Egla, 57

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 57

Suit between Egil and Onund

In the spring he made ready a merchant-ship for a voyage to Iceland. Arinbjorn advised him not to settle in Norway while Gunnhilda's power was so great. 'For she is very wroth with you,' said Arinbjorn; 'and this has been made much worse by your encounter with Eyvind near Jutland.'

But when[1] Egil was ready, and a fair wind blew, he sailed out to sea, and his voyage sped well. He came in the autumn to Iceland, and stood into Borgar-firth. He had now been out twelve winters. Skallagrim was an old man by this time. Full glad was he[2] when Egil came home. Egil went to lodge at Borg, and with him Thofid Strong and many of their company; and they were there with Skallagrim for the winter. Egil had immense store of wealth; but it is not told[3] that Egil shared that silver which king Athelstan had given him either with Skallagrim or others. That winter Thorfid married Sæunn, Skallagrim's daughter; and in the following spring Skallagrim gave them a homestead at Long-river-foss, and the land inwards from Leiru-brook between Long-river and Swan-river, even up to the fell. Daughter of Thorfid and Sæunn was Thordis wife to Arngeir in Holm, the son of Bersi Godless. Their son was Bjorn, Hitadale's champion.[4]

Egil abode there with Skallagrim several winters. He took upon him the management of the property and farm no less than Skallagrim. Egil became more and more bald. The country-side began now to be settled far and wide. Hromund, brother of Grim the Halogalander, settled at this time in Cross-river-lithe with his shipmates. Hromund was father of Gunnlaug, the father of Thuridr Dylla, mother of Illugi the Swarthy.

Egil had now been several winters at Borg with his father, when one summer a ship from Norway to Iceland with these tidings from the east, that Bjorn Yeoman was dead. Further, it was told that all the property owned by Bjorn had been taken up by Bergonund, his son-in-law, who had moved to his own home all loose chattels, letting out the lands, and securing to himself all the rents. He had also got possession of all the farms occupied of late by Bjorn. This when Egil heard, he inquired carefully whether Bjorn had acted on his own counsel in this matter, or had the support of others more powerful. It was told him that Onund was become a close friend of king Eric, but was on even more intimate terms with Gunnhilda.

Egil let the matter rest for this autumn; but when winter was past and spring came, then Egil bade them draw out his ship, which had stood in the shed at Long-river-foss. This ship he made ready for sea, and got a crew thereto. Asgerdr his wife was to go with him, but Thordis Thorolf's daughter remained behind. Egil sailed out to sea when he was ready, and of his voyage there is nothing to tell before he came to Norway. He at once, as soon as he could, went to seek Arinbjorn. Arinbjorn received him well, and asked Egil to stay with him; this offer he took. So both he and Asgerdr went thither and several men with them.

Egil very soon spoke with Arinbjorn about those claims on money that he thought he had there in the land.

Arinbjorn said, 'That matter seems to me unpromising. Bergonund is hard, ill to deal with, unjust, covetous; and he has now much support from the king and the queen. Gunnhilda is your bitter enemy, as you know already, and she will not desire Onund to put the case right.'

Egil said, 'The king will let us get law and justice in this matter, and with your help it seems no great thing in my eyes to take the law of Bergonund.'

They resolved on this, that Egil should equip a swift cutter, whereon they embarked some twenty men, and went south to Hordaland and on to Askr. There they go to the house and find Onund. Egil declares his business, and demands of Onund's sharing of the heritage of Bjorn.[5] He says that Bjorn's daughters were by law both alike his heirs, 'Though methinks,' says Egil, 'Asgerdr will be deemed more nobly born than your wife Gunnhilda.'

Then says Onund in high-pitched voice, 'A wondrous bold man are you, Egil, the outlaw of king Eric, who come hither to his land and think here to attack his men and friends. You are to know, Egil, that I have overthrown men as good as you for less cause than methinks this is, when you claim heritage in right of your wife; for this is well known to all, that she is born of a bondwoman.'

Onund was furious in language for a time; but when Egil saw that Onund would do no right in this matter, then he summoned him to court, and referred the matter to the law of the Gula-thing.

Onund said, 'To the Gula-thing I will come, and my will is that you should not come away thence with a whole skin.'

Egil said he would risk coming to the Thing all the same: 'There let come what come may to end our matter.'

Egil then went away with his company, and when he came home told Arinbjorn of his journey and of Onund's answer. Arinbjorn was very angry that Thora his father's sister had been called a bondwoman. Arinbjorn went to king Eric, and declared this matter before him.'

The king took his words rather sullenly, and said that Arinbjorn had long advocated Egil's cause: 'He has had this grace through thee, that I have let him be here in the land; but now shall I think it too much to bear if thou back him in his assaults on my friends.'

Arinbjorn said, 'Thou wilt let us get law in this case.'

The king was rather peevish in this talk, but Arinbjorn could see that the queen was much worse-willed.

Arinbjorn went back and said that things looked rather unpromising. Then winter wore away, and the time came when men should go to the Gula-thing. Arinbjorn took to the Thing a numerous company, among them went Egil.

King Eric was there numerously attended. Bergonund was among his train, as were his brothers; there was a large following. But when the meeting was to be held about men's lawsuits, both the parties went where the court was set, to plead their proofs. Then was Onund full of big words. Now where the court sate was a level plot, with hazel-poles planted in a ring, and outside were twisted ropes all around. This was called, 'the precincts.' Within the ring sate twelve judges of the Firth-folk, twelve of the Sogn-folk, twelve of the Horda-folk. These three twelves were to judge all the suits. Arinbjorn ruled who should be judges from the Firth-folk, Thord of Aurland who should be so from the Sogn-folk. All these were of one party. Arinbjorn had brought thither a long-ship full equipt, also many small craft and store-ships. King Eric had six or seven long-ships all well equipt; a great number of landowners were also there.

Egil began his cause thus: he craved the judges to give him lawful judgement in the suit between him and Onund. He then set forth what proofs he held of his claim on the property that had belonged to Bjorn Brynjolf's son. He said that Asgerdr daughter of Bjorn, own wife of him Egil, was rightful heiress, born noble, of landed gentry, even of titled family further back. And he craved of the judges this, to adjudge to Asgerdr half of Bjorn's inheritance, whether land or chattels.

And when he ceased speaking, then Bergonund took the word and spoke thus: 'Gunnhilda my wife is the daughter of Bjorn and Alof, the wife whom Bjorn lawfully married. Gunnhilda is rightful heiress of Bjorn. I for this reason took possession of all the property left by Bjorn, because I knew that that other daughter of Bjorn had no right to inherit. Her mother was a captive of war, afterwards taken as concubine, without her kinsmen's consent, and carried from land to land. But thou, Egil, thinkest to go on here, as everywhere else, with thy fierceness and wrongful dealing. This will not avail thee now; for king Eric and queen Gunnhilda have promised me that I shall have right in every cause within the bounds of their dominion. I will produce true evidence before the king and the judges that Thora Lace-hand, Asgerdr's mother, was taken captive from the house of Thorir her brother, and a second time from Brynjolf's house at Aurland. Then she went away out of the land with freebooters, and was outlawed from Norway, and in this outlawry Bjorn and she had born to them this girl Asgerdr. A great wonder now is this in Egil, that he thinks to make void all the words of king Eric. First, Egil, thou art here in the land after Eric made thee an outlaw; secondly - which is worse - though, thou hast a bondwoman to thy wife, thou claimest for her right of heritage. I demand this of the judges, that they adjudge the inheritance to Gunnhilda, but adjudge Asgerdr to be the bondwoman of the king, because she was begotten when her father and mother were outlawed by the king.'

Right wroth was Arinbjorn when he heard Thora Lace-hand called a bondwoman; and he stood up, and would no longer hold his peace, but looked around on either side, and took the word:

'Evidence we will bring, sir king, in this matter, and oaths we will add, that this was in the reconciliation of my father and Bjorn Yeoman expressly provided, that Asgerdr daughter of Bjorn and Thora was to have right of inheriting[6] after Bjorn her father; as also this, which thyself, O king, dost know, that thou restoredst Bjorn to his rights in Norway, and so everything was settled which had before stood in the way of their reconciliation.'

To these words the king found no ready answer.[7] Then sang Egil a stave:

'Bondwoman born this knave
My brooch-decked lady calls.
Shameless in selfish greed
Such dealing Onund loves:[8]
Braggart! my bride is one
Born heiress, jewell'd dame.
Our oaths, great king, accept,
Oaths that are meet and true.'

Then Arinbjorn produced witnesses, twelve men, and all well chosen. These all had heard, being present, the reconciliation of Thorir and Bjorn, and they offered to the king and judges to swear to it. The judges were willing to accept their oath if the king forbade it not.

Then did queen Gunnhilda take the word:[9]

'Great wonder is this, sir king, that thou lettest this big Egil make such a coil of the whole cause before thee. Wouldst thou find nought to say against him, though he should claim at thy hand thy very kingdom? Now though thou wilt give no decision that may help Onund,[10] yet will not I brook this, that Egil tread under foot our friends and wrongfully take the property from Onund. Where is Alf my brother? Go thou, Alf, with thy following, where the judges are,[11] and let them not give this wrong judgment.'

Then he and his men went thither, and cut in sunder the precinct-ropes and tore down the poles, and scattered the judges. Great uproar was there in the Thing; but men there were all weaponless.

Then spake Egil: 'Can Bergonund hear my words?'

'I hear,' said Onund.

'Then do I challenge thee to combat,[12] and be our fight here at the Thing. Let him of us twain have this property, both lands and chattels, who wins the victory. But be thou every man's dastard if thou darest not.'

Whereupon king Eric made answer: 'If thou, Egil, art strongly set on fighting, then will we grant thee this forthwith.'

Egil replied: 'I will not fight with king's power and overwhelming force; but before equal numbers I will not flee, if this be given me. Nor will I then make any distinction of persons, titled or untitled.'

Then spake Arinbjorn: 'Go we away, Egil; we shall not here effect to-day anything that will be to our gain.'

And with this Arinbjorn and all his people turned to depart.

But Egil turned him and cried aloud: 'This do I protest before thee, Arinbjorn, and thee, Thord, and all men that now can hear my word, barons and lawmen and all people, that I ban all those lands that belonged to Bjorn Brynjolfsson, from building and tillage, and from all gain therefrom to be gotten. I ban them to thee, Bergonund, and to all others, natives and foreigners, high and low; and anyone who shall herein offend I denounce as a law-breaker, a peace breaker, and accursed.'

After which Egil went away with Arinbjorn.

They then went to their ships; and there was a rise in the ground of some extent to pass over, so that the ships were not visible from the Thing-field. Egil was very wroth. And when they came to the ships, Arinbjorn spoke before his people and said:

'All men know what has been the issue of the Thing here, that we have not got law; but the king is much in wrath, so that I expect our men will get hard measure from him if he can bring it about. I will now that every man embark on his ship and go home. Let none wait for other.'

Then Arinbjorn went on board his own ship, and to Egil he said: 'Now go you with your comrades on board the cutter that lies here outside the long-ship, and get you away at once. Travel by night so much as you may, and not by day, and be on your guard, for the king will seek to meet with you. Come and find me afterwards, when all this is ended, whatever may have chanced between you and the king.'

Egil did as Arinbjorn said; they went aboard the cutter, about thirty men, and rowed with all their might. The vessel was remarkably fast. Then rowed out of the haven many other ships of Arinbjorn's people, cutters and row-boats; but the long-ship which Arinbjorn steered went last, for it was the heaviest under oars. Egil's cutter, which he steered, soon outstripped the rest. Then Egil sang a stave:

'My heritage he steals,
The money-grasping heir
Of Thornfoot. But his threats,
Though fierce, I boldly meet.
For land we sought the law:
Land-grabbing loon is he!
But robbery of my right
Ere long he shall repay.'

References

  1. But when: "Formlega skiptir um við byrjun 57. kafla. Þá er tíðartengingin „ok er – “ alls ráðandi eins og „en er – “ í fyrri hluta. Ég gekk út frá forminu í þessum athugasemdum, sem styðst við tölulega rannsókn. Efnislega er þar líka um mörk að ræð. Frásögnin verður bæði skáldskaparkenndari, ýktari, í ætt við riddarasögur, og grófari og bendir til síðari tíma, jafnvel um og eftir 1250, sem þeta-brotið er ársett." Sveinn Bergsveinsson. Tveir höfundar Egils sögu (p. 115).
  2. full glad was he: "Þegar Egill kemur heim ... er Skalla-Grímur „feginn“ að sjá son sinn. Þetta er eina jákvæða lýsingarorðið sem er notað um samskipti þeirra feðga í allri sögunni." Ármann Jakobsson. Ástin á tímum þjóðveldisins (p. 74).
  3. it is not told: "Lesandinn [getur] ráðið af samhenginu að Egill skipti ekki fénu eins og Aðalsteinn hafði fyrir hann lagt, enda kemur það í ljós síðar meir í orðaskiptum hans og föður hans." Torfi H. Tulinius. „Er þess eigi getið“. Um stílbragð hjá Snorra Sturlusyni (p. 85).
  4. Bjorn, Hitadale's champion: "It should also be noted that the reference to Bjorn the Hitardale-Champion is appropriate at this stage, not only because he is Egil’s grand-nephew, but the heroic adventures of Egil in England remind us how Bjorn earned his nickname in Russia." Hermann Pálsson. The Borg Connexion (p. 60).
  5. Egil declares his business, and demands of Onund's sharing of the heritage of Bjorn.: "Atferli og kröfur Egils voru nauðsyn til að staðfesta samfélagslega stöðu hans sjálfs og fjölskyldu hans og afkomenda, enda þurfti táknrænar staðfestingar á skjallausum tímum. Og þessar táknrænu staðfestingar sem orð fóru af og voru vottaðar vitnum voru mikilvæg undirstaða mannvirðingar, mannhelgi og þeirrar samfélagsstöðu sem ættin, fjölskyldan og einstaklingurinn nutu. Egill er í raun ekki aðeins að berjast fyrir rétti sínum heldur er hann ekki síður að krefjast staðfestingar á samfélagsstöðu eiginkonu sinnar og framtíðarstöðu og framtíðarrétti afkomendanna." Jón Sigurðsson. „Nú er hér kominn Egill. Hefir hann ekki leitað brotthlaups“ (pp. 331-32).
  6. Thora was to have right of inheriting: "Hierauf antwortet sofort Arinbjörn, indem er sich zur Beweisführung darüber erbietet, dass bei dem zwischen seinem Vater und dem Björn höldr abgeschlossenen Vergleiche die Verleihung der Erbfähigkeit an Ásgerð ausbedungen worden sei, während er zugleich darauf hinweist, dass K. Eiríkr selbst wisse, dass er den Björn wieder in den Landfrieden gesetzt habe." Maurer, Konrad von. Zwei Rechtsfälle in der Eigla (pp. 96-97).
  7. king found no ready answer: "Um leið og Eiríkur ákvað að fara á svig við lagavenjur til að styðja sinn mann, vakti hann mótþróa sjálfseignarbænda. Það er ekki brýnt úrlausnarefni hvort Egill atti raunverulega kappi við konung eins og sagan segir frá. Hitt er þyngra á metum að hinn raunverulegi Eiríkur konungur var ofmetnaðarmaður og honum voru mislagðar hendur sem konungi. Hann varð að flýja Noreg eftir að hafa glatað stuðningi sjálfseignarbænda." Byock, Jesse L.. Egilssaga og samfélagsminni (p. 7).
  8. Shameless in selfish greed Such dealing Onund loves:: "Eitt er það í fari Egils Skalla-Grímssonar, er höfundur sögunnar hefur mjög í flimtingum, en það er fégirnd hans. [...] Er fróðlegt að sjá hversu hann [...] brigzlar öðrum um eigingirni." Finnbogi Guðmundsson. Gamansemi Egluhöfundar (p. 40).
  9. Then did queen Gunnhilda take the word: "Dabei wird der Leser von Gunnhilds scheinbar unmotivierter Feindseligkeit gegenüber Egil im Grunde überrascht; die Kausalitäten für den Giftanschlag sind kompliziert entwickelt. […] Eher ließen sich dafür die Triebkräfte in Anschlag bringen, die die Spannungsgeladene Stimmung hervorgerufen haben und die sich im Freudschen Sinne festmachen lassen". Heinrichs, Anne. Gunnhild Özurardóttir und Egil Skalla-Grímsson im Kampf um Leben und Tod (p. 96).
  10. that may help Onund: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] ""En Önundur er besti maður innanlands, vinur okkar, og þú lætur á hann ganga rangan dóm fyrir lygiframburð skálda og bófa og er af þessu augljóst að þú hillir hann til skammarverka." This example amply illustrates one characteristic of ‘New Egil’s Saga,’ namely that conversations are wordier and prone to hyperbole (cf. “you let him incur a wrongful judgment because of false testimony from rhymesters and thugs”). The vocabulary is very different from the medieval version, and the syntax is characterized by long sentences with paratactic clauses connected by og (“and”).” Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (p. 182).
  11. where the judges are: “But when the judges declared themselves willing, to let Egil’s testimony confirm on oath, orders the queen her brother and his followers to make an end at the whole sitting of the court. That is cutting the Gordian knot, but no solution. Also in this case, it seems likely, that the author had been handed over material, that contained insecurities. A certain respect for the material that was handed over made that he couldn’t conceal this, at the most blur it” (Dutch text: “Maar als de rechters zich bereid verklaren, Egils verklaringen onder ede te laten bevestigen, laat de koningin door haar broer en diens volgelingen een eind maken aan de hele rechtszitting. Dat is een Gordiaanse knoop doorhakken maar géén oplossing. Ook hier lijkt het waarschijnlijk, dat de auteur materiaal overgeleverd had gekregen, dat hem voor onzekerheden plaatste. Een zekere eerbied voor die overlevering maakte, dat hij dit niet kon verhelen, hoogstens verdoezelen”). Kroesen, Jacoba M.C.. Inleiding (p. XLI).
  12. Then do I challenge thee to combat: "These combats of Egil and Grim resemble a second form of combat in Iceland, theoretically distinct from hólmganga, and yet similar to it in many respects. The einvígi, or single combat, was, like holmgang, a contest between two men, but, unlike holmgang, it was not governed by a set of rules. Yet the two terms were sometimes confused.“ Jones, Gwyn. Some Characteristics of the Icelandic ‘Hólmganga’ (p. 116).

Kafli 57

Egill bjó um vorið kaupskip til Íslandsferðar. Réð Arinbjörn honum það að staðfestast ekki í Noregi meðan ríki Gunnhildar væri svo mikið „því að hún er allþung til þín,“ segir Arinbjörn, „og hefir þetta mikið um spillt er þér Eyvindur fundust við Jótland.“

Og er[1] Egill var búinn og byr gaf þá siglir hann í haf og greiddist hans ferð vel. Kemur hann um haustið til Íslands og hélt til Borgarfjarðar. Hann hafði þá verið utan tólf vetur. Gerðist þá Skalla-Grímur maður gamall. Varð hann þá feginn[2] er Egill kom heim. Fór Egill til Borgar að vistum og með honum Þorfinnur strangi og þeir mjög margir saman. Voru þeir með Skalla-Grími um veturinn. Egill hafði þar ógrynni fjár en ekki er þess getið[3] að Egill skipti silfri því er Aðalsteinn konungur hafði fengið honum í hendur, hvorki við Skalla-Grím né aðra menn.

Þann vetur fékk Þorfinnur Sæunnar dóttur Skalla-Gríms og eftir um vorið fékk Skalla-Grímur þeim bústað að Langárfossi og land inn frá Leirulæk milli Langár og Álftár allt til fjalls. Dóttir Þorfinns og Sæunnar var Þórdís er átti Arngeir í Hólmi, son Bersa goðlauss. Þeirra son var Björn Hítdælakappi.[4]

Egill dvaldist þá með Skalla-Grími nokkura vetur. Tók hann til fjárforráða og búsumsýslu engu miður Skalla-Grími. Egill gerðist enn snoðinn.

Þá tók héraðið að byggjast víða. Hrómundur, bróðir Gríms hins háleyska, byggði þá í Þverárhlíð og skipverjar hans. Hrómundur var faðir Gunnlaugs, föður Þuríðar dyllu, móður Illuga svarta.

Egill hafði þá verið svo að vetrum skipti mjög mörgum að Borg. Þá var það á einu sumri er skip komu af Noregi til Íslands að þau tíðindi spurðust austan að Björn höldur var andaður. Það fylgdi þeirri sögn að fé það allt er Björn hafði átt hafði upp tekið Berg-Önundur mágur hans. Hann hafði flutt heim til sín alla lausaaura en jarðir hafði hann byggt og skilið sér allar landskyldir. Hann hafði og sinni eigu kastað á jarðir þær allar er Björn hafði átt.

Og er Egill heyrði þetta þá spurði hann vandlega hvort Berg-Önundur mundi sínum ráðum fram hafa farið um þetta eða hefði hann traust til haft sér meiri manna. Honum var sagt að Önundur var kominn í vináttu mikla við Eirík konung og við Gunnhildi þó miklu kærra.

Egill lét það kyrrt vera á því hausti. En er veturinn leið af og vora tók þá lét Egill setja fram skip það er hann átti er staðið hafði í hrófi við Langárfoss. Hann bjó skip það til hafs og fékk menn til. Ásgerður kona hans var ráðin til farar en Þórdís dóttir Þórólfs var eftir. Egill sigldi í haf er hann var búinn. Er frá hans ferð ekki að segja fyrr en hann kemur til Noregs. Hélt hann þegar til fundar við Arinbjörn sem fyrst mátti hann. Arinbjörn tók vel við honum og bauð Agli með sér að vera og það þekktist hann. Fóru þau Ásgerður bæði þangað og nokkurir menn með þeim.

Egill kom brátt á ræður við Arinbjörn um fjárheimtur þær er Egill þóttist eiga þar í landi.

Arinbjörn segir: „Það mál þykir mér óvænlegt. Berg-Önundur er harður og ódæll, ranglátur og fégjarn, en hann hefir nú hald mikið af konungi og drottningu. Er Gunnhildur hinn mesti óvinur þinn, sem þú veist áður, og mun hún ekki fýsa Önund að hann geri greiða á málinu.“

Egill segir: „Konungur mun oss láta ná lögum og réttindum á máli þessu en með liðveislu þinni þá vex mér ekki í augu að leita laga við Berg-Önund.“

Ráða þeir það af að Egill skipar skútu. Fóru þeir þar á nær tveir tigir. Þeir fóru suður á Hörðaland og koma fram á Aski. Ganga þeir þar til húss og hitta Önund. Ber þá Egill upp mál sín og krefur Önund skiptis um arf Bjarnar[5] og segir að dætur Bjarnar væru jafnkomnar til arfs eftir hann að lögum „þó að mér þyki,“ kvað Egill, „sem Ásgerður muni þykja ættborin miklu betur en Gunnhildur kona þín.“

Önundur segir þá snellt mjög: „Þú ert furðulega djarfur maður Egill, útlagi Eiríks konungs, er þú ferð hingað í land hans og ætlar hér til ágangs við menn hans. Máttu svo ætla Egill að eg hefi velta látið slíka sem þú ert og af minnum sökum en mér þykja þessar, er þú telur til arfs fyrir hönd konu þinnar, því að það er kunnigt alþýðu að hún er þýborin að móðerni.“ Önundur var málóði um hríð.

Og er Egill sá að Önundur vildi engan hlut greiða um þetta mál þá stefnir Egill honum þing og skýtur málinu til Gulaþingslaga.

Önundur segir: „Koma mun eg til Gulaþings og mundi eg vilja að þú kæmir þaðan eigi heill í brott.“

Egill segir að hann mun til þess hætta að koma þó til þings allt að einu „verður þá sem má hversu málum vorum lýkur.“

Fara þeir Egill síðan í brott og er hann kom heim segir hann Arinbirni frá ferð sinni og frá svörum Önundar. Arinbjörn varð reiður mjög er Þóra föðursystir hans var kölluð ambátt.

Arinbjörn fór á fund Eiríks konungs, bar upp fyrir hann þetta mál.

Konungur tók heldur þungt hans máli og segir að Arinbjörn hefði lengi fylgt mjög málum Egils „hefir hann notið þín að því er eg hefi látið hann vera hér í landi en nú mun mér örðigt þykja ef þú heldur hann til þess að hann gangi á vini mína.“

Arinbjörn segir: „Þú munt láta oss ná lögum af þessu máli.“

Konungur var heldur styggur í þessu máli. Arinbjörn fann að drottning mundi þó miklu verr viljuð. Fer Arinbjörn aftur og sagði að heldur horfir óvænt.

Líður af veturinn og kemur þar er menn fara til Gulaþings. Arinbjörn fjölmennti mjög til þings. Var Egill í för með honum. Eiríkur konungur var þar og hafði fjölmenni mikið. Berg-Önundur var í sveit konungs og þeir bræður og höfðu þeir sveit mikla. En er þinga skyldi um mál manna þá gengu hvorirtveggju þar til er dómurinn var settur að flytja fram sannindi sín. Var Önundur þá allstórorður.

En þar er dómurinn var settur var völlur sléttur og settar niður heslistengur í völlinn í hring en lögð um utan snæri umhverfis. Voru það kölluð vébönd. En fyrir innan í hringinum sátu dómendur, tólf úr Firðafylki og tólf úr Sygnafylki, tólf úr Hörðafylki. Þær þrennar tylftir manna skyldu þar dæma um mál öll. Arinbjörn réð fyrir hverjir dómendur voru úr Firðafylki en Þórður af Aurlandi hverjir úr Sygnafylki voru og voru þeir allir eins liðs.

Arinbjörn hafði fjölmenni mikið til þings, snekkju alskipaða og margt smáskipa, skútur og róðrarferjur er bændur áttu. Eiríkur konungur hafði þar mikið lið og langskip sex eða sjö. Þar var og mikið lið af bóndum.

Egill hóf svo mál sitt að hann krafði dómendur að dæma sér lög af máli þeirra Önundar. Innti hann þá hver sannindi hann hafði í tilkalli til fjár þess er átt hafði Björn Brynjólfsson. Sagði hann að Ásgerður, dóttir Bjarnar, eiginkona Egils, var tilkomin arfs og óðalborin í allar ættir en tiginborin fram í kyn. Krafði hann dómendur að dæma Ásgerði til handa hálfan arf Bjarnar, lönd og lausaaura.

Og er hann hætti sinni ræðu þá tók Berg-Önundur til máls: „Gunnhildur kona mín er dóttir Bjarnar og Ólafar, þeirrar konu er Björn hafði lögfengið. Er Gunnhildur réttur erfingi Bjarnar. Tók eg fyrir þá sök upp fé það allt er Björn hafði átt að eg vissi að sú ein var dóttir Bjarnar önnur er ekki átti arf að taka. Var móðir hennar hernumin og tekin síðan frillutaki og ekki að frændaráði og flutt land af landi. En þú Egill ætlar að fara hér sem hvarvetna annars staðar með ofurkapp þitt og ójafnað. Nú mun þér það ekki hér tjá því að Eiríkur konungur og Gunnhildur drottning hafa mér því heitið að eg skuli rétt hafa af hverju máli þar er þeirra ríki stendur yfir. Mun eg færa fram sönn vitni fyrir konungi og drottningu og dómendum að Þóra hlaðhönd móðir Ásgerðar var hertekin heiman frá Þóri bróður sínum og annað sinn af Aurlandi frá Brynjólfi. Fór hún þá land af landi með Birni og víkingum og útlögum konungs og í þeirri útlegð gátu þau mey þessa, Ásgerði. Nú er furða mikil um Egil er hann ætlar að gera ómæt öll mál Eiríks konungs. Það fyrst að þú ert hér í landi síðan Eiríkur gerði þig útlægan og það enn er meira, þótt þú hafir fengið ambáttar, að kalla hana arfgenga. Vil eg þess krefja dómendur að þeir dæmi mér allan arf eftir Björn en dæmi Ásgerði ambátt konungs því að hún var svo getin að faðir hennar og móðir voru í útlegð konungs.“

Þá tók Arinbjörn til máls: „Vitni munum vér fram bera konungur um þetta mál og láta eiða fylgja að það var til skilið í sætt þeirra Þóris föður míns og Bjarnar að Ásgerður, dóttir þeirra Bjarnar og Þóru, var til arfs tekin[6] eftir föður sinn og svo það sem yður var kunnigt sjálfum konungur að þú gerðir Björn innlendan og öllu því máli var þá lokið er áður hafði í milli staðið sættar manna.“

Konungur svarar seint[7] hans máli.

Þá kvað Egill vísu:

Þýborna kveðr þorna
þorn reið ár horna,
sýslir hann of sína
síngirnd Önundr, mína.[8]
Naddhristir, á eg nesta
norn til arfs of borna.
Þigg þú, Auða konr, eiða,
eiðsært er það, greiða.

Þá tók til máls Gunnhildur drottning:[9] „Það er undarlegt konungur er þú lætur Egil þenna hinn mikla vefja öll mál fyrir þér, eða hvort mundir þú eigi í móti mæla þó að hann kallaði til konungdómsins í hendur þér? Nú þótt þú viljir enga úrskurði þá veita er Önundi sé lið[10] að þá skal eg það eigi þola að Egill troði undir fótum vini vora og taki með rangindum fé þetta af Önundi. Eða hvar ertu Askmaður? Far þú til með sveit þína þar dómendurnir eru[11] og lát eigi dæma rangindi þessi.“

Síðan hljóp Askmaður til dómsins og hans sveitungar og skáru í sundur véböndin en brutu niður stengur en hleyptu í brott dómendum. Þá gerðist þys mikill á þinginu en allir menn voru þar vopnlausir.

Þá mælti Egill: „Má Berg-Önundur heyra mál mitt?“

„Heyri eg,“ sagði hann.

„Eg vil bjóða þér hólmgöngu[12] og berjumst hér á þinginu. Hafi sá fé þetta, lönd og lausaaura, er sigur fær en ver þú hvers manns níðingur ef þú þorir eigi.“

Þá svarar Eiríkur konungur: „Ef þú Egill ert nú allfús til að berjast þá skulum vér nú veita þér það.“

Egill svarar: „Ekki vil eg berjast við konungs ríki og ofurefli liðs en fyrir jafnmörgum mönnum mun eg eigi flýja ef mér skal þess unna. Mun eg að því gera engan mannamun.“

Þá mælti Arinbjörn: „Förum í brott Egill, ekki munum vér hér um sýsla að sinni.“

Sneri þá Arinbjörn á brott og allt lið hans með honum.

Þá snerist Egill aftur og mælti hátt: „Það skírskota eg undir þig, Arinbjörn, og þig, Þórður, og þá menn alla er nú heyra mál mitt, lenda menn og lögmenn og alla alþýðu, að eg banna jarðir þær allar, er átt hefir Björn Brynjólfsson, að byggja og vinna og allra gagna af að neyta. Banna eg þér, Berg-Önundur, og öllum öðrum mönnum, útlenskum og innlenskum, tignum og ótignum, en hverjum er það gerir legg eg við lagabrot landsréttar, goðagremi og griðarof.“

Síðan gekk Egill á brott með Arinbirni. Gengu þeir til skipanna og var þar að ganga yfir leiti nokkuð og eigi allskammt svo að eigi sá skipin af þingvellinum.

Og er þeir komu til skipanna talaði Arinbjörn fyrir liðinu og mælti svo: „Öllum yður er kunnigt hver þinglok hér hafa orðið, að vér höfum eigi náð lögum en konungur er reiður svo að mér er von að vorir menn sæti af honum afarkostum ef hann má svo við komast. Vil eg að hver gangi á sitt skip og fari sem ákafast til síns heimilis. Bíði nú engi annars.“

Síðan gekk Arinbjörn á skip sitt og mælti til Egils: „Gakk þú nú á skútu er hér liggur á útborða langskipinu og ver á brottu sem skjótast, farið um nætur sem þér megið en eigi um daga og forðið yður því að konungur mun eftir leita að fundi yðra mætti saman bera. Leitið enn síðan til mín þá er þessu lýkur, hvað sem í kann berast.“

Egill gerði svo sem Arinbjörn mælti. Gengu þeir á skútuna þrír tigir manna og reru sem ákafast. Skipið var einkar skjótt. Þá reri fjöldi manna út úr höfninni af liði Arinbjarnar, skútur og róðrarferjur, en langskip sem Arinbjörn stýrði fór síðast því að það var þyngst undir árum. En skúta sú er Egill var á gekk brátt fram úr samflotinu. Þá kvað Egill:

Erfingi réð arfi
arflyndr fyr mér svarfa,
mæti eg hans og heitum
hótun, Þyrnifótar.
Vargi er simla sorgar
slíkt rán, er eg gef honum,
vér deildum, fjöt foldar,
fold væringja, goldið.

Tilvísanir

  1. og er: "Formlega skiptir um við byrjun 57. kafla. Þá er tíðartengingin „ok er – “ alls ráðandi eins og „en er – “ í fyrri hluta. Ég gekk út frá forminu í þessum athugasemdum, sem styðst við tölulega rannsókn. Efnislega er þar líka um mörk að ræð. Frásögnin verður bæði skáldskaparkenndari, ýktari, í ætt við riddarasögur, og grófari og bendir til síðari tíma, jafnvel um og eftir 1250, sem þeta-brotið er ársett." Sveinn Bergsveinsson. Tveir höfundar Egils sögu (s. 115).
  2. varð hann þá feginn: "Þegar Egill kemur heim ... er Skalla-Grímur „feginn“ að sjá son sinn. Þetta er eina jákvæða lýsingarorðið sem er notað um samskipti þeirra feðga í allri sögunni." Ármann Jakobsson. Ástin á tímum þjóðveldisins (s. 74).
  3. ekki er þess getið: "Lesandinn [getur] ráðið af samhenginu að Egill skipti ekki fénu eins og Aðalsteinn hafði fyrir hann lagt, enda kemur það í ljós síðar meir í orðaskiptum hans og föður hans." Torfi H. Tulinius. „Er þess eigi getið“. Um stílbragð hjá Snorra Sturlusyni (s. 85).
  4. Björn Hítdælakappi: "It should also be noted that the reference to Bjorn the Hitardale-Champion is appropriate at this stage, not only because he is Egil’s grand-nephew, but the heroic adventures of Egil in England remind us how Bjorn earned his nickname in Russia." Hermann Pálsson. The Borg Connexion (s. 60).
  5. Ber þá Egill upp mál sín og krefur Önund skiptis um arf Bjarnar : " Atferli og kröfur Egils voru nauðsyn til að staðfesta samfélagslega stöðu hans sjálfs og fjölskyldu hans og afkomenda, enda þurfti táknrænar staðfestingar á skjallausum tímum. Og þessar táknrænu staðfestingar sem orð fóru af og voru vottaðar vitnum voru mikilvæg undirstaða mannvirðingar, mannhelgi og þeirrar samfélagsstöðu sem ættin, fjölskyldan og einstaklingurinn nutu. Egill er í raun ekki aðeins að berjast fyrir rétti sínum heldur er hann ekki síður að krefjast staðfestingar á samfélagsstöðu eiginkonu sinnar og framtíðarstöðu og framtíðarrétti afkomendanna." Jón Sigurðsson. „Nú er hér kominn Egill. Hefir hann ekki leitað brotthlaups“ (s. 331-32).
  6. var til arfs tekin: "Hierauf antwortet sofort Arinbjörn, indem er sich zur Beweisführung darüber erbietet, dass bei dem zwischen seinem Vater und dem Björn höldr abgeschlossenen Vergleiche die Verleihung der Erbfähigkeit an Ásgerð ausbedungen worden sei, während er zugleich darauf hinweist, dass K. Eiríkr selbst wisse, dass er den Björn wieder in den Landfrieden gesetzt habe." Maurer, Konrad von. Zwei Rechtsfälle in der Eigla (s. 96-97).
  7. Konungur svarar seint: "Um leið og Eiríkur ákvað að fara á svig við lagavenjur til að styðja sinn mann, vakti hann mótþróa sjálfseignarbænda. Það er ekki brýnt úrlausnarefni hvort Egill atti raunverulega kappi við konung eins og sagan segir frá. Hitt er þyngra á metum að hinn raunverulegi Eiríkur konungur var ofmetnaðarmaður og honum voru mislagðar hendur sem konungi. Hann varð að flýja Noreg eftir að hafa glatað stuðningi sjálfseignarbænda." Byock, Jesse L.. Egilssaga og samfélagsminni (s. 7).
  8. sýslir hann of sína síngirnd Önundr, mína: "Eitt er það í fari Egils Skalla-Grímssonar, er höfundur sögunnar hefur mjög í flimtingum, en það er fégirnd hans. [...] Er fróðlegt að sjá hversu hann [...] brigzlar öðrum um eigingirni." Finnbogi Guðmundsson. Gamansemi Egluhöfundar (s. 40).
  9. Þá tók til máls Gunnhildur : „Dabei wird der Leser von Gunnhilds scheinbar unmotivierter Feindseligkeit gegenüber Egil im Grunde überrascht; die Kausalitäten für den Giftanschlag sind kompliziert entwickelt. […] Eher ließen sich dafür die Triebkräfte in Anschlag bringen, die die Spannungsgeladene Stimmung hervorgerufen haben und die sich im Freudschen Sinne festmachen lassen“. Heinrichs, Anne. Gunnhild Özurardóttir und Egil Skalla-Grímsson im Kampf um Leben und Tod (s. 96).
  10. er Önundi sé lið: [The scene in Vitlausu Eglu:] ""En Önundur er besti maður innanlands, vinur okkar, og þú lætur á hann ganga rangan dóm fyrir lygiframburð skálda og bófa og er af þessu augljóst að þú hillir hann til skammarverka." This example amply illustrates one characteristic of ‘New Egil’s Saga,’ namely that conversations are wordier and prone to hyperbole (cf. “you let him incur a wrongful judgment because of false testimony from rhymesters and thugs”). The vocabulary is very different from the medieval version, and the syntax is characterized by long sentences with paratactic clauses connected by og (“and”).” Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir. Egil Strikes Again (s. 182).
  11. þar dómendurnir eru: “But when the judges declared themselves willing, to let Egil’s testimony confirm on oath, orders the queen her brother and his followers to make an end at the whole sitting of the court. That is cutting the Gordian knot, but no solution. Also in this case, it seems likely, that the author had been handed over material, that contained insecurities. A certain respect for the material that was handed over made that he couldn’t conceal this, at the most blur it” (Dutch text: “Maar als de rechters zich bereid verklaren, Egils verklaringen onder ede te laten bevestigen, laat de koningin door haar broer en diens volgelingen een eind maken aan de hele rechtszitting. Dat is een Gordiaanse knoop doorhakken maar géén oplossing. Ook hier lijkt het waarschijnlijk, dat de auteur materiaal overgeleverd had gekregen, dat hem voor onzekerheden plaatste. Een zekere eerbied voor die overlevering maakte, dat hij dit niet kon verhelen, hoogstens verdoezelen”). Kroesen, Jacoba M.C.. Inleiding (s. XLI).
  12. Eg vil bjóða þér hólmgöngu: "These combats of Egil and Grim resemble a second form of combat in Iceland, theoretically distinct from hólmganga, and yet similar to it in many respects. The einvígi, or single combat, was, like holmgang, a contest between two men, but, unlike holmgang, it was not governed by a set of rules. Yet the two terms were sometimes confused.“ Jones, Gwyn. Some Characteristics of the Icelandic ‘Hólmganga’ (s. 116).

Links

Personal tools