the boat filled. Egil leapt aboard, grasping his halberd, and cried to his men to let no one in the pinnace escape with life. This was easy, for there was no defence. All were slain as they swam, none escaped. Thirteen there perished,[3] Rognvald and his comrades. Then Egil and his men rowed to Herdla island, and Egil sang a stave:

'I fought, nor feared vengeance;
Falchion there reddened
Blood of son of Bloodaxe,
Bold king, and his queen.[4]
Perish'd on one pinnace
Prince with twelve his liege-men,
Such stress of stern battle
Against them I stirred.'

And when Egil and his men came to Herdla, at once fully armed they ran up to the farm buildings. But when Thorir and his household saw that, they at once ran away and saved themselves, all that could go, men and women. Egil's party plundered the place of all they could lay hands on; then they rowed out to their ship. Nor had they long to wait ere a breeze blew off the land. They made ready to sail.

And when all was ready for sailing, Egil went up into the island. He took in his hand a hazel-pole, and went to a rocky eminence that looked inward to the mainland. Then he took a horse's head[5] and fixed it on the pole.[6] After that, in solemn form of curse, he thus spake: 'Here set I up a curse-pole, and this curse I turn on king Eric[7] and queen Gunnhilda. (Here he turned the horse's head landwards.) This curse I turn[8] also on the guardian-spirits who dwell in this land, that they may all wander astray,[9] nor reach or find their home till they have driven out of the land[10] king Eric and Gunnhilda.'

This spoken, he planted the pole down in a rift of the rock, and let it stand there. The horse's head he turned inwards to the mainland; but on the pole he cut runes,[11] expressing the whole form of curse.[12]

After this Egil went aboard the ship. They made sail, and sailed out to sea. Soon the breeze freshened, and blew strong from a good quarter; so the ship ran on apace. Then sang Egil:

'Forest-foe,[13] fiercely blowing,
Flogs hard and unceasing
With sharp storm the sea-way
That ship's stern doth plow.
The wind, willow-render,
With icy gust ruthless
Our sea-swan doth buffet
O'er bowsprit and beak.'

Their voyage sped well; from the main they came into Borgar-firth, brought their ship into the haven, carried their baggage on shore. Egil then went home to Borg; but his crew found them lodging. Skallagrim was now old and weak with age. Egil took the management of the property and care of the house.

References

  1. Harold Fairhair: "Egilssaga 163-64 virðist vera útdráttur úr því sem segir í Heimskringlu 146-9. Þeir sem um það efast skyldu gaumgæfa hversu hin stutta frásögn Eglu af Haraldi og sonum hans er fleyguð inn í lengri frásagnir af viðureign Egils við Berg-Önund" Jónas Kristjánsson. Egilssaga og konungasögur (p. 467).
  2. drawn a hood: "On two occasions Egil, wishing to pass unrecognized, travels with hǫtt síðan drawn over his helmet. A natural enough disguise, admittedly, but is it merely coincidence that the hood is also Oðin’s usual dress when he appears among men? Just as remarkable is the likeness in temperament between Egil and his god." Wright, Dorena Allen. The Skald as Saga-Hero (p. 15).
  3. Thirteen there perished: "Nú fær það vissulega ekki staðizt að Egill hafi drepið son Eríks og Gunnhildar […] Auk þess verður að telja gersamlega óhugsandi að Eríkur – og þaðan af síður Gunnhildur – hefði látið sonarbana sinn ganga sér lifandi úr greipum aðeins tveimur árum síðar, hver beygur sem þeim stóð af honum. Engin önnur kvæði né lausavísur Egils sem varðveitzt hafa víkja heldur að þessu atviki." Pétur Benediktsson. Hvers vegna orti Egill Höfuðlausn? (pp. 9-10).
  4. Bold king, and his queen: "Besondere Beachtung verdienen die Strophen 28 und 29 (der neueren Ausgaben), die gegen König Erich und seine Frau Gunnhild gerichtet sind und – wie der Norweger Magnus Olsen vermutet – auf die Neidstange geritzt worden sind." Schier, Kurt. Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (p. 2989).
  5. took a horse's head: "If the head was a source of wisdom, it was also a source of destructive power. This is illustrated by the Norse ‘stake of scorn’. This was a pole surmounted by a mutilated horse head. Runes were carved on the stake and the whole device set up and turned towards the victim’s home. In Egil’s Saga we are given some of the words to be uttered. ... The stake of scorn or something like it was still known in Scandinavia as late as the mid-sixteenth century. This is clearly shown by a picture in ‘De Gentibus Septentrionalibus’ by Olaus Magnus, published in 1555." Smith, A.W. The Luck in the Head: A Problem in English Folklore (p. 21-22).
  6. he took a horse's head and fixed it on the pole: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] "Þar reisti hann upp stöng og setti höfuð kóngssonar á hana ofan...“ Indeed, he [the author of “New Egil’s Saga”] even adds to the harrowing account of the ‘scorn-pole’ (119: níðstöng, 171) the detail that it was the head of Rognvald, the king’s son, that Egil mounted on the pole,” Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (p. 188).
  7. turn on king Eric: "Egill’s effort to manipulate circumstances to his advantage include a coercive summons of supernatural powers, a demand that the spirits of the land banish the royal pair. It is of interest that the erection of the pole is NOT accompanied by verse, despite earlier defamatory stanzas on Eirikr and Gunnhildr." Sayers, William. Poetry and social agency in Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar (p. 44).
  8. curse I turn: "In Egils saga, the magical aspect of the practice of níð is emphasized, placing it in the context of other mystical powers derived from the pagan religion, such as the skilled use of runes, which the poet has at his command.” Finlay, Alison. Egils saga and other poets’ sagas (p. 38).
  9. that they may all wander astray: "In Landnámabók S. 299 wird unter Ulfliots Gesetzen, die 928 gegeben wurden, dieses angeführt: niemand solle ein Meer-schiff haben mit einem Haupte darauf, und habe er dergleichen, so solle man das Haupt nehmen, ehe es ins Gesicht des Landes komme, und nicht heranfahren mit gähnenden Haüptern oder offenen Rachen, um die Landvätter nicht zu erschrecken." Glückselig, Anton Thormod. Skaldenlieder aus der Egils-Saga (p. 176).
  10. out of the land: " Egill drove Eric Blood-Axe and Gunnhilda out of the land by the means of runes that he carved in a wooden pole and, as Magnus Olsen has shown, in the construction of his niðvísa, the magic line of the younger rune series, which was also meaningful to Varinn [i.e. the dedicant of the Rök inscription] among the older ones, plays a role." Franz, L. Egils ‘Sonatorrek’ und die Inschrift von Rök (p. 5)
  11. he cut runes: “The poet’s mastery of runic magic can also be seen as having its parallel in the miracle-working powers of saints, and it is in this sphere, as well as in his níð-verses directed against the tyrannous Eiríkr bloodaxe, that Egill uses his poetic gifts for positive good.” Clunies Ross, Margaret. A Tale of Two Poets (s. 140).
  12. whole form of curse: "It is therefore evident that the formáli is Egil’s text carved on the stick, namely the inscription, and that the words are then repeated by the present people, while allowing to suppose this is a sheer solemn declaration." Meli, Marcello. Rune e magia nella saga di Egill (p. 331).
  13. forest-foe: "Ef 6. erindi Þórsdrápu og siglingavísa Egils eru bornar saman, má segja að líkingin í erindi Egils sé eins og laufgað tré, sem í vísu Egils sé búið að vinna í heflað timbur. Mér virðist með öðrum orðum, að hugmyndin í siglingavísu Egils gæti verið sótt í 6. erindi Þórsdrápu." Ólafur Halldórsson. Þél hreggi höggvin (p. 192).

Kafli 59

Eiríkur konungur drap bræður sína

Haraldur hinn hárfagri[1] setti sonu sína til ríkis í Noregi þá er hann tók að eldast, gerði Eirík konung yfirkonung sona sinna allra. Og er Haraldur hafði verið sjö tigu vetra konungur þá seldi hann í hendur Eiríki syni sínum ríki. Í þann tíma ól Gunnhildur son og jós Haraldur konungur vatni og gaf nafn sitt og lét það fylgja að hann skyldi konungur vera eftir föður sinn ef honum entist aldur til. Haraldur konungur settist þá í kyrrsetu og sat oftast á Rogalandi eða Hörðalandi. En þrem vetrum síðar andaðist Haraldur konungur á Rogalandi og var ger haugur eftir hann við Haugasund.

En eftir andlát hans var deila mikil milli sona hans því að Víkverjar tóku sér til konungs Ólaf en Þrændir Sigurð. En Eiríkur felldi þá báða bræður sína í Túnsbergi einum vetri eftir andlát Haralds konungs. Var það allt á einu sumri er Eiríkur konungur fór af Hörðalandi með her sinn austur í Vík til bardaga við bræður sína og áður höfðu þeir deilt á Gulaþingi Egill og Berg-Önundur og þessi tíðindi er nú var sagt.

Berg-Önundur var heima að búi sínu þá er konungur fór í leiðangur því að honum þótti óvarlegt að fara frá búi sínu meðan Egill var eigi úr landi farinn. Þar var bróðir hans, Haddur, þá með honum.

Fróði hét maður, frændi Eiríks konungs og fósturson hans. Hann var hinn fríðasti maður, ungur að aldri og þó vaxinn maður. Eiríkur konungur setti hann eftir til trausts Berg-Önundi. Sat Fróði á Álreksstöðum að búi konungs og hafði þar sveit manna.

Rögnvaldur er nefndur son Eiríks konungs og Gunnhildar. Hann var þá vetra tíu eða ellefu og var hið fríðasta mannsefni. Hann var þá með Fróða er þetta var tíðinda.

En áður Eiríkur konungur reri þenna leiðangur þá gerði hann Egil útlaga fyrir endilangan Noreg og dræpan hverjum manni. Arinbjörn var með konungi í leiðangri en áður hann fór heiman þá lagði Egill skipi sínu til hafs og hélt í útver það er Vitar heita, út frá Alda. Það er komið af þjóðleið. Þar voru fiskimenn og var þar gott að spyrja tíðindi. Þá spurði hann að konungur hafði gert hann útlaga. Þá kvað Egill vísu:

Lögbrigðir hefir lagða
landálfr, fyr mér sjálfum,
blekkir bræðra sökkva,
brúðfang, vegu langa.
Gunnhildi á ég gjalda,
greypt er hennar skap, þenna,
ungr gat eg og læ launa,
landrekstr, bili granda.

Veður voru vindlítil, fjallvindur um nætur en hafgola um daga. Eitt kveld sigldu þeir Egill út á haf en fiskimenn reru þá inn til lands þeir er til njósnar höfðu settir verið um farar þeirra Egils. Kunnu þeir það að segja að Egill hafði út látið og á haf siglt og hann var á brottu, létu þessa njósn koma til Berg-Önundar. Og er hann vissi þessi tíðindi, hann sendi þá frá sér menn þá alla er hann hafði áður haft þar til varúðar. Reri hann þá inn til Álreksstaða og bauð Fróða til sín því að Berg-Önundur átti öl mikið heima að sín. Fróði fór með honum og hafði með sér nokkura menn. Tóku þeir þar veislu góða og höfðu gleði mikla. Var þar þá allt óttalaust.

Rögnvaldur konungsson átti karfa einn. Reru sex menn á borð. Hann var steindur allur fyrir ofan sjó. Hann hafði með sér menn tíu eða tólf þá er honum fylgdu einart. Og er Fróði var heiman farinn þá tók Rögnvaldur karfann og reru þeir út til Herðlu tólf saman. Þar var konungsbú mikið og réð sá maður fyrir er hét Skegg-Þórir. Þar hafði Rögnvaldur verið á fóstri í barnæsku. Tók Þórir feginsamlega við konungssyni. Skorti þar og eigi drykk mikinn.

Egill sigldi út á haf um nóttina, sem fyrr var ritað, og er morgnaði féll veðrið og gerði logn. Lögðu þeir þá í rétt og létu reiða fyrir nokkurar nætur. En er hafgola kom á sagði Egill skipurum sínum: „Nú munum vér sigla að landi því að ógerla veit, ef hafviðri kemur á hvasst, hvar vér náum þá landi en heldur ófriðvænt fyrir í flestum stöðum.“

Hásetar báðu Egil fyrir ráða þeirra ferð. Síðan tóku þeir til segls og sigldu inn til Herðluvers. Fengu þeir þar góða höfn og tjölduðu yfir skipi sínu og lágu þá um nóttina. Þeir höfðu á skipinu lítinn bát og gekk Egill þar á við þriðja mann. Reri hann þá inn um nóttina til Herðlu, sendi þar mann í eyna upp að spyrja tíðinda. Og er sá kom ofan til skips sagði hann að þar á bænum var Rögnvaldur konungsson og hans menn „sátu þeir þá við drykkju. Hitti eg einn af húskörlum og var sá ölóður og sagði að hér skyldi eigi minna drekka en að Berg-Önundar þótt Fróði væri þar á veislu og þeir fimm saman.“

Ekki kvað hann þar fleira manna en heimamenn nema Fróða og hans menn.

Síðan reri Egill aftur til skips og bað menn upp standa og taka vopn sín. Þeir gerðu svo. Þeir lögðu út skipið um akkeri. Egill lét gæta tólf menn skips en hann fór á eftirbátinn og þeir átján saman, reru síðan inn eftir sundum. Þeir stilltu svo til að þeir komu um kveldið inn í Fenhring og lögðu þar til leynivogs eins.

Þá mælti Egill: „Nú vil eg ganga einn upp í eyna og njósna hvers eg verð vís en þér skuluð bíða mín hér.“

Egill hafði vopn sín þau er hann var vanur að hafa, hjálm og skjöld, gyrður sverði, höggspjót í hendi. Síðan gekk hann upp í eyna og fram með skógi nokkurum. Hann hafði dregið hött síðan[2] yfir hjálm. Hann kom þar að er sveinar nokkurir voru og hjá þeim hjarðtíkur stórar. Og er þeir tókust að orðum spurði hann hvaðan þeir væru eða fyrir hví þeir væru þar og hefðu hunda svo stóra.

Þeir mæltu: „Þú munt vera allheimskur maður. Hefir þú eigi heyrt að hér gengur björn um eyna, hinn mesti spellvirki, drepur hér bæði menn og fénað og er lagt fé til höfuðs honum. Vökum vér hér hverja nótt á Aski yfir fé voru er byrgt er í grindum eða hví ferðu með vopnum um nætur?“

Hann segir: „Hræðist eg og björninn og fáir þykir mér sem nú fari vopnlausir. Hefir björninn lengi elt mig í nótt eða sjáið hann nú, þar er hann nú í skógarnefinu. Hvort eru allir menn í svefni á bænum?“

Sveinninn sagði að þeir Berg-Önundur og Fróði mundu enn drekka „þeir sitja nætur allar.“

„Segið þeim þá,“ segir hann Egill, „hvar björninn er en eg verð að skynda heim.“

Hann gekk þá brott en sveinninn hljóp heim til bæjarins og til stofunnar er þeir drukku í. Var þá svo komið að allir menn voru sofa farnir nema þeir þrír, Önundur og Fróði og Haddur. Sveinninn segir hvar björninn var. Þeir tóku vopn sín er þar héngu hjá þeim og hljópu þegar út og upp til skógar. Þar gengu fram skógarnef af mörkinni og runnar í sumum stöðum. Sveinninn segir þeim hvar björninn hafði verið í runninum. Þá sáu þeir að limarnar hrærðust, þóttust þá skilja að björninn mundi þar vera. Þá mælti Berg-Önundur að þeir Haddur og Fróði skyldu fram renna milli og meginmerkurinnar og gæta að björninn næði eigi skóginum.

Berg-Önundur rann fram að runninum. Hann hafði hjálm og skjöld, gyrður sverði en kesju í hendi. Egill var þar fyrir í runninum en engi björn og er hann sá hvar Berg-Önundur var þá brá hann sverðinu en þar var hönk á meðalkaflanum og dró hann hana á hönd sér og lét þar hanga. Hann tók í hönd sér kesjuna og rann þá fram í mót Berg-Önundi. Og er Berg-Önundur sá það þá gæddi hann rásina og skaut skildinum fyrir sig og áður þeir mættust þá skaut hvor kesju að öðrum. Egill laust skildinum við kesjunni og bar hallan svo að reist úr skildinum og flaug í völlinn en Egils spjót kom á miðjan skjöldinn og gekk í gegnum langt upp á fjöðrina og varð fast spjótið í skildinum. Varð Önundi þungbær skjöldurinn. Egill greip þá skjótt meðalkafla sverðsins. Önundur tók þá og að bregða sínu sverði og er eigi var brugðið til hálfs þá lagði Egill í gegnum hann með sínu sverði. Önundur rataði við lagið en Egill kippti að sér sverðinu hart og hjó til Önundar og af nær höfuðið. Síðan tók Egill kesjuna úr skildinum.

Þeir Haddur og Fróði sáu fall Berg-Önundar og runnu þangað til. Egill snerist í móti þeim. Hann skaut kesjunni að Fróða og í gegnum skjöld hans og í brjóstið svo að yddi um bakið. Féll hann þegar á bak aftur dauður. Egill tók þá sverðið og snerist í mót Haddi og skiptust þeir fám höggum við áður Haddur féll.

Þá komu sveinarnir að og mælti Egill við þá: „Gætið hér til Önundar húsbónda yðvars og þeirra félaga að eigi slíti dýr eða fuglar hræ þeirra.“

Egill gekk þá leið sína og eigi langt áður félagar hans komu í mót honum ellefu en sex gættu skips. Þeir spurðu hvað hann hefði sýslað. Hann kvað þá:

Sátum lyngs til lengi
ljósheims við bör þeima,
meir varði eg fé forðum,
fjarðölna, hlut skarða,
áðr Berg-Önund benjum
bensæfðan lét eg venjast.
Bors niðjar felt eg beðju,
blóði Hadds og Fróða.

Þá mælti Egill: „Vér skulum nú snúa aftur til bæjarins og fara hermannlega, drepa menn þá alla er vér náum en taka fé allt það er vér megum með komast.“

Þeir fara til bæjarins og hlaupa þar inn í hús og drepa þar menn fimmtán eða sextán. Sumir komust undan af hlaupi. Þeir rændu þar öllu fé en spilltu því er þeir máttu eigi með fara. Þeir ráku búfé til strandar og hjuggu, báru á bátinn sem hann tók við, fóru síðan leið sína og reru út um eyjasund.

Egill var nú allreiður svo að þá mátti ekki við hann mæla. Sat hann við stýri á bátinum.

Og er þeir sóttu út á fjörðinn til Herðlu þá reru utan í móti þeim Rögnvaldur konungsson og þeir þrettán saman á karfanum þeim hinum steinda. Þeir höfðu þá spurt að skip Egils lá í Herðluveri. Ætluðu þeir að gera Önundi njósn um ferðir Egils. Og er Egill sá skipið þá kenndi hann þegar. Hann stýrði sem beinst á þá og er skipin renndust að þá kom barð skútunnar á kinnung karfans. Hallaði honum svo að sjór féll inn á annað borð og fyllti skipið. Egill hljóp þá upp á og greip kesjuna, hét á menn sína að þeir skyldu engan láta með lífi á brott komast þann er á karfanum var. Það var þá hægt því að þar var þá engi vörn. Voru allir þeir á kafi drepnir en engi komst undan. Létust þeir þar þrettán,[3] Rögnvaldur og förunautar hans. Þeir Egill reru þá inn til eyjarinnar Herðlu. Þá kvað Egill vísu:

Börðumst vér, né virðak,
vígleiftr sonar, heiftir,
Blóðexar rauð eg blóði
böðmildr og Gunnhildar.[4]
Þar féllu nú þollar
þrettán lagar mána,
stendr af styrjar skyndi
starf, á einum karfa.

Og er þeir Egill komu til Herðlu þá runnu þeir þegar upp til bæjar með alvæpni. En er það sá Þórir og hans heimamenn þá runnu þeir þegar af bænum og forðuðu sér allir þeir er ganga máttu, karlar og konur. Þeir Egill rændu þar öllu fé því er þeir máttu höndum á koma, fóru síðan út til skips. Var þá og eigi langt að bíða að byr rann á af landi. Búast þeir til að sigla. Og er þeir voru seglbúnir gekk Egill upp í eyna.

Hann tók í hönd sér heslisstöng og gekk á bergsnös nokkura þá er vissi til lands inn. Þá tók hann hrosshöfuð[5] og setti upp á stöngina.[6] Síðan veitti hann formála[7] og mælti svo: „Hér set eg upp níðstöng og sný eg þessu níði[8] á hönd Eiríki konungi[9] og Gunnhildi drottningu“ — hann sneri hrosshöfðinu inn á land — „sný eg þessu níði á landvættir þær er land þetta byggja svo að allar fari þær villar vega,[10] engi hendi né hitti sitt inni fyrr en þær reka Eirík konung og Gunnhildi úr landi.“[11]

Síðan skýtur hann stönginni niður í bjargrifu og lét þar standa. Hann sneri og höfðinu inn á land en hann reist rúnar á stönginni[12] og segja þær formála þenna allan.

Eftir það gekk Egill á skip. Tóku þeir til segls og sigldu á haf út. Tók þá byrinn að vaxa og gerði veður hvasst og hagstætt. Gekk þá skipið mikið. Þá kvað Egill:

Þél höggr stórt[13] fyrir stáli
stafnkvígs á veg jafnan
út með éla meitli
andær jötunn vandar
en svalbúinn selju
sverfr eirar vanr þeiri
Gestils álft, áðr gisti,
gandr of stál fyrir brandi.

Síðan sigldu þeir í haf og greiddist vel ferð þeirra og komu af hafi í Borgarfjörð. Hélt hann skipi sínu þar til hafnar og báru föt sín á land. Fór þá Egill heim til Borgar en skiparar hans vistuðust. Skalla-Grímur gerðist þá gamall og hrumur af elli. Tók Egill þá til fjárforráða og búsvarðveislu.

Tilvísanir

  1. Haraldur hinn hárfagri: "Egilssaga 163-64 virðist vera útdráttur úr því sem segir í Heimskringlu 146-9. Þeir sem um það efast skyldu gaumgæfa hversu hin stutta frásögn Eglu af Haraldi og sonum hans er fleyguð inn í lengri frásagnir af viðureign Egils við Berg-Önund" Jónas Kristjánsson. Egilssaga og konungasögur (s. 467).
  2. hött síðan: "On two occasions Egil, wishing to pass unrecognized, travels with hǫtt síðan drawn over his helmet. A natural enough disguise, admittedly, but is it merely coincidence that the hood is also Oðin’s usual dress when he appears among men? Just as remarkable is the likeness in temperament between Egil and his god." Wright, Dorena Allen. The Skald as Saga-Hero (s. 15).
  3. Létust þeir þar þrettán: "Nú fær það vissulega ekki staðizt að Egill hafi drepið son Eríks og Gunnhildar […] Auk þess verður að telja gersamlega óhugsandi að Eríkur – og þaðan af síður Gunnhildur – hefði látið sonarbana sinn ganga sér lifandi úr greipum aðeins tveimur árum síðar, hver beygur sem þeim stóð af honum. Engin önnur kvæði né lausavísur Egils sem varðveitzt hafa víkja heldur að þessu atviki." Pétur Benediktsson. Hvers vegna orti Egill Höfuðlausn? (s. 9-10).
  4. böðmildr og Gunnhildar: „Besondere Beachtung verdienen die Strophen 28 und 29 (der neueren Ausgaben), die gegen König Erich und seine Frau Gunnhild gerichtet sind und – wie der Norweger Magnus Olsen vermutet – auf die Neidstange geritzt worden sind.“ Schier, Kurt. Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (s. 2989).
  5. tók hann hrosshöfuð: "If the head was a source of wisdom, it was also a source of destructive power. This is illustrated by the Norse ‘stake of scorn’. This was a pole surmounted by a mutilated horse head. Runes were carved on the stake and the whole device set up and turned towards the victim’s home. In Egil’s Saga we are given some of the words to be uttered. ... The stake of scorn or something like it was still known in Scandinavia as late as the mid-sixteenth century. This is clearly shown by a picture in ‘De Gentibus Septentrionalibus’ by Olaus Magnus, published in 1555." Smith, A.W. The Luck in the Head: A Problem in English Folklore (s. 21-22).
  6. tók hann hrosshöfuð og setti upp á stöngina: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] "Þar reisti hann upp stöng og setti höfuð kóngssonar á hana ofan...“ Indeed, he [the author of “New Egil’s Saga”] even adds to the harrowing account of the ‘scorn-pole’ (119: níðstöng, 171) the detail that it was the head of Rognvald, the king’s son, that Egil mounted on the pole,” Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (p. 188).
  7. veitti hann formála: "It is therefore evident that the formáli is Egil’s text carved on the stick, namely the inscription, and that the words are then repeated by the present people, while allowing to suppose this is a sheer solemn declaration." Meli, Marcello. Rune e magia nella saga di Egill (s. 331).
  8. sný eg þessu níði: "In Egils saga, the magical aspect of the practice of níð is emphasized, placing it in the context of other mystical powers derived from the pagan religion, such as the skilled use of runes, which the poet has at his command.” Finlay, Alison. Egils saga and other poets’ sagas (s. 38).
  9. á hönd Eiríki konungi: "Egill’s effort to manipulate circumstances to his advantage include a coercive summons of supernatural powers, a demand that the spirits of the land banish the royal pair. It is of interest that the erection of the pole is NOT accompanied by verse, despite earlier defamatory stanzas on Eirikr and Gunnhildr." Sayers, William. Poetry and social agency in Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar (s. 44).
  10. svo að allar fari þær villar vega: "In Landnámabók S. 299 wird unter Ulfliots Gesetzen, die 928 gegeben wurden, dieses angeführt: niemand solle ein Meer-schiff haben mit einem Haupte darauf, und habe er dergleichen, so solle man das Haupt nehmen, ehe es ins Gesicht des Landes komme, und nicht heranfahren mit gähnenden Haüptern oder offenen Rachen, um die Landvätter nicht zu erschrecken." Glückselig, Anton Thormod. Skaldenlieder aus der Egils-Saga (s. 176).
  11. úr landi: " Egill drove Eric Blood-Axe and Gunnhilda out of the land by the means of runes that he carved in a wooden pole and, as Magnus Olsen has shown, in the construction of his niðvísa, the magic line of the younger rune series, which was also meaningful to Varinn [i.e. the dedicant of the Rök inscription] among the older ones, plays a role." Franz, L. Egils ‘Sonatorrek’ und die Inschrift von Rök (s. 5)
  12. reist rúnar á stönginni: “The poet’s mastery of runic magic can also be seen as having its parallel in the miracle-working powers of saints, and it is in this sphere, as well as in his níð-verses directed against the tyrannous Eiríkr bloodaxe, that Egill uses his poetic gifts for positive good.” Clunies Ross, Margaret. A Tale of Two Poets (s. 140).
  13. þél höggr stórt: "Ef 6. erindi Þórsdrápu og siglingavísa Egils eru bornar saman, má segja að líkingin í erindi Egils sé eins og laufgað tré, sem í vísu Egils sé búið að vinna í heflað timbur. Mér virðist með öðrum orðum, að hugmyndin í siglingavísu Egils gæti verið sótt í 6. erindi Þórsdrápu." Ólafur Halldórsson. Þél hreggi höggvin (s. 192).

Links

Personal tools