Egla, 61

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 61

Egil's voyage to England[1]

King Eric ruled over Norway one year after the death of his father king Harold, before Hacon Athelstan's foster-son, another son of Harold, came out of the west from England; and in that same summer Egil Skallagrimsson went to Iceland. Hacon went northwards to Throndheim. He was there accepted as king. He and Eric were for the winter both king in Norway. But in the following spring each gathered an army. Hacon had by far the larger numbers; the reason of this was that he made it law in the land that every man should own his patrimony, where king Harold had enslaved all, rich and poor alike. Eric saw no other choice but to flee the land; so he went abroad with Gunnhilda his wife and their children. Lord Arinbjorn was king Eric's foster-brother, and foster-father of his son. Dear to the king was he above all his barons; the king had set him as ruler over all the Firth-folk. Arinbjorn was with the king when he left the land; they first went westwards over the main to the Orkneys. There Eric gave his daughter Ragnhildr[2] in marriage to earl Arnfinn.[3] After that he went south with his force along the coast of Scotland, and harried there; thence still south to England, and harried there. And when king Athelstan heard of this, he gathered force and went against Eric. But when they met, terms were proposed, and the terms were that king Athelstan gave to Eric the government of Northumberland; and he was to be for king Athelstan defender of the land against the Scots and Irish. Athelstan had made Scotland tributary under him after the death of king Olaf, but that people were constantly disloyal to him. The story goes[4] that Gunnhilda had a spell worked, this spell being that Egil Skallagrimsson should find no rest in Iceland till she had seen him. But in that summer when Hacon and Eric had met and contended for Norway, all travel to any land from Norway was forbidden; so in that summer there came to Iceland from Norway neither ship nor tidings. Egil Skallagrimsson abode at his home.

But during the second winter that he was living at Borg after Skallagrim's death Egil became melancholy, and this was more marked as the winter wore on. And when summer came, Egil let it be known that he meant to make ready his ship for a voyage out in the summer. He then got a crew. He purposed to sail to England. [5]They were thirty men on the ship. Asgerdr remained behind, and took charge of the house. Egil's purpose was to seek king Athelstan and look after the promise that he had made to Egil at their last parting.

It was late ere Egil was ready, and when he put to sea, the winds delayed him. Autumn then came on, and rough weather set in. They sailed past the north coast of the Orkneys. Egil would not put in there, for he thought king Eric's power would be supreme all over the islands. Then they sailed southwards past Scotland, and had great storms and cross winds. Weathering the Scotch coast they held on southwards along England; but on the evening of a day, as darkness came on, it blew a gale. Before they were aware, breakers were both seaward and ahead. There was nothing for it but to make for land, and this they did. Under sail they ran ashore, and came to land at Humber-mouth. All the men were saved, and most of the cargo, but as for the ship, that was broken to pieces.

When they found men to speak with, they learnt these tidings, which Egil thought good, that with king Athelstan all was well and with his kingdom: but other tidings were there which Egil thought dangerous, to wit, that king Eric Bloodaxe was there and Gunnhilda, and they had the government of the province, and Eric was but a short way up the country in the town of York.[6] This also Egil learnt, that lord Arinbjorn was there with the king, and in great friendship with him.

And when Egil got to know these tidings, he resolved what to do.[7] He thought he had little hope of escape, though he should try to conceal himself and to go disguised as long as he might till he were clear of Eric's dominions. For he was at that time easily known by such as should see him. He thought also it were a mean man's fate to be captured in such flight. So he took a bold heart, and resolved that at once, in that very night when they came there, he would get him a horse and ride to the town.[8] He came there in the evening, and rode at once into the town. He had now a hood drawn over his helm[9], and was fully armed.

Egil inquired where in the town Arinbjorn was housed. It was told him. Thither he rode to the house.[10] When he came to the hall-door, he dismounted from his horse, and found a man to speak to. It was told him that Arinbjorn sat at meat.

Egil said: 'I would fain, good fellow, you should go into the hall and ask Arinbjorn whether he will rather speak without or within to Egil Skallagrimsson.'

The man said: Tis but little trouble for me to do this errand.'

He went into the hall, and spoke quite loud: 'There is a man come here out before the door,' said he, 'big as a giant,[11][12] and he begged me go in and ask whether thou wouldst rather without or within speak to Egil Skallagrimsson.'

Arinbjorn said: 'Go and beg him to bide without, nor shall he need to bide long.'

He did as Arinbjorn told him, went out and said what had been said to him.

Arinbjorn bade take up the tables; then went he out and all his house-carles with him.

And when Arinbjorn met Egil, he greeted him well, and asked why he was come there.

Egil in few words told him clearly of his journey: 'And now you shall see what counsel I ought to take, if you will give me any help.'

'Have you,' said Arinbjorn, 'before you came to this house met any men in the town who are likely to have known you?'

'None,' said Egil.

'Let men then take their weapons,' said Arinbjorn.

They did so. But when all were armed, then went they to the king's house. And when they came to the hall, then Arinbjorn knocked at the door, asking them to open, and saying who was there. The door-keepers at once opened the door. The king was sitting at table.

Arinbjorn then bade that they should go in twelve in number, naming for this Egil and ten others. 'Now shall you, Egil, bring the king your head and clasp his foot, but I will be your spokesman.'[13]

Then they went in.[14] Arinbjorn went before the king and saluted him. The king received him, and asked what he would have.

Arinbjorn said: 'I lead hither one who has come a long way to seek thee in thy place, and to be reconciled to thee. Great is this honour[15] to thee, my lord, when thine enemies travel of their own free will from other lands, and deem they cannot endure thy wrath though thou be nowhere near. Now show thyself princely to this man. Let him get of thee good terms, seeing that he hath so magnified thine honour, as thou now mayst see, by braving many seas and dangers to come hither from his own home. No compulsion drove him to this journey, nought but goodwill to thee.'

Then the king looked round, and saw over men's heads where Egil stood. The king knew him at once, and, darting a keen glance at him, said: 'How wert thou so bold,[16] Egil, that thou daredst to come before me? Thy last parting from me was such that of life thou couldst have from me no hope.'

Then went Egil up to the table, and clasped the foot of the king.[17] He then sang:

'With cross-winds far cruising
I came on my wave-horse,
Eric England's warder
Eager soon to see.
Now wielder of wound-flash,
Wight dauntless in daring,
That strong strand of Harold's
Stout lineage I meet.'

King Eric said: 'I need not to count the crimes on thy hands, for they are so many and great that each one might well warrant that thou go not hence alive. Thou hast nothing else to expect but that here thou must die. This thou mightest know before, that thou wouldst get no terms from me.'

Gunnhilda said: 'Why shall not Egil be slain[18] at once? Rememberest thou no more, O king, what Egil hath done to thee, slain thy friends and kin, ay, even thine own son to boot, and cursed thyself? Where ever was it known that a king was thus dealt with[19]?'

Arinbjorn said: 'If Egil have spoken evil of the king, for that he can now atone in words of praise that shall live for all time.'

Gunnhilda said: 'We will hear none of his praise. O king, bid Egil be led out and beheaded. I will neither hear his words nor see him.'

Then said Arinbjorn: 'The king will not let himself be egged on to all thy dastardly work. He will not have Egil slain by night, for night-slaying is murder.'

The king said: 'So shall it be, Arinbjorn, as thou demandest. Egil shall live this night. Take thou him home with thee, and bring him to me in the morning.'

Arinbjorn thanked the king for his words: 'We hope, my lord, that henceforth Egil's cause will take a better turn. And though Egil has done great wrong against thee, yet look thou on this, that he has suffered much from thee and thy kin. King Harold thy father took the life of Thorolf, a man of renown, Egil's father's brother, for the slander of bad men, for no crime at all. And thou, O king, didst break the law in Egil's case for the sake of Bergonund; nay further thou didst wish to doom his death, and didst slay his men, and plunder all his goods, and withal didst make him an outlaw and drive him from the land. And Egil is one who will stand no teasing. But in every cause under judgment one must look on the act with its reasons. I will now have Egil in keeping for the night.'

Then Arinbjorn and Egil went back to the house, and when they came in they two went into a small upper room and talked over this matter. Arinbjorn said: 'The king just now was very wroth, yet methought his mood rather softened before the end, and fortune will now decide what may be the upshot. I know that Gunnhilda will set all her mind on marring your cause. Now I would fain that we take this counsel: that you be awake through the night, and compose a song of praise about king Eric. I should think it had best be a poem of twenty stanzas, and you might recite it to-morrow when we come before the king. Thus did Bragi my kinsman,[20] when he was under the wrath of Bjorn king of Sweden; he composed a poem of praise about him in one night, and for it received his head. Now may we also have the same luck with the king, that you may make your peace with him, if you can offer him the poem of praise.'

Egil said: 'I shall try [21] this counsel that you wish, but 'twas the last thing I ever meant, to sing king Eric's praises.'

Arinbjorn bade him try.

Then Arinbjorn went away, and had food and drink carried to the upper room. Egil was there alone for the night. Arinbjorn went to his men, and they sate over drink till midnight. Then Arinbjorn and his men went to the sleeping chambers, but before undressing he went up to the room to Egil, and asked how he was getting on with the poem.

Egil said that nothing was done. 'Here,' said he, 'has sate a swallow by the window and twittered all night, so that I have never got rest for that same.'

Whereupon Arinbjorn went away and out by the door leading up to the house-roof, and he sate by the window of the upper room where the bird had before sate. He saw that something of a shape witch-possest[22] moved away from the roof. Arinbjorn sate there by the window all night till dawn. But after Arinbjorn had come there, Egil composed all the poem, and got it so by heart[23] that he could recite it[24] in the morning when he met Arinbjorn. They watched for a fit time to go before the king.

References

  1. Egil's voyage to England: "Mellom Egils besøk I England hos kong Erik blodøks (kap. 59) og Skallagrims ferd til kong Harald for å be om bøter for Torolv (kap. 25) fins det ikke mindre enn 7 likhedspunkter. 1) Skallagrim kommer með 11 mann; de er altså 12 I alt: Arinbjørn bad 12 mann gå inn til kong Erik. 2)Skallagrim har talsmann hos kongen, Olve Nuva: Egil har en talsmann hos Kongen, Arinbjørn herse. 3) Ved ankomsten spør Grim og hans menn etter tidender: Ved ankomsten får Egil og hans menn høre visse tidender. 4) Grim sender bud til Olve for å få tale med ham: Egil sender bud til Arinbjørn for å få tale med ham. 5) Olve går fram til kongen, og Skallagrim står bak ham: Arinbjørn går fram til kongen, og Egil følger etter ham. 6) Olve legger inn et godt ord for Grim: Arinbjørnlegger inn et godt ord for Egil. 7)Kongen ser en man bak Olve some r et hode høyere enn andre men og skallet: Erik blodøks ser over hodene til de andre mennene hvis Egil står. " Jakobsen, Alfred. Om parallellepisoder i Egils saga (p. 316).
  2. Eric gave his daughter Ragnhildr: "While I can imagine the author of Egils saga or the Separate Saga of St. Óláfr revising his earlier ideas as he worked out the chronology of Haraldr gráfeldr’s life and placing Ragnhildr’s marriage as late as possible, I cannot imagine the author of Heimskringla jettisoning his carefully worked-out chronology for a simplifi ed one that made the age problem even worse. In any case, Egils saga’s account of Eiríkr’s movements agrees not with Heimskringla but with the Separate Saga of St. Óláfr, which scholars agree preceded Heimskringla." Cormack, Margaret. Heimskringla, Egils saga, and the Daughter of Eiríkr blóðøx (p. 66).
  3. Eric gave his daughter Ragnhildr in marriage to earl Arnfinn.: "Það er auðsjáanlega skakt í Eg. [ils sögu] (59 k., 62 k.), að Eiríkr hafi gipt Arnfinni Jarli í Orkneyjum Regnhildi dóttur sína, þegar er hann kom til eyjanna eptir flóttann frá Noregi, því að þá hefði hún hlotið að vera barn að aldri, og er hitt miklu eðlilegra og sjálfsagt nær hinu sanna, sem segir í Hkr., að Gunnhildur og synir hennar hafi gipt hana löngu síðar, áður en þau fóru til Danmerkur frá Orkneyjum" Jón Jónsson. Um Eirík blóðöx (p. 190).
  4. The story goes : " höfundar Íslendingasagna voru ekki safnarar og skrifarar munnmæla heldur skáld og skapandi rithöfundar. Í sumum (jafnvel flestum) Íslendingasögum er beinlínis vitnað til munnmæla með orðum eins og „svo er sagt“, „sumir segja“ o.fl. því líkt. En vitanlega kann í sumum tilfellum vera um að ræða listabragð: „Svo er sagt að Gunnhildur lét seið efla...“ [...] Með slíkum orðum svarar söguhöfundur fyrir fram þeim sem kunni að vefengja frásögina." Bjarni Einarsson. Íslendingadrápa (p. 130).
  5. He purposed to sail to England.: " Jórvíkurfrásögnin af Agli við hirð Eiríks blóðaxar og Gunnhildar og frásagan af höfuðlausn Óttars svarta eru um margt líkar þó vissulega séu sakarefni fleiri í Egils sögu. Í báðum tilvikum er konungur reiður skáldi fyrir kveðskap. Skáldið er í vörslu. Háttsettur konungsmaður ráðleggur skáldinu að yrkja drápurá ákveðnum tíma (þremur nóttum/ einni nóttu). Konungsmaður vitjar skáldsins um nótt. Við hirðina eru ákveðnir aðilar lítt hliðhollir skáldi en konungsmaðurinn heldur uppi vörnum. Drottning er viðstödd enda tengist hún atburðum (hún er ekki sjáanleg í eldri frásögnum af Óttari) og konungshjónin eru ekki sammála um afdrif skáldsins. Konungur lætur skáldið þiggja höfuð sitt „ í þessu sinni“ / „ að sinni“ fyrir drápuna og skáldið segir að höfuð sitt sé ljótt. Kvæðið heitir Höfuðlausn. " Baldur Hafstað. Sighvatur Þórðarsson og Egils saga (p. 111).
  6. the town of York: "Dass sich im einzelnen nun die vorgänge am königshofe zu York unmöglich so abgespielt haben konnten, wie sie die Eigla in den langen reden und verhandlungen Arinsbjörns mit dem könige Erich und dessen gemahlin Gunnhild schildert, ist schon von andern forschern hervorgehoben." Niedner, Felix. Egils Hauptlösung (p. 108).
  7. And when Egil got to know these tidings, he resolved what to do.: "Augljóst er að höfundur Egils sögu hefur viljað láta koma fram að konungur hafi átt Agli svo illa að launa að óhugsandi hefði verið að Egill hefði komið á fund hans af algjörlega frjálsum vilja. En jafnframt kemur skýrt fram að Egill metur meira sæmd sína en líf; það hefði ekki verið líkt honum að láta taka sig til fanga á flótta. Í sögunni er tilviljun og frjálsri ákvörðun fléttað mjög haglega saman, og höfundi er svo mikið í mun að lesendur eða áheyrendur velkist ekki í vafa um afstöðu Egils að hann opnar sýn inn í hug hans með óvenjulegum hætti." Vésteinn Ólason. Jórvíkurför í Egils sögu: Búandmanni telft gegn konungi (p. 53).
  8. ride to the town: "Einn var sá þáttur í fari Egils sem sagan hvað eftir annað bregður á hvössu ljósi – hve hann var fégjarn, féelskur, fésár. Þarf í rauninni meir að segja en að farmurinn hafi bjargast upp á ströndina, til að lesandinn skilji hvers kyns er þegar Egill stofnar lífi sínu í hættu, ríður samstundis upp til Jórvíkur?" Kristján Albertsson. Egill Skallagrímsson í Jórvík (p. 97).
  9. hood drawn over his helm: "Sem úlfsnafn merkir „Hatti“ líklega ‘sá höttótti’, en þegar það er fært yfir á ‘mann-úlf’ gefur það tilefni til merkingarinnar ‘maður með hatt eða hött’." Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir. Primum caput: um höfuð Egils Skalla-Grímssonar (p. 79).
  10. Thither he rode to the house: " Egil's visit to Jorvik is the high point of his saga. He faces a formidable opponent, and all the reasons he has for not going to him only increase the feeling of the reader or audience that nothing can break the will or the strength of this man, who is really the equal of kings, although he is of an altogether different mould and has ambitions of another kind." Vésteinn Ólason. Jorvik Revisited – With Egil Skalla-Grimsson (p. 74).
  11. big as a giant: "Egill Skallagrímsson er hamrammastur alla mennskra manna, sem Íslendingasögur fornar og nýjar skýra frá. Hann ræður yfir slíkum kynngikrafti líkamlegum og andlegum, að hann verður sigurvegari í hverri raun ... Hann er í senn hrotti og hetja, dólgur og skáld, brennandi í hatri, tryggur í vináttu og heitur í ást til eiginkonu og barna. Þrátt fyrir alla þá kynngi, sem í honum býr yfir, er honum lýst sem svo heilsteyptum manni, að við neyðumst til að taka sögu hans sanna, ef ekki sagnfræðilega sanna, þá sem raunsanna lifandi mynd úr samtíð hans, gerða af höfuðsnillingi." Arnór Sigurjónsson. Trolldómur Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 245).
  12. big as a giant: "Egill is both troll and not troll… Ultimately, Egill’s own troll nature remains obscured by a lack of concrete evidence. Rather, Egill exhibits a troll potentiality that opens the text to the possibility of the occult. Egils saga is deliberately ambiguous and the ultimate truth regarding its hero’s troll-like nature is never completely revealed. The occult must remain both unknown and unknowable." Ármann Jakobsson. Beast and Man: Realism and the Occult (p. 43).
  13. I will be your spokesman: „Aðstaða Egils á sér merkilega hliðstæðu í riti af útlendum toga [Maríu sögu]: „[...] því að það er ofdjörfung sekjum og útlaga manni að biðja sjálfan fyrirgefningar í fyrstu sinni sekt þann er misgert er við, heldur skal hinn seki fá til vin þess er misboðið er að túlka sitt mál, og svo skal eg gera.“ Egill er svo einstaklega heppinn að vinur þess manns sem hann hafði misboðið er einnig vinur Egils sjálfs.“ Hermann Pálsson. Ættarmót með Eglu og öðrum skrám (p. 5).
  14. Then they went in: „Egill hefur ætlað sjer að sigla suður með Englandi, en mætt ofviðri nálægt Humbrumynni og þar brotið skip sitt, komist síðan huldu höfði til Arinbjarnar. Nú segir sagan að Arinbjörn hafi óðara farið með Egils til Eirík konungs, túlkað þar mál hans og látið hann færa Eiríki höfuð sitt, þegið síðan grið til næsta dags, ort drápuna um nóttina og fært hana og flutt konungi um daginn. Þetta mun vera ekki rétt.” Matthías Jochumsson. Enn um Höfuðlausn Egils (p. 47).
  15. Great is this honour: "On the surface this is a diplomatic manoeuvre aimed at flattering the king, but while Egill is actually quite able to live with Eiríkr’s anger, it is perhaps harder for him to bear the anger of his deceased father. [...] Thus the confrontation with the king would symbolically be a confrontation with Skalla-Grímr". Torfi H. Tulinius. An Attempt at Application: Interpreting Egils saga (p. 262).
  16. How wert thou so bold: "Hafi Eiríkur ekki séð það sjálfur að fyrra bragði hefur Arinbjörn vissulega bent honum á hvílík nauðsyn honum – kongungi – væri að sættast við Egil og fá álögunum hrundið. En sóma konungs varð að sjálfsögðu að gæta. Egill varð að færa honum höfuð sitt og taka um fót honum, en flytja honum drápu síðan. Og að sjálfsögðu varð Egill að leika það að hann kæmi af fúsum vilja, óumsamið, en í fullu trausti á drengskap konungs." Pétur Benediktsson. Hvers vegna orti Egill Höfuðlausn? (p. 21).
  17. clasped the foot of the king:„First og fremst getur það ekki verið rjett, að Egill hafi komið af hendingu og á móti vilja sínum til Englands. Í 2. erindi Höfuðlausnar segir hann sjálfur: „Buðumsk hilmir löð,/ þar ák hróðrarkvöð“, eða að konungur (ɔː Eiríkr) hafi boðið sjer heim og að þar eigi hann kvöð til að irkja um hann. Þetta mundi skáldið ekki hafa dirfst að segja frammi firir sjálfum konungi og allri hirð hans, ef það hefði ekki verið satt. Þetta kemur heim við vísu þá, sem sagan segir að Egill hafi ort, er hann kom á fund konungs og tók fót honum.“ Björn M. Ólsen. Kvæði Egils Skallagrímssonar gegn Egils sögu (p. 90).
  18. Why shall not Egil be slain: "Ræða Gunnhildar er um svipað efni og hinar tvær ræðurnar: upptalning saka á hendur óvini og krafa um að láta hann fá makleg málagjöld. [...] Ræða Gunnhildar er örstutt, efnið kemur í fáum setningum, algerlega umbúðarlaust. Hún er því gerólík hinni löngu og sléttorðu ræðu Háreks, og eru þó báðar samdar af sama manni. Öðru máli gegnir um samanburð við ræðu Sigurðar biskups." Haraldur Matthíasson. Þrjár ræður (pp. 96-97).
  19. a king was thus dealt with: "Gunnhildur sér hér ekki einstakling standa gegn einstaklingi, heldur ótiginn mann gegn konungsmanni. Eiríkur hefur enga leiðandi hugsjón að miða við. En Gunnhildur er það þroskaðri, að hún mælir allt á kvarða slíkrar hugsjónar". Sigurður Nordal. Gunnhildur konungamóðir (pp. 153-54).
  20. Bragi my kinsman: "Í ummælum Arinbjarnar hersis um Braga ... virðist enn vera stuðzt við Skáldatal, sem telur Braga skáld Bjarnar (Svíakonungs) að Haugi og segir um Erp lútanda: „Hann orti drápu - - ok þar höfuð sitt fyrir"." Sigurður Nordal. Egils saga og Skáldatal (p. 183).
  21. I shall try: “Egill’s travels to and encounters with royalty are of course even more disruptive of the pattern. The best example is doubtless the head-ransom episode in York. Instead of planning to visit the king, perhaps to present a drápa, Egill is driven to him by shipwreck and only composes the poem at the very last minute. Instead of being taken into the hirð, he is cast out of the land pardon-less, with his life alone as the reward for passing the implicit test.’” Lindow, John. Skald Sagas in their Literary Context (p. 226)
  22. a shape witch-posses: " "In the loft scene in York, there is no allusion to Queen Gunnhildr or her enmity, no comment but Egill’s on the presence of the swallow, no description of the shape-shifter (hamhleypa, “one going in [another] form”), whose equation with the bird is only to be inferred or may represent Arinbjǫrn’s conclusion. […] On the other hand, as this and other sagas reveal, Gunnhildr is an adept of sorcery, perhaps as a consequence of early years among the Sámi, and, indeed, Egill’s presence in York is attributed in the saga to magical compulsion on her part. Thus Gunnhildr is a most plausible candidate for the prime mover behind the twittering swallow, a deduction well within the saga conventions" Sayers, William. Verbal Expedients and Transformative Utterances in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (p. 162).
  23. got it so by heart: "Clearly, this oral composition was far from improvised! It may of course be objected that Egil’s poem was skaldic, not Eddic, and consequently more difficult to compose from a technical point of view. Nevertheless, the burden of proof must surely rest with anyone wishing to claim that any longer Norse poem, as we now know it, was based on an improvised performance.“ Lönnroth, Lars. Hjálmar’s Death-Song and the Delivery of Eddic Poetry (p. 3).
  24. he could recite it: "þess er getið í sögunum, sumum, að menn hafi rist rúnar á kefli. Ennfremur er komist svo að orði um Höfuðlausn Egils, að hann hafi „fest“ hana„ svá, at hann mátti kveða um morgininn“. Það er erfitt að skilja þessi orð á annan veg, en þann, að Egill hafi, til öryggis minninu, einnig hripað hana með rúnum“. Eiríkur Kjerulf. Í nátttrölla höndum (p. 4).

Kafli 61

Englandsferð Egils[1]

Eiríkur konungur réð einn vetur fyrir Noregi eftir andlát föður síns Haralds konungs áður Hákon Aðalsteinsfóstri, annar son Haralds konungs, kom til Noregs vestan af Englandi og það sama sumar fór Egill Skalla-Grímsson til Íslands. Hákon fór norður til Þrándheims. Var hann þar til konungs tekinn. Voru þeir Eiríkur um veturinn báðir konungar í Noregi. En eftir um vorið dró hvortveggi her saman. Varð Hákon miklu fjölmennri. Sá Eiríkur þá engan sinn kost annan en flýja land. Fór hann þá á brott með Gunnhildi konu sína og börn þeirra.

Arinbjörn hersir var fóstbróðir Eiríks konungs og barnfóstri hans. Hann var kærastur konungi af öllum lendum mönnum. Hafði konungur sett hann höfðingja yfir allt Firðafylki. Arinbjörn var úr landi með konungi, fóru fyrst vestur um haf til Orkneyja. Þá gifti hann Ragnhildi dóttur sína[2] Arnfinni jarli. [3] Síðan fór hann með liði sínu suður fyrir Skotland og herjaði þar. Þaðan fór hann suður til Englands og herjaði þar.

Og er Aðalsteinn konungur spurði það safnaði hann liði og fór í mót Eiríki. Og er þeir hittust voru borin sáttmál milli þeirra og var það að sættum að Aðalsteinn konungur fékk Eiríki til forráða Norðimbraland en hann skyldi vera landvarnarmaður Aðalsteins konungs fyrir Skotum og Írum. Aðalsteinn konungur hafði skattgilt undir sig Skotland eftir fall Ólafs konungs en þó var það fólk jafnan ótrútt honum.

Svo er sagt[4] að Gunnhildur lét seið efla og lét það seiða að Egill Skalla-Grímsson skyldi aldrei ró bíða á Íslandi fyrr en hún sæi hann. En það sumar er þeir Hákon og Eiríkur höfðu hist og deilt um Noreg þá var farbann til allra landa úr Noregi og komu það sumar engi skip til Íslands og engi tíðindi úr Noregi.

Egill Skalla-Grímsson sat að búi sínu. En þann vetur annan er hann bjó að Borg eftir andlát Skalla-Gríms þá gerðist Egill ókátur og var því meiri ógleði hans er meir leið á veturinn. Og er sumar kom þá lýsti Egill yfir því að hann ætlar að búa skip sitt til brottfarar um sumarið. Tók hann þá háseta. Hann ætlar þá að sigla til Englands.[5] Þeir voru á skipi þrír tigir manna. Ásgerður var þá eftir og gætti bús þeirra en Egill ætlaði þá að fara á fund Aðalsteins konungs og vitja heita þeirra er hann hafði heitið Agli að skilnaði þeirra.

Egill varð ekki snemmbúinn og er hann lét í haf þá byrjaði heldur seint, tók að hausta og stærði veðrin. Sigldu þeir fyrir norðan Orkneyjar. Vildi Egill þar ekki við koma því að hann hugði að ríki Eiríks konungs mundi allt yfir standa í eyjunum. Sigldu þeir þá suður fyrir Skotland og höfðu storm mikinn og veður þvert. Fengu þeir beitt fyrir Skotland og svo norðan fyrir England. En aftan dags er myrkva tók var veður hvasst. Finna þeir eigi fyrr en grunnföll voru á útborða og svo fram fyrir. Var þá engi annar til en stefna á land upp og svo gerðu þeir, sigldu þá til brots og komu að landi við Humrumynni. Þá héldust menn allir og mestur hluti fjár annað en skip. Það brotnaði í spón.

Og er þeir hittu menn að máli spurðu þeir þau tíðindi er Agli þóttu háskasamleg að Eiríkur konungur blóðex var þar fyrir og Gunnhildur og þau höfðu þar ríki til forráða og hann var skammt þaðan uppi í borginni Jórvík.[6] Það spurði hann og að Arinbjörn hersir var þar með konungi og í miklum kærleik við konunginn.

Og er Egill var vís orðinn þessa tíðinda þá gerði hann ráð sitt.[7] Þótti honum sér óvænt til undankomu þótt hann freistaði þess að leynast og fara huldu höfði leið svo langa sem vera mundi áður hann kæmi úr ríki Eiríks konungs. Var hann þá auðkenndur þeim er hann sæju. Þótti honum það lítilmannlegt að vera tekinn í flótta þeim. Herti hann þá huginn og réð það af að þegar um nóttina er þeir höfðu þar komið þá fær hann sér hest og ríður þegar til borgarinnar.[8] Hann hafði síðan hatt yfir hjálmi[9] og alvæpni hafði hann. og alvæpni hafði hann.

Egill spurði hvar garður sá væri í borginni er Arinbjörn átti. Honum var það sagt. Hann reið þangað í garðinn.[10] En er hann kom að stofunni steig hann af hesti sínum og hitti mann að máli. Var honum þá sagt að Arinbjörn sat yfir matborði.

Egill mælti: „Eg vildi góður drengur að þú gengir inn í stofuna og spyr Arinbjörn hvort hann vill heldur úti eða inni tala við Egil Skalla-Grímsson.“

Sá maður segir: „Það er mér lítið starf að reka þetta erindi.“

Hann gekk inn í stofuna og mælti stundarhátt: „Maður er hér kominn úti fyrir dyrum,“ segir hann, „mikill sem tröll.[11][12] En sá bað mig ganga inn og spyrja hvort þú vildir úti eða inni tala við Egil Skalla-Grímsson.“

Arinbjörn segir: „Gakk og bið hann bíða úti og mun hann eigi lengi þurfa.“

Hann gerði sem Arinbjörn mælti, gekk út og sagði sem mælt var við hann.

Arinbjörn bað taka upp borðin. Síðan gekk hann út og allir húskarlar hans með honum. Og er Arinbjörn hitti Egil heilsaði hann honum og spurði hví hann var þar kominn.

Egill segir í fám orðum hið ljósasta af um ferð sína „en nú skaltu fyrir sjá hvert ráð eg skal taka ef þú vilt nokkurt lið veita mér.“

„Hefir þú nokkura menn hitt í borginni,“ segir Arinbjörn, „þá er þig munu kennt hafa áður þú komst hér í garðinn?“

„Engi,“ segir Egill.

„Taki menn þá vopn sín,“ segir Arinbjörn.

Þeir gerðu svo. Og er þeir voru vopnaðir og allir húskarlar Arinbjarnar þá gekk hann í konungsgarð.[13] En er þeir komu til hallar þá klappaði Arinbjörn á dyrum og bað upp láta og segir hver þar var. Dyrverðir létu þegar upp hurðina. Konungur sat yfir borðum.

Arinbjörn bað þá ganga inn tólf menn, nefndi til þess Egil og tíu menn aðra. „Nú skaltu Egill færa Eiríki konungi höfuð þitt og taka um fót honum en eg mun túlka mál þitt.“[14]

Síðan ganga þeir inn. Gekk Arinbjörn fyrir konung og kvaddi hann. Konungur fagnaði honum og spurði hvað er hann vildi.

Arinbjörn mælti: „Eg fylgi hingað þeim manni er kominn er um langan veg að sækja yður heim og sættast við yður. Er yður það vegur mikill herra[15] er óvinir yðrir fara sjálfviljandi af öðrum löndum og þykjast eigi mega bera reiði yðra þó að þér séuð hvergi nær. Láttu þér nú verða höfðinglega við þenna mann. Lát hann fá af sætt góða fyrir það er hann hefir gert veg þinn svo mikinn sem nú má sjá, farið yfir mörg höf og torleiði heiman frá búum sínum. Bar honum enga nauðsyn til þessar farar nema góðvilji við yður.“

Þá litaðist konungur um og sá hann fyrir ofan höfuð mönnum hvar Egill stóð og hvessti augun á hann og mælti: „Hví varstu svo djarfur[16] Egill að þú þorðir að fara á fund minn? Leystist þú svo héðan næstum að þér var engi von lífs af mér.“

Þá gekk Egill að borðinu og tók um fót konungi.[17] Hann kvað þá:

Kominn er eg á jó Íva
angrbeittan veg langan
öldu enskrar foldar
aðsitjanda að vitja.
Nú hefir sískelfir sjálfan
snarþátt Haralds áttar
viðr ofrhuga yfrinn
undar bliks of fundinn.

Eiríkur konungur sagði: „Ekki þarf eg að telja upp sakir á hendur þér en þó eru þær svo margar og stórar að ein hver má vel endast til að þú komir aldrei héðan lífs. Áttu engis annars af von en þú munt hér deyja skulu. Máttir þú það vita áður að þú mundir enga sætt af mér fá.“

Gunnhildur mælti: „Hví skal eigi þegar drepa Egil[18] eða manstu eigi nú konungur hvað Egill hefir gert, drepið vini þína og frændur og þar á ofan son þinn en nítt sjálfan þig. Eða hvar viti menn slíku bellt við konungmann[19]?“

Arinbjörn segir: „Ef Egill hefir mælt illa til konungs þá má hann það bæta í lofsorðum þeim er allan aldur megi uppi vera.“

Gunnhildur mælti: „Vér viljum ekki lof hans heyra. Láttu konungur leiða Egil út og höggva hann. Vil eg eigi heyra orð hans og eigi sjá hann.“

Þá mælti Arinbjörn: „Eigi mun konungur láta að eggjast um öll níðingsverk þín. Eigi mun hann láta Egil drepa í nótt því að náttvíg eru morðvíg.“

Konungur segir: „Svo skal vera Arinbjörn sem þú biður að Egill skal lifa í nótt. Hafðu hann heim með þér og fær mér hann á morgun.“

Arinbjörn þakkaði konungi orð sín. „Væntum vér herra að héðan af muni skipast mál Egils á betri leið. En þó að Egill hafi stórt til saka gert við yður þá lítið þér á það að hann hefir mikils misst fyrir yðrum frændum. Haraldur konungur faðir þinn tók af lífi ágætan mann, Þórólf föðurbróður hans, af rógi manna en af engum sökum. En þér konungur brutuð lög á Agli fyrir sakir Berg-Önundar, en þar á ofan vilduð þér hafa Egil að dauðamanni og drápuð menn af honum en rænduð hann fé öllu, og þar á ofan gerðuð þér hann útlaga og rákuð hann af landi, en Egill er engi ertingamaður. En hvert mál er maður skal dæma verður að líta á tilgerðir. Eg mun nú,“ segir Arinbjörn, „hafa Egil með mér í nótt heim í garð minn.“

Var nú svo. Og er þeir komu í garðinn þá ganga þeir tveir í loft nokkurt lítið og ræða um þetta mál. Segir Arinbjörn svo: „Allreiður var konungur nú en heldur þótti mér mýkjast skaplyndi hans nokkuð áður létti og mun nú hamingja skipta hvað upp kemur. Veit eg að Gunnhildur mun allan hug á leggja að spilla þínu máli. Nú vil eg það ráð gefa að þú vakir í nótt og yrkir lofkvæði um Eirík konung. Þætti mér þá vel ef það yrði drápa tvítug og mættir þú kveða á morgun er við komum fyrir konung. Svo gerði Bragi frændi minn[20] þá er hann varð fyrir reiði Bjarnar Svíakonungs að hann orti drápu tvítuga um hann eina nótt og þá þar fyrir höfuð sitt. Nú mætti vera að vér bærum gæfu til við konung svo að þér kæmi það í frið við konung.“

Egill segir: „Freista skal [21]eg þessa ráðs er þú vilt en ekki hefi eg við því búist að yrkja lof um Eirík konung.“

Arinbjörn bað hann freista. Síðan gekk hann á brott til manna sinna. Sátu þeir að drykkju til miðrar nætur. Þá gekk Arinbjörn til svefnhúss og sveit hans og áður hann afklæddist gekk hann upp í loftið til Egils og spurði hvað þá liði um kvæðið.

Egill segir að ekki var ort „hefir hér setið svala ein við glugginn og klakað í alla nótt svo að eg hefi aldrei beðið ró fyrir.“

Síðan gekk Arinbjörn á brott og út um dyr þær er ganga mátti upp á húsið og settist við glugg þann á loftinu er fuglinn hafði áður við setið. Hann sá hvar hamhleypa nokkur[22] fór annan veg af húsinu. Arinbjörn sat þar við glugginn alla nóttina til þess er lýsti. En síðan er Arinbjörn hafði þar komið þá orti Egill alla drápuna og hafði fest svo[23] að hann mátti kveða[24] um morguninn þá er hann hitti Arinbjörn. Þeir héldu vörð á nær tími mundi vera að hitta konung.

Tilvísanir

  1. Englandsferð Egils: "Mellom Egils besøk I England hos kong Erik blodøks (kap. 59) og Skallagrims ferd til kong Harald for å be om bøter for Torolv (kap. 25) fins det ikke mindre enn 7 likhedspunkter. 1) Skallagrim kommer með 11 mann; de er altså 12 I alt: Arinbjørn bad 12 mann gå inn til kong Erik. 2)Skallagrim har talsmann hos kongen, Olve Nuva: Egil har en talsmann hos Kongen, Arinbjørn herse. 3) Ved ankomsten spør Grim og hans menn etter tidender: Ved ankomsten får Egil og hans menn høre visse tidender. 4) Grim sender bud til Olve for å få tale med ham: Egil sender bud til Arinbjørn for å få tale med ham. 5) Olve går fram til kongen, og Skallagrim står bak ham: Arinbjørn går fram til kongen, og Egil følger etter ham. 6) Olve legger inn et godt ord for Grim: Arinbjørnlegger inn et godt ord for Egil. 7)Kongen ser en man bak Olve some r et hode høyere enn andre men og skallet: Erik blodøks ser over hodene til de andre mennene hvis Egil står. " Jakobsen, Alfred. Om parallellepisoder i Egils saga (s. 316).
  2. gifti hann Ragnhildi dóttur sína: "While I can imagine the author of Egils saga or the Separate Saga of St. Óláfr revising his earlier ideas as he worked out the chronology of Haraldr gráfeldr’s life and placing Ragnhildr’s marriage as late as possible, I cannot imagine the author of Heimskringla jettisoning his carefully worked-out chronology for a simplifi ed one that made the age problem even worse. In any case, Egils saga’s account of Eiríkr’s movements agrees not with Heimskringla but with the Separate Saga of St. Óláfr, which scholars agree preceded Heimskringla." Cormack, Margaret. Heimskringla, Egils saga, and the Daughter of Eiríkr blóðøx (s. 66).
  3. gifti hann Ragnhildi dóttur sína Arnfinni jarli.: "Það er auðsjáanlega skakt í Eg. [ils sögu] (59 k., 62 k.), að Eiríkr hafi gipt Arnfinni Jarli í Orkneyjum Regnhildi dóttur sína, þegar er hann kom til eyjanna eptir flóttann frá Noregi, því að þá hefði hún hlotið að vera barn að aldri, og er hitt miklu eðlilegra og sjálfsagt nær hinu sanna, sem segir í Hkr., að Gunnhildur og synir hennar hafi gipt hana löngu síðar, áður en þau fóru til Danmerkur frá Orkneyjum" Jón Jónsson. Um Eirík blóðöx (s. 190).
  4. Svo er sagt : " höfundar Íslendingasagna voru ekki safnarar og skrifarar munnmæla heldur skáld og skapandi rithöfundar. Í sumum (jafnvel flestum) Íslendingasögum er beinlínis vitnað til munnmæla með orðum eins og „svo er sagt“, „sumir segja“ o.fl. því líkt. En vitanlega kann í sumum tilfellum vera um að ræða listabragð: „Svo er sagt að Gunnhildur lét seið efla...“ [...] Með slíkum orðum svarar söguhöfundur fyrir fram þeim sem kunni að vefengja frásögina." Bjarni Einarsson. Íslendingadrápa (s. 130).
  5. Hann ætlar þá að sigla til Englands.: " Jórvíkurfrásögnin af Agli við hirð Eiríks blóðaxar og Gunnhildar og frásagan af höfuðlausn Óttars svarta eru um margt líkar þó vissulega séu sakarefni fleiri í Egils sögu. Í báðum tilvikum er konungur reiður skáldi fyrir kveðskap. Skáldið er í vörslu. Háttsettur konungsmaður ráðleggur skáldinu að yrkja drápurá ákveðnum tíma (þremur nóttum/ einni nóttu). Konungsmaður vitjar skáldsins um nótt. Við hirðina eru ákveðnir aðilar lítt hliðhollir skáldi en konungsmaðurinn heldur uppi vörnum. Drottning er viðstödd enda tengist hún atburðum (hún er ekki sjáanleg í eldri frásögnum af Óttari) og konungshjónin eru ekki sammála um afdrif skáldsins. Konungur lætur skáldið þiggja höfuð sitt „ í þessu sinni“ / „ að sinni“ fyrir drápuna og skáldið segir að höfuð sitt sé ljótt. Kvæðið heitir Höfuðlausn. " Baldur Hafstað. Sighvatur Þórðarsson og Egils saga (s. 111).
  6. í borginni Jórvík: „Dass sich im einzelnen nun die vorgänge am königshofe zu York unmöglich so abgespielt haben konnten, wie sie die Eigla in den langen reden und verhandlungen Arinsbjörns mit dem könige Erich und dessen gemahlin Gunnhild schildert, ist schon von andern forschern hervorgehoben.“ Niedner, Felix. Egils Hauptlösung (s. 108).
  7. Og er Egill var vís orðinn þessa tíðinda þá gerði hann ráð sitt.: "Augljóst er að höfundur Egils sögu hefur viljað láta koma fram að konungur hafi átt Agli svo illa að launa að óhugsandi hefði verið að Egill hefði komið á fund hans af algjörlega frjálsum vilja. En jafnframt kemur skýrt fram að Egill metur meira sæmd sína en líf; það hefði ekki verið líkt honum að láta taka sig til fanga á flótta. Í sögunni er tilviljun og frjálsri ákvörðun fléttað mjög haglega saman, og höfundi er svo mikið í mun að lesendur eða áheyrendur velkist ekki í vafa um afstöðu Egils að hann opnar sýn inn í hug hans með óvenjulegum hætti." Vésteinn Ólason. Jórvíkurför í Egils sögu: Búandmanni telft gegn konungi (s. 53).
  8. ríður þegar til borgarinnar: "Einn var sá þáttur í fari Egils sem sagan hvað eftir annað bregður á hvössu ljósi – hve hann var fégjarn, féelskur, fésár. Þarf í rauninni meir að segja en að farmurinn hafi bjargast upp á ströndina, til að lesandinn skilji hvers kyns er þegar Egill stofnar lífi sínu í hættu, ríður samstundis upp til Jórvíkur?" Kristján Albertsson. Egill Skallagrímsson í Jórvík (p. 97).
  9. hatt yfir hjálmi: "Sem úlfsnafn merkir „Hatti“ líklega ‘sá höttótti’, en þegar það er fært yfir á ‘mann-úlf’ gefur það tilefni til merkingarinnar ‘maður með hatt eða hött’." Bergljót Soffía Kristjánsdóttir. Primum caput: um höfuð Egils Skalla-Grímssonar (s. 79).
  10. Hann reið þangað í garðinn: " Egil's visit to Jorvik is the high point of his saga. He faces a formidable opponent, and all the reasons he has for not going to him only increase the feeling of the reader or audience that nothing can break the will or the strength of this man, who is really the equal of kings, although he is of an altogether different mould and has ambitions of another kind." Vésteinn Ólason. Jorvik Revisited – With Egil Skalla-Grimsson (s. 74).
  11. mikill sem tröll: "Egill Skallagrímsson er hamrammastur alla mennskra manna, sem Íslendingasögur fornar og nýjar skýra frá. Hann ræður yfir slíkum kynngikrafti líkamlegum og andlegum, að hann verður sigurvegari í hverri raun ... Hann er í senn hrotti og hetja, dólgur og skáld, brennandi í hatri, tryggur í vináttu og heitur í ást til eiginkonu og barna. Þrátt fyrir alla þá kynngi, sem í honum býr yfir, er honum lýst sem svo heilsteyptum manni, að við neyðumst til að taka sögu hans sanna, ef ekki sagnfræðilega sanna, þá sem raunsanna lifandi mynd úr samtíð hans, gerða af höfuðsnillingi." Arnór Sigurjónsson. Trolldómur Egils Skallagrímssonar (p. 245).
  12. mikill sem tröll: "Egill is both troll and not troll… Ultimately, Egill’s own troll nature remains obscured by a lack of concrete evidence. Rather, Egill exhibits a troll potentiality that opens the text to the possibility of the occult. Egils saga is deliberately ambiguous and the ultimate truth regarding its hero’s troll-like nature is never completely revealed. The occult must remain both unknown and unknowable." Ármann Jakobsson. Beast and Man: Realism and the Occult (p. 43).
  13. þá gekk hann í konungsgarð: „Egill hefur ætlað sjer að sigla suður með Englandi, en mætt ofviðri nálægt Humbrumynni og þar brotið skip sitt, komist síðan huldu höfði til Arinbjarnar. Nú segir sagan að Arinbjörn hafi óðara farið með Egils til Eirík konungs, túlkað þar mál hans og látið hann færa Eiríki höfuð sitt, þegið síðan grið til næsta dags, ort drápuna um nóttina og fært hana og flutt konungi um daginn. Þetta mun vera ekki rétt.” Matthías Jochumsson. Enn um Höfuðlausn Egils (s. 47).
  14. eg mun túlka mál þitt: „Aðstaða Egils á sér merkilega hliðstæðu í riti af útlendum toga [Maríu sögu]: „[...] því að það er ofdjörfung sekjum og útlaga manni að biðja sjálfan fyrirgefningar í fyrstu sinni sekt þann er misgert er við, heldur skal hinn seki fá til vin þess er misboðið er að túlka sitt mál, og svo skal eg gera.“ Egill er svo einstaklega heppinn að vinur þess manns sem hann hafði misboðið er einnig vinur Egils sjálfs.“ Hermann Pálsson. Ættarmót með Eglu og öðrum skrám (s. 5).
  15. vegur mikill herra: "On the surface this is a diplomatic manoeuvre aimed at flattering the king, but while Egill is actually quite able to live with Eiríkr’s anger, it is perhaps harder for him to bear the anger of his deceased father. [...] Thus the confrontation with the king would symbolically be a confrontation with Skalla-Grímr". Torfi H. Tulinius. An Attempt at Application: Interpreting Egils saga (s. 262).
  16. Hví varstu svo djarfur: "Hafi Eiríkur ekki séð það sjálfur að fyrra bragði hefur Arinbjörn vissulega bent honum á hvílík nauðsyn honum – kongungi – væri að sættast við Egil og fá álögunum hrundið. En sóma konungs varð að sjálfsögðu að gæta. Egill varð að færa honum höfuð sitt og taka um fót honum, en flytja honum drápu síðan. Og að sjálfsögðu varð Egill að leika það að hann kæmi af fúsum vilja, óumsamið, en í fullu trausti á drengskap konungs." Pétur Benediktsson. Hvers vegna orti Egill Höfuðlausn? (s. 21).
  17. tók um fót konungi:„First og fremst getur það ekki verið rjett, að Egill hafi komið af hendingu og á móti vilja sínum til Englands. Í 2. erindi Höfuðlausnar segir hann sjálfur: „Buðumsk hilmir löð,/ þar ák hróðrarkvöð“, eða að konungur (ɔː Eiríkr) hafi boðið sjer heim og að þar eigi hann kvöð til að irkja um hann. Þetta mundi skáldið ekki hafa dirfst að segja frammi firir sjálfum konungi og allri hirð hans, ef það hefði ekki verið satt. Þetta kemur heim við vísu þá, sem sagan segir að Egill hafi ort, er hann kom á fund konungs og tók fót honum.“ Björn M. Ólsen. Kvæði Egils Skallagrímssonar gegn Egils sögu (s. 90).
  18. Hví skal eigi þegar drepa Egil: "Ræða Gunnhildar er um svipað efni og hinar tvær ræðurnar: upptalning saka á hendur óvini og krafa um að láta hann fá makleg málagjöld. [...] Ræða Gunnhildar er örstutt, efnið kemur í fáum setningum, algerlega umbúðarlaust. Hún er því gerólík hinni löngu og sléttorðu ræðu Háreks, og eru þó báðar samdar af sama manni. Öðru máli gegnir um samanburð við ræðu Sigurðar biskups." Haraldur Matthíasson. Þrjár ræður (s. 96-97).
  19. slíku bellt við konungmann: „Gunnhildur sér hér ekki einstakling standa gegn einstaklingi, heldur ótiginn mann gegn konungsmanni. Eiríkur hefur enga leiðandi hugsjón að miða við. En Gunnhildur er það þroskaðri, að hún mælir allt á kvarða slíkrar hugsjónar”. Sigurður Nordal. Gunnhildur konungamóðir (s. 153-54).
  20. Bragi frændi minn: "Í ummælum Arinbjarnar hersis um Braga ... virðist enn vera stuðzt við Skáldatal, sem telur Braga skáld Bjarnar (Svíakonungs) að Haugi og segir um Erp lútanda: „Hann orti drápu - - ok þar höfuð sitt fyrir"." Sigurður Nordal. Egils saga og Skáldatal (s. 183).
  21. Freista skal: “Egill’s travels to and encounters with royalty are of course even more disruptive of the pattern. The best example is doubtless the head-ransom episode in York. Instead of planning to visit the king, perhaps to present a drápa, Egill is driven to him by shipwreck and only composes the poem at the very last minute. Instead of being taken into the hirð, he is cast out of the land pardon-less, with his life alone as the reward for passing the implicit test.’” Lindow, John. Skald Sagas in their Literary Context (p. 226)
  22. hamhleypa nokkur: " "In the loft scene in York, there is no allusion to Queen Gunnhildr or her enmity, no comment but Egill’s on the presence of the swallow, no description of the shape-shifter (hamhleypa, “one going in [another] form”), whose equation with the bird is only to be inferred or may represent Arinbjǫrn’s conclusion. […] On the other hand, as this and other sagas reveal, Gunnhildr is an adept of sorcery, perhaps as a consequence of early years among the Sámi, and, indeed, Egill’s presence in York is attributed in the saga to magical compulsion on her part. Thus Gunnhildr is a most plausible candidate for the prime mover behind the twittering swallow, a deduction well within the saga conventions" Sayers, William. Verbal Expedients and Transformative Utterances in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (s. 162).
  23. hafði fest svo: "Clearly, this oral composition was far from improvised! It may of course be objected that Egil’s poem was skaldic, not Eddic, and consequently more difficult to compose from a technical point of view. Nevertheless, the burden of proof must surely rest with anyone wishing to claim that any longer Norse poem, as we now know it, was based on an improvised performance.“ Lönnroth, Lars. Hjálmar’s Death-Song and the Delivery of Eddic Poetry (s. 3).
  24. hann mátti kveða: "þess er getið í sögunum, sumum, að menn hafi rist rúnar á kefli. Ennfremur er komist svo að orði um Höfuðlausn Egils, að hann hafi „fest“ hana„ svá, at hann mátti kveða um morgininn“. Það er erfitt að skilja þessi orð á annan veg, en þann, að Egill hafi, til öryggis minninu, einnig hripað hana með rúnum“. Eiríkur Kjerulf. Í nátttrölla höndum (s. 4).

Links

Personal tools