Egla, 88

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 88

Death of Egil Skallagrim's son

Egil Skallagrim's son now grew old,[1] and in his old age became heavy in movement, and dull both in hearing and sight;[2] he became also stiff in the legs.[3] Egil was at Moss-fell with Grim and Thordis.[4] It happened one day that as Egil went out along the house-wall he stumbled and fell. Some women saw this, and laughed, saying: 'You are now quite gone, Egil, if you fall when alone.' Then said the master Grim, 'Women jeered at us less when we were younger.' Egil then sang:

'Old haltered horse I waver,
Bald-head I weakly fall:
Hollow my failing[5] leg-bones,[6][7]
The fount of hearing dry.'

Egil became quite blind.[8] And it was so that one day, when the weather was cold, Egil went to the fire to warm himself. Whereupon the cook said that it was a great wonder, so mighty a man as Egil had been, that he should lie in their way[9] so that they could not do their work. 'Be you civil,' said Egil, 'though I bask by the fire, and let us bear and forbear about place.' 'Stand you up,' said she, 'and go to your seat, and let us do our work.' Egil stood up, and went to his place and sang:

'Blind near the blaze I wander,
Beg of the fire-maid pardon,
Crave for a seat. Such sorrow
From sightless eyes I bear.
Yet England's mighty monarch
Me whilom greatly honoured:[10]
And princes once with pleasure
The poet's accents heard.'[11]

Again, once when Egil went to the fire to warm himself, a man asked him whether his feet were cold, and warned him not to put them too near the fire. 'That shall be so,' said Egil; 'but 'tis not easy steering my feet now that I cannot see; a very dismal thing is blindness.' Then Egil sang:

'Lonely I lie,
And think it long,
Carle worn with eld
From kings' courts exiled.[12]
Feet twain have I,[13]
Frosty and cold,[14]
Bedfellows needing
Blaze of fire.'

In the later days of Hacon the Great Egil Skallagrim's son was in his ninth decade of years, and save for his blindness was a hale and hearty man.[15] One summer, when men made ready to go to the Thing, Egil asked Grim that he might ride with him to the Thing. Grim was slow to grant this. And when Grim and Thordis talked together, Grim told her what Egil had asked. 'I would like you,' said he, 'to find out what lies under this request.' Thordis then went to talk with Egil her uncle: it was Egil's chief pleasure to talk to her. And when she met him she asked: 'Is it true, uncle, that you wish to ride to the Thing? I want you to tell me what plan you have in this?' 'I will tell you,' said he, 'what I have thought of. I mean to take with me to the Thing two chests that king Athelstan gave me, each of which is full of English silver. I mean to have these chests carried to the Hill of Laws just when it is most crowded. Then I mean to sow broadcast the silver,[16] and I shall be surprized if all share it fairly between them. Kicks, I fancy, there will be and blows; nay, it may end in a general fight[17] of all the assembled Thing.' Thordis said: 'A famous plan, methinks, is this, and it will be remembered so long as Iceland is inhabited.'

After this Thordis went to speak with Grim and told him Egil's plan. 'That shall never be,' said he, 'that he carry this out, such monstrous folly.' And when Egil came to speak with Grim of their going to the Thing, Grim talked him out of it all; and Egil sat at home during the Thing. But he did not like it, and he wore a frowning look.

At Moss-fell were the summer-sheds of the milch kine, and during the Thing-time Thordis was at the sheds. It chanced one evening, when the household at Moss-fell were preparing to go to bed, that Egil called to him two thralls[18] of Grim's. He bade them bring him a horse. 'I will go to the warm bath, and you shall go with me,' said he. And when Egil was ready, he went out, and he had with him his chests of silver.[19] He mounted the horse. They then went down through the home paddock and under the slope there, as men saw afterwards. But in the morning, when men rose, they saw Egil wandering about in the holt east of the farm,[20] and leading the horse after him. They went to him, and brought him home. But neither thralls nor chests[21] ever came back again, and many are the guesses as to where Egil hid his money.[22]. East of the farm at Moss-fell is a gill coming down from the fell: and it is noteworthy that in rapid thaws there was a great rush of water there, but after the water has fallen there have been found in the gill English pennies.[23] Some guess[24] that Egil must have hidden his money there. Below the farm enclosure at Moss-fell are bogs wide and very deep. Many feel sure[25] that 'tis there Egil hid his money. And south of the river are hot springs, and hard by there large earthholes, and some men guess that Egil must have hidden his money there, because out that way cairn-fires were often seen to hover. Egil said that he had slain Grim's thralls, also that he had hidden the chests, but where he had hidden them he told no man.

In the autumn following Egil fell sick of the sickness whereof he died. When he was dead, then Grim had Egil dressed in goodly raiment,[26] and carried down to Tjalda-ness;[27] there a sepulchral mound was made, and in it was Egil laid with his weapons and his raiment.

References

  1. now grew old: "Finally, I said that Færeyinga saga was distinguished by its symbolic characters who illustrates opposing attitudes, and by its ironic contrast between individual fate and historical trend. This historical vision is also present - in more sophisticated form - in Egils saga: the dark and light aspects of the family represent contrasting beliefs and behavior. Those who support kings fare badly, while uncooperative and independent men live longest." Berman, Melissa. The Political Sagas (p. 126).
  2. dull both in hearing and sight: "Egil's deafness is consistent with new bone growth compressing the auditory nerve as it runs through a channel in the skull, from the brain to the ear. This symptom has been reported in endemic fluorosis" Weinstein, P. Palaeopathology by proxy: the case of Egil’s bones (p. 1078).
  3. also stiff in the legs: "Verið getur að Egill hafi þjáðst af aflagandi sjúkdómi er kallast Pagetssjúkdómur (Paget's disease). Þessi sjúkdómur, sem e.t.v. er arfgengur eða af völdum veiru, getur valdið blindu á fullorðinsárumn sem og ágengu heyrnar- og jafnvægistapi. Allir þessir annmarkar þjáðu Egil." Byock, Jesse L.. Hauskúpan og beinin í Egils sögu (p. 76).
  4. Egil was at Moss-fell with Grim and Thordis: "As late as 1730 in Iceland, no more than 12 percent of households were three-generational; hence the multigenerational household of the irascible octogenarian Egil Skallagrímsson must surely have been highly unusual in the settlement period." Overing, Gillian. A body in question (p. 216).
  5. Hollow my failing: "Egill states the equation in pithy half-stanza lamenting the effects of age [...]. The line in question translates something like: „soft is the bore of the foot/leg of taste/pleasure“, the bore referring to tongue if one takes bergis fótar to mean „head“, but to penis if one takes the kenning to mean „leg of limb of pleasure. [...] One has in this five-word verse the full cord: when not only one’s sword and penis go limp but also one’s tongue, life is pretty much over." Clover, Carol J.. Regardless of sex (p. 16).
  6. failing leg-bones: “Egill Skalla-Grímsson is literally impotent, but mentally perhaps less so than many others of his age, since at least he is able to compose a skaldic poem about the limpness of his penis.” Ármann Jakobsson. The Specter of Old Age (p. 316).
  7. leg-bones: ““Blautr erum bergis fótar / borr” says Egill. “Bergis fótar borr” is a kenning, a metaphorical poetic circumlocution, and like many skaldic kennings it has been interpreted in various ways. It might be translated literally as “borer/drill of the hill of the leg/foot.” The “hill of the leg” may then be interpreted to mean “head,” in which case its borer or drill is the tongue and Egill is confessing an inability to compose verse as fluently as in the past. Alternatively a more obscene meaning of “hill of the leg” entails that its borer or drill is Egill’s penis. Given the skaldic love of double entendre it is likely both meanings are intended.” Phelpstead, Carl. Size Matters (p. 425)
  8. became quite blind: „Að sögn Freuds er algengt að geldingarhræðsla komi fram í ótta við að missa augun eða blindast, en til staðfestingar þeirri hugmynd hefði hann væntanlega getað bent á að í lok Egils sögu fer saman lýsing á því að Egill hafi orðið „með öllu sjónlaus“ í elli sinni“ og dróttkvæð vísa þar sem fram kemur að getnaðarlimur („bergis fótar borr“) hans sé orðinn gagnslítill“. Jón Karl Helgason. Rjóðum spjöll í dreyra (p. 65).
  9. that he should lie in their way: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] "Það var einn tíma um vorið að allir karlmenn voru heiman farnir frá Mosfelli til erinda sinna, að hestur einn lá í bænum að Mosfelli um þverar dyr dauður, so ei var hægt að ganga hjá, en konum varð mjög að orðum um það þær kæmi honum ei í burt. Sem Egill þetta heyrði gekk hann á fætur, og var hann þá allsendis blindur, og leiddu konur þangað sem hesturinn lá dauður, og tók hann um afturfætur hestsins og rykkti honum í einu út á hlað svo út gegnu garnir.“ Whereas in the medieval A-version Egil is told off by the cook at Mosfell for being in her way in the kitchen, here it is a dead horse that gets in the women’s way and Egil himself who sees to their problem. ‘New Egil’s Saga’ contains none of the anecdotes about Egil’s old age that are found (varyingly) in other versions, and which the writer must have known from the rímur." Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (p. 192).
  10. whilom greatly honoured: "The splendid bygone time in which Egil is absorbed in thought constitutes his true identity, while being concealed by his present misery. The two parts of the stanza juxtapose – cruelly but triumphantly – the tangible social personality (the weak old man who is ridiculed by the women) and the interior one." Koch, Ludovica. Gli scaldi (p. xvii).
  11. heard: "The reference no doubt is to King Æthelstán (sic) of England, the only king Egil ever got along with... And Egil composed a drápa in the king's honor. So it is most unlikely that Egil ever after confused the two princes [Eric and Æthelstan]. Admittedly though, this leaves us with the seemingly contradictory attribute gramr 'grim, enraged', certainly best applied to Eric. However, a meaning 'stern' is possible, too... Little is known of Æthelstan's character. But that the basileus of England was redoubtable to his enemies, of that there cannot be any question." Hollander, Lee M. Egill Skallagrímsson (p. 105)
  12. From kings' courts exiled.: " Samkvæmt þessu liggur Egill á brjóstinu, þ.e. meltunni, er hann kveðst liggja ,á konungs vörnum‘ en brjóstið er líka uppspretta skáldskapar hans því að fornu trúðu menn því að þar byggi vitið. Með þremur orðum eru þá í hinstu vísu Egils samtvinnaðir þeir þræðir sem frekast hafa einkennt alla sögu hans: baráttan við konungsvaldið og skáldskapurinn. " Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir, Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Um Egils sögu (p. xxii).
  13. From kings' courts exiled. Feet twain have I: " þá sýnist eðlilegra að gera ráð fyrir að Egill vísi til líkamshluta í fyrri part vísunnar eins og hann gerir í þeim síðari. Því má ætla að á konungs vörnum þýði annaðhvort á maganum eða á brjóstinu." Sverrir Tómasson. Á konungs vörnum (p. 104).
  14. Feet twain have I / Frosty and cold,: "Lýsingin kemur heim og saman við það að blóðstreymi er oft lítið til útlima sjúklinga með osteitis deformans, svo þeir verða kaldir." Örnólfur Thorlacius. Hjálmaklettur Egils (p.137).
  15. save for his blindness was a hale and hearty man: "Jón Björnsson suggests that the sagas tend to record the unusual, and hence the unusual elder … the advanced age of Egil Skallagrímsson … is recorded along with his other achievements, and Jesse Byock has recently suggested that the decrepitude and sexual incapacity recorded by the sagawriter may have been due to Paget’s disease as opposed to senility." Overing, Gillian. A body in question (p. 214).
  16. sow broadcast the silver: "Aldrei er [Egill] annar eins Óðinsdýrkandi og þegar hannn [svo] ætlar síðast til Alþingis með silfrið frá Aðalsteini, sem hann hafði aldrei við sig skilið og haldið fastast fyrir föður sínum. ... Hann ætlar að gera fé sitt að rógmálmi skatna, etja mönnum saman að dæmi Óðins fá honum enn fylgd, þó að sjálfur mætti hann ekki vega." Sigurður Nordal. Átrúnaður Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 164).
  17. end in a general fight: "Suetonius segir frá því í keisarasögum sínum, meðal annarra firna af hátterni Caligula, að hann hafi valdið misklíð milli alþýðumana og riddara með því að gefa decimae (ókeypis veitingar) of snemma, svo að skríll legði undir sig riddarasætin." Bjarni Einarsson. Fólgið fé á Mosfelli (p. 102).
  18. two thralls: "Megi gera því skóna að dráp þrælanna tveggja undir ævilok Egils [...] sé í raun blótfórn, væri þar kominn merkur endir á lífshlaup Óðinsdýrkandans." Heimir Pálsson. Óðinn, Þór og Egill (p. 115).
  19. chests of silver: „Das hohe Alter von Skallagrímr und sein Tod verweisen ebenfalls auf den mythischen Raum. Unmittelbar vor seinem Tod vollbringt er noch eine große Tat: Er geht während der Nacht weg, versteckt seine große Kiste und einen Bronzekessel (wahrscheinlich voll Gold) in einem Moor und legt einen großen flachen Stein darauf, was gewissermaßen eine Parallele zu der Schmiedestein-Affäre ist. Wenn Egill später sein Silber versteckt, wird diese Episode gespiegelt – und beide Aktionen erinnern an die Heldensage und den Nibelungenhort.“ Baldur Hafstað. Die Egils saga im Lichte von Mythen, Heldensage und Wikingersage (p. 104).
  20. east of the farm: „Svo var röm í [Agli] forneskjan, og má af því ráða að hann hafi trúað því að hann mundi nota silfursins dauður, ef hann græfi það í jörð. Tilgátan um, að hann hafi fólgið það í gilinu „fyrir austan garð at Mosfelli“ er því ekki ósennileg“ Árni Óla. Hvar fól Egill silfur Aðalsteins konungs (p. 183).
  21. nor chests: "[Egil] buries the hoard in a secret location, effectively disinheriting his own children. [...] In place of the funerary poem he had failed to compose for her, Egil expresses his grief for Asgerd [...] in the idiom of belligerent widowerhood. With no second wife to bear him a child of his old age, who might ruinously complicate inheritance matters in the manner of Hildirid's sons or Gunnhild Bjarnardottir, Egil manoeuvres to become his own heir." Falk, Oren. *Konutorrek: A Husband’s Lament (p. 142).
  22. hid his money: ““Hidden silver of gold is a well-known motif, Atlakviða being another example. But this version – hiding your silver with the help of slaves who are then killed – appears only in these two sources in Old Icelandic literature [Egils saga and the Landnámabók account of Ketilbjörn gamli]. This reinforces the view that there are direct connections between the two works.” Baldur Hafstað. Egils saga, Njáls saga, and the Shadow of Landnáma (p. 28).
  23. found in the gill English pennies: „Egill var auðugur að fé. Eins og Ketilbjörn bjó hann á Mosfelli […] Í báðum textum er talað um skarð eða gil í fellinu ofan við bæinn […] En þetta mótíf - að fela silfur sitt með aðstöð þræla sem síðan eru drepnir - birtist aðeins á þessum tveimur stöðum í fornum bókmenntum okkar. Það styrkir þá skoðun að áhrifin séu bein þarna á milli […] Þannig má segja að frásögn Landnámu leggi fram mikilvægan efnivið að síðari hluta Egils sögu". Baldur Hafstað. HSk, Landnáma og Egils saga (p. 33-34).
  24. some guess: "Tilvísanir til þess að sumir segi þetta og aðrir hitt er gömul brella, og ekki er meira mark takandi á því sem hann segir um silfurpeningafund en um haugaeld." Bjarni Einarsson. Fólgið fé á Mosfelli (p. 102).
  25. feel sure: "Þessi frásögn sýnir, að fólki í Mosfellssveit hefur snemma orðið skrafdrjúgt um silfur Egils og jafnvel gert skipulegar tilraunir til að finna það." Kristján Eldjárn. Kistur Aðalsteins konungs (p. 100).
  26. dressed in goodly raiment: “After his death, Egill is buried by Grímr Svertingsson, … in a respectful manner: ‘in good clothes’ (‘í klæði góð’) together with his weapons and garments … Egill’s own strong mind is thus pacified by respectful burial practices that apply him with good clothes and weapons in the afterlife, as well as Christianity and Christian men.” Kanerva, Kirsi. Rituals for the Restless Dead (p. 221).
  27. carried down to Tjalda-ness: "Engin vissa er fyrir því, hvar Tjaldanes hafi verið, þar sem Egill var heygðr. Örnefnið er nú ekki til lengur. En líklega hefir það verið í Mosfellslandi, og þá er helst ætlandi, að oddi sá, sem myndast milli ármótanna Köldukvíslar og Reykjaár, sem nú heitir Víðiroddi, hafi verið kallarður Tjaldanes, eins og fyr er á vikið." Magnús Grímsson. Athugasemdir við Egils sögu Skallagrímssonar (p. 271).

Kafli 88

Andlát Egils Skalla-Grímssonar

Egill Skalla-Grímsson varð maður gamall[1] en í elli hans gerðist hann þungfær og glapnaði honum bæði heyrn og sýn.[2] Hann gerðist og fótstirður.[3] Egill var þá að Mosfelli með Grími og Þórdísi.[4]

Það var einn dag er Egill gekk úti með vegg og drap fæti og féll. Konur nokkurar sáu það og hlógu að og mæltu: „Farinn ertu nú Egill með öllu er þú fellur einn saman.“

Þá segir Grímur bóndi: „Miður hæddu konur að okkur þá er við vorum yngri.“

Þá kvað Egill:

Vald hefi eg vofur helsis,
váfallr er eg skalla.
Blautr erumst[5] bergi fótar[6]
borr[7] en lust er þorrin.

Egill varð með öllu sjónlaus.[8] Það var einhvern dag er veður var kalt um veturinn að Egill fór til elds að verma sig. Matseljan ræddi um að það var undur mikið, slíkur maður sem Egill hafði verið, að hann skyldi liggja fyrir fótum þeim[9] svo að þær mættu eigi vinna verk sín.

„Ver þú vel við,“ segir Egill, „þótt eg bakist við eldinn og mýkjumst vér við um rúmin.“

„Stattu upp,“ segir hún, „og gakk til rúms þíns og lát oss vinna verk vor.“

Egill stóð upp og gekk til rúms síns og kvað:

Hvarfa eg blindr of branda,
bið eg eirar Syn geira,
þann ber eg harm á hvarma
hvitvöllum mér, sitja.
Er jarðgöfugr, orðum,
orð mín konungr forðum[10]
hafði, gramr, að gamni,
Geirhamdis mig framdi.[11]

Það var enn eitt sinn er Egill gekk til elds að verma sig, þá spurði maður hann hvort honum væri kalt á fótum og bað hann eigi rétta of nær eldinum.

„Svo skal vera,“ segir Egill, „en eigi verður mér nú hógstýrt fótunum er eg sé eigi og er of dauflegt sjónleysið.“

Þá kvað Egill:

Langt þykir mér,
ligg eg einn saman,
karl afgamall,
á konungs vörnum.[12]
Eigum ekkjur[13]
alkaldar tvær[14]
en þær konur
þurfa blossa.

Það var á dögum Hákonar hins ríka öndverðum, þá var Egill Skalla-Grímsson á níunda tigi og var hann þá hress maður fyrir annars sakir en sjónleysis.[15]

Það var um sumarið er menn bjuggust til þings þá beiddi Egill Grím að ríða til þings með honum. Grímur tók því seinlega.

Og er þau Grímur og Þórdís töluðust við þá sagði Grímur henni hvers Egill hafði beitt „vil eg að þú forvitnist hvað undir mun búa bæn þessi.“

Þórdís gekk til máls við Egil frænda sinn. Var þá mest gaman Egils að ræða við hana. Og er hún hitti hann þá spurði hún: „Er það satt frændi er þú vilt til þings ríða? Vildi eg að þú segðir mér hvað væri í ráðagerð þinni.“

„Eg skal segja þér,“ kvað hann, „hvað eg hefi hugsað. Eg ætla að hafa til þings með mér kistur þær tvær er Aðalsteinn konungur gaf mér er hvortveggi er full af ensku silfri. Ætla eg að láta bera kisturnar til Lögbergs þá er þar er fjölmennast. Síðan ætla eg að sá silfrinu[16] og þykir mér undarlegt ef allir skipta vel sín í milli. Ætla eg að þar mundi vera þá hrundningar eða pústrar eða bærist að um síðir að allur þingheimurinn berðist.“[17]

Þórdís segir: „Þetta þykir mér þjóðráð og mun uppi meðan landið er byggt.“

Síðan gekk Þórdís til tals við Grím og sagði honum ráðagerð Egils.

„Það skal aldrei verða að hann komi þessu fram, svo miklum firnum.“

Og er Egill kom á ræður við Grím um þingferðina þá taldi Grímur það allt af og sat Egill heima um þingið. Eigi líkaði honum það vel. Var hann heldur ófrýnn.

Að Mosfelli var höfð selför og var Þórdís í seli um þingið.

Það var eitt kveld þá er menn bjuggust til rekkna að Mosfelli að Egill kallaði til sín þræla tvo[18] er Grímur átti. Hann bað þá taka sér hest „vil eg fara til laugar.“

Og er Egill var búinn gekk hann út og hafði með sér silfurkistur sínar.[19] Hann steig á hest, fór síðan ofan eftir túninu fyrir brekku þá er þar verður er menn sáu síðast.

En um morguninn er menn risu upp þá sáu þeir að Egill hvarflaði á holtinu fyrir austan garð[20] og leiddi eftir sér hestinn. Fara þeir þá til hans og fluttu hann heim.

En hvorki komu aftur síðan þrælarnir né kisturnar[21] og eru þar margar gátur á hvar Egill hafi fólgið fé sitt.[22] Fyrir austan garð að Mosfelli gengur gil ofan úr fjalli. En það hefir orðið þar til merkja að í bráðaþeyjum er þar vatnfall mikið en eftir það er vötnin hafa fram fallið hafa fundist í gilinu enskir peningar.[23] Geta sumir menn þess[24] að Egill muni þar féið hafa fólgið. Fyrir neðan tún að Mosfelli eru fen stór og furðulega djúp. Hafa það margir fyrir satt[25] að Egill muni þar hafa kastað í fé sínu. Fyrir sunnan ána eru laugar og þar skammt frá jarðholur stórar og geta þess sumir að Egill mundi þar hafa fólgið fé sitt því að þangað er oftlega sénn haugaeldur. Egill sagði að hann hefði drepið þræla Gríms og svo það að hann hafði fé sitt fólgið, en það sagði hann engum manni hvar hann hefði fólgið.

Egill tók sótt eftir um haustið þá er hann leiddi til bana. En er hann var andaður þá lét Grímur færa Egil í klæði góð.[26] Síðan lét hann flytja hann ofan í Tjaldanes[27] og gera þar haug og var Egill þar í lagður og vopn hans og klæði.

Tilvísanir

  1. varð maður gamall: "Finally, I said that Færeyinga saga was distinguished by its symbolic characters who illustrates opposing attitudes, and by its ironic contrast between individual fate and historical trend. This historical vision is also present - in more sophisticated form - in Egils saga: the dark and light aspects of the family represent contrasting beliefs and behavior. Those who support kings fare badly, while uncooperative and independent men live longest." Berman, Melissa. The Political Sagas (s. 126).
  2. glapnaði honum bæði heyrn og sýn: "Egil's deafness is consistent with new bone growth compressing the auditory nerve as it runs through a channel in the skull, from the brain to the ear. This symptom has been reported in endemic fluorosis" Weinstein, P. Palaeopathology by proxy: the case of Egil’s bones (s. 1078).
  3. gerðist og fótstirður: "Verið getur að Egill hafi þjáðst af aflagandi sjúkdómi er kallast Pagetssjúkdómur (Paget's disease). Þessi sjúkdómur, sem e.t.v. er arfgengur eða af völdum veiru, getur valdið blindu á fullorðinsárumn sem og ágengu heyrnar- og jafnvægistapi. Allir þessir annmarkar þjáðu Egil." Byock, Jesse L.. Hauskúpan og beinin í Egils sögu (s. 76).
  4. Egill var þá að Mosfelli með Grími og Þórdísi: "As late as 1730 in Iceland, no more than 12 percent of households were three-generational; hence the multigenerational household of the irascible octogenarian Egil Skallagrímsson must surely have been highly unusual in the settlement period." Overing, Gillian. A body in question (s. 216).
  5. Blautr erumst: "Egill states the equation in pithy half-stanza lamenting the effects of age [...]. The line in question translates something like: „soft is the bore of the foot/leg of taste/pleasure“, the bore referring to tongue if one takes bergis fótar to mean „head“, but to penis if one takes the kenning to mean „leg of limb of pleasure. [...] One has in this five-word verse the full cord: when not only one’s sword and penis go limp but also one’s tongue, life is pretty much over." Clover, Carol J.. Regardless of sex (s. 16).
  6. bergi fótar: “Egill Skalla-Grímsson is literally impotent, but mentally perhaps less so than many others of his age, since at least he is able to compose a skaldic poem about the limpness of his penis.” Ármann Jakobsson. The Specter of Old Age (s. 316).
  7. borr: ““Blautr erum bergis fótar / borr” says Egill. “Bergis fótar borr” is a kenning, a metaphorical poetic circumlocution, and like many skaldic kennings it has been interpreted in various ways. It might be translated literally as “borer/drill of the hill of the leg/foot.” The “hill of the leg” may then be interpreted to mean “head,” in which case its borer or drill is the tongue and Egill is confessing an inability to compose verse as fluently as in the past. Alternatively a more obscene meaning of “hill of the leg” entails that its borer or drill is Egill’s penis. Given the skaldic love of double entendre it is likely both meanings are intended.” Phelpstead, Carl. Size Matters (s. 425)
  8. varð með öllu sjónlaus: „Að sögn Freuds er algengt að geldingarhræðsla komi fram í ótta við að missa augun eða blindast, en til staðfestingar þeirri hugmynd hefði hann væntanlega getað bent á að í lok Egils sögu fer saman lýsing á því að Egill hafi orðið „með öllu sjónlaus“ í elli sinni“ og dróttkvæð vísa þar sem fram kemur að getnaðarlimur („bergis fótar borr“) hans sé orðinn gagnslítill“. Jón Karl Helgason. Rjóðum spjöll í dreyra (s. 65).
  9. að hann skyldi liggja fyrir fótum þeim: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] "Það var einn tíma um vorið að allir karlmenn voru heiman farnir frá Mosfelli til erinda sinna, að hestur einn lá í bænum að Mosfelli um þverar dyr dauður, so ei var hægt að ganga hjá, en konum varð mjög að orðum um það þær kæmi honum ei í burt. Sem Egill þetta heyrði gekk hann á fætur, og var hann þá allsendis blindur, og leiddu konur þangað sem hesturinn lá dauður, og tók hann um afturfætur hestsins og rykkti honum í einu út á hlað svo út gegnu garnir.“ Whereas in the medieval A-version Egil is told off by the cook at Mosfell for being in her way in the kitchen, here it is a dead horse that gets in the women’s way and Egil himself who sees to their problem. ‘New Egil’s Saga’ contains none of the anecdotes about Egil’s old age that are found (varyingly) in other versions, and which the writer must have known from the rímur." Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (p. 192).
  10. orð mín konungr forðum: "The splendid bygone time in which Egil is absorbed in thought constitutes his true identity, while being concealed by his present misery. The two parts of the stanza juxtapose – cruelly but triumphantly – the tangible social personality (the weak old man who is ridiculed by the women) and the interior one." Koch, Ludovica. Gli scaldi (s. xvii).
  11. framdi: "The reference no doubt is to King Æthelstán (sic) of England, the only king Egil ever got along with... And Egil composed a drápa in the king's honor. So it is most unlikely that Egil ever after confused the two princes [Eric and Æthelstan]. Admittedly though, this leaves us with the seemingly contradictory attribute gramr 'grim, enraged', certainly best applied to Eric. However, a meaning 'stern' is possible, too... Little is known of Æthelstan's character. But that the basileus of England was redoubtable to his enemies, of that there cannot be any question." Hollander, Lee M. Egill Skallagrímsson (p. 105)
  12. á konungs vörnum.: " Samkvæmt þessu liggur Egill á brjóstinu, þ.e. meltunni, er hann kveðst liggja ,á konungs vörnum‘ en brjóstið er líka uppspretta skáldskapar hans því að fornu trúðu menn því að þar byggi vitið. Með þremur orðum eru þá í hinstu vísu Egils samtvinnaðir þeir þræðir sem frekast hafa einkennt alla sögu hans: baráttan við konungsvaldið og skáldskapurinn. " Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir, Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Um Egils sögu (s. xxii).
  13. á konungs vörnum. Eigum ekkjur: " þá sýnist eðlilegra að gera ráð fyrir að Egill vísi til líkamshluta í fyrri part vísunnar eins og hann gerir í þeim síðari. Því má ætla að á konungs vörnum þýði annaðhvort á maganum eða á brjóstinu." Sverrir Tómasson. Á konungs vörnum (s. 104).
  14. Eigum ekkjur / alkaldar tvær: "Lýsingin kemur heim og saman við það að blóðstreymi er oft lítið til útlima sjúklinga með osteitis deformans, svo þeir verða kaldir." Örnólfur Thorlacius. Hjálmaklettur Egils (s.137).
  15. hress maður fyrir annars sakir en sjónleysis: "Jón Björnsson suggests that the sagas tend to record the unusual, and hence the unusual elder … the advanced age of Egil Skallagrímsson … is recorded along with his other achievements, and Jesse Byock has recently suggested that the decrepitude and sexual incapacity recorded by the sagawriter may have been due to Paget’s disease as opposed to senility." Overing, Gillian. A body in question (s. 214).
  16. ætla eg að sá silfrinu: "Aldrei er [Egill] annar eins Óðinsdýrkandi og þegar hannn [svo] ætlar síðast til Alþingis með silfrið frá Aðalsteini, sem hann hafði aldrei við sig skilið og haldið fastast fyrir föður sínum. ... Hann ætlar að gera fé sitt að rógmálmi skatna, etja mönnum saman að dæmi Óðins fá honum enn fylgd, þó að sjálfur mætti hann ekki vega." Sigurður Nordal. Átrúnaður Egils Skallagrímssonar (s. 164).
  17. þingheimurinn berðist: "Suetonius segir frá því í keisarasögum sínum, meðal annarra firna af hátterni Caligula, að hann hafi valdið misklíð milli alþýðumana og riddara með því að gefa decimae (ókeypis veitingar) of snemma, svo að skríll legði undir sig riddarasætin." Bjarni Einarsson. Fólgið fé á Mosfelli (s. 102).
  18. þræla tvo: "Megi gera því skóna að dráp þrælanna tveggja undir ævilok Egils [...] sé í raun blótfórn, væri þar kominn merkur endir á lífshlaup Óðinsdýrkandans." Heimir Pálsson. Óðinn, Þór og Egill (s. 115).
  19. silfurkistur sínar: „Das hohe Alter von Skallagrímr und sein Tod verweisen ebenfalls auf den mythischen Raum. Unmittelbar vor seinem Tod vollbringt er noch eine große Tat: Er geht während der Nacht weg, versteckt seine große Kiste und einen Bronzekessel (wahrscheinlich voll Gold) in einem Moor und legt einen großen flachen Stein darauf, was gewissermaßen eine Parallele zu der Schmiedestein-Affäre ist. Wenn Egill später sein Silber versteckt, wird diese Episode gespiegelt – und beide Aktionen erinnern an die Heldensage und den Nibelungenhort.“ Baldur Hafstað. Die Egils saga im Lichte von Mythen, Heldensage und Wikingersage (s. 104).
  20. fyrir austan garð: "Svo var röm í [Agli] forneskjan, og má af því ráða að hann hafi trúað því að hann mundi nota silfursins dauður, ef hann græfi það í jörð. Tilgátan um, að hann hafi fólgið það í gilinu "fyrir austan garð at Mosfelli" er því ekki ósennileg" Árni Óla. Hvar fól Egill silfur Aðalsteins konungs (s. 183).
  21. né kisturnar: "[Egil] buries the hoard in a secret location, effectively disinheriting his own children. [...] In place of the funerary poem he had failed to compose for her, Egil expresses his grief for Asgerd [...] in the idiom of belligerent widowerhood. With no second wife to bear him a child of his old age, who might ruinously complicate inheritance matters in the manner of Hildirid's sons or Gunnhild Bjarnardottir, Egil manoeuvres to become his own heir." Falk, Oren. *Konutorrek: A Husband’s Lament (s. 142).
  22. fólgið fé sitt: ““Hidden silver of gold is a well-known motif, Atlakviða being another example. But this version – hiding your silver with the help of slaves who are then killed – appears only in these two sources in Old Icelandic literature [Egils saga and the Landnámabók account of Ketilbjörn gamli]. This reinforces the view that there are direct connections between the two works.” Baldur Hafstað. Egils saga, Njáls saga, and the Shadow of Landnáma (s. 28).
  23. fundist í gilinu enskir peningar: „Egill var auðugur að fé. Eins og Ketilbjörn bjó hann á Mosfelli […] Í báðum textum er talað um skarð eða gil í fellinu ofan við bæinn […] En þetta mótíf - að fela silfur sitt með aðstöð þræla sem síðan eru drepnir - birtist aðeins á þessum tveimur stöðum í fornum bókmenntum okkar. Það styrkir þá skoðun að áhrifin séu bein þarna á milli […] Þannig má segja að frásögn Landnámu leggi fram mikilvægan efnivið að síðari hluta Egils sögu". Baldur Hafstað. HSk, Landnáma og Egils saga (s. 33-34).
  24. geta sumir menn þess: "Tilvísanir til þess að sumir segi þetta og aðrir hitt er gömul brella, og ekki er meira mark takandi á því sem hann segir um silfurpeningafund en um haugaeld." Bjarni Einarsson. Fólgið fé á Mosfelli (s. 102).
  25. margir fyrir satt: "Þessi frásögn sýnir, að fólki í Mosfellssveit hefur snemma orðið skrafdrjúgt um silfur Egils og jafnvel gert skipulegar tilraunir til að finna það." Kristján Eldjárn. Kistur Aðalsteins konungs (s. 100).
  26. færa Egil í klæði góð: “After his death, Egill is buried by Grímr Svertingsson, … in a respectful manner: ‘in good clothes’ (‘í klæði góð’) together with his weapons and garments … Egill’s own strong mind is thus pacified by respectful burial practices that apply him with good clothes and weapons in the afterlife, as well as Christianity and Christian men.” Kanerva, Kirsi. Rituals for the Restless Dead (s. 221).
  27. flytja hann ofan í Tjaldanes: "Engin vissa er fyrir því, hvar Tjaldanes hafi verið, þar sem Egill var heygðr. Örnefnið er nú ekki til lengur. En líklega hefir það verið í Mosfellslandi, og þá er helst ætlandi, að oddi sá, sem myndast milli ármótanna Köldukvíslar og Reykjaár, sem nú heitir Víðiroddi, hafi verið kallarður Tjaldanes, eins og fyr er á vikið." Magnús Grímsson. Athugasemdir við Egils sögu Skallagrímssonar (s. 271).

Links

Personal tools