Njála, 097

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 97

Now we must take up the story, and say that Njal spoke thus to Hauskuld, his foster-son, and said, "I would seek thee a match."

Hauskuld bade him settle the matter as he pleased, and asked whether he was most likely to turn his eyes.

"There is a woman called Hildigunna," answers Njal, "and she is the daughter of Starkad, the son of Thord Freyspriest. She is the best match I know of."

"See thou to it, foster-father," said Hauskuld; "that shall be my choice which thou choosest."

"Then we will look thitherward," says Njal.

A little while after, Njal called on men to go along with him. Then the sons of Sigfus, and Njal's sons, and Kari Solmund's son, all of them fared with him and they rode east to Swinefell.

There they got a hearty welcome.

The day after, Njal and Flosi went to talk alone, and the speech of Njal ended thus, that he said, "This is my errand here, that we have set out on a wooing-journey, to ask for thy kinswoman Hildigunna."

"At whose hand?" says Flosi.

"At the hand of Hauskuld, my foster-son," says Njal.

"Such things are well meant," says Flosi, "but still ye run each of you great risk, the one from the other; but what hast thou to say of Hauskuld?"

"Good I am able to say of him," says Njal; "and besides, I will lay down as much money as will seem fitting to thy niece and thyself, if thou wilt think of making this match.

"We will call her hither," says Flosi, "and know how she looks on the man."

Then Hildigunna was called, and she came thither.

Flosi told her of the wooing, but she said she was a proudhearted woman.

"And I know not how things will turn out between me and men of like spirit; but this, too, is not the least of my dislike, that this man has no priesthood or leadership over men, but thou hast always said that thou wouldest not wed me to a man who had not the priesthood."

"This is quite enough," says Flosi, "if thou wilt not be wedded to Hauskuld, to make me take no more pains about the match."

"Nay! " she says, "I do not say that I will not be wedded to Hauskuld if they can get him a priesthood or a leadership over men; but otherwise I will have nothing to say to the match."

"Then," said Njal, "I will beg thee to let this match stand over for three winters, that I may see what I can do."

Flosi said that so it should be.

"I will only bargain for this one thing," says Hildigunna, "if this match comes to pass, that we shall stay here away east."

Njal said he would rather leave that to Hauskuld, but Hauskuld said that he put faith in many men, but in none so much as his foster-father.

Now they ride from the east.

Njal sought to get a priesthood and leadership for Hauskuld, but no one was willing to sell his priesthood, and now the summer passes away till the Althing.

There were great quarrels at the Thing that summer, and many a man then did as was their wont, in faring to see Njal; but he gave such counsel in men's lawsuits as was not thought at all likely, so that both the pleadings and the defence came to naught, and out of that great strife arose, when the lawsuits could not be brought to an end, and men rode home from the Thing unatoned.

Now things go on till another Thing comes. Njal rode to the Thing, and at first all is quiet until Njal says that it is high time for men to give notice of their suits.

Then many said that they thought that came to little, when no man could get his suit settled, even though the witnesses were summoned to the Althing, "and so," say they, "we would rather seek our rights with point and edge."

"So it must not be," says Njal, "for it will never do to have no law in the land. But yet ye have much to say on your side in this matter, and it behoves us who know the law, and who are bound to guide the law, to set men at one again, and to ensue peace. 'Twere good counsel, then, methinks, that we call together all the chiefs and talk the matter over."

Then they go to the Court of Laws, and Njal spoke and said, "Thee, Skapti Thorod's son and you other chiefs, I call on, and say, that methinks our lawsuits have come into a dead lock, if we have to follow up our suits in the Quarter Courts, and they get so entangled that they can neither be pleaded nor ended. Methinks, it were wiser if we had a Fifth Court, and there pleaded those suits which cannot be brought to an end in the Quarter Courts."

"How," said Skapti, "wilt thou name a Fifth Court, when the Quarter Court is named for the old priesthoods, three twelves in each quarter?"

"I can see help for that," says Njal, "by setting up new priesthoods, and filling them with the men who are best fitted in each Quarter, and then let those men who are willing to agree to it, declare themselves ready to join the new priest's Thing."

"Well," says Skapti, "we will take this choice; but what weighty suits shall come before the court?"

"These matters shall come before it," says Njal,--"all matters of contempt of the Thing, such as if men bear false witness, or utter a false finding; hither, too, shall come all those suits in which the judges are divided in opinion in the Quarter Court; then they shall be summoned to the Fifth Court; so, too, if men offer bribes, or take them, for their help in suits. In this court all the oaths shall be of the strongest kind, and two men shall follow every oath, who shall support on their words of honour what the others swear. So it shall be also, if the pleadings on one side are right in form, and the other wrong, that the judgment shall be given for those that are right in form. Every suit in this court shall be pleaded just as is now done in the Quarter Court, save and except that when four twelves are named in the Fifth Court, then the plaintiff shall name and set aside six men out of the court, and the defendant other six; but if he will not set them aside, then the plaintiff shall name them and set them aside as he has done with his own six; but if the plaintiff does not set them aside, then the suit comes to naught, for three twelves shall utter judgment on all suits. We shall also have this arrangement in the Court of Laws, that those only shall have the right to make or change laws who sit on the middle bench, and to this bench those only shall be chosen who are wisest and best. There, too, shall the Fifth Court sit; but if those who sit in the Court of Laws are not agreed as to what they shall allow or bring in as law, then they shall clear the court for a division, and the majority shall bind the rest; but if any man who has a seat in the Court be outside the Court of Laws and cannot get inside it, or thinks himself overborne in the suit, then he shall forbid them by a protest, so that they can hear it in the Court, and then he has made all their grants and all their decisions void and of none effect, and stopped them by his protest."

After that, Skapti Thorod's son brought the Fifth Court into the law, and all that was spoken of before. Then men went to the Hill of Laws, and men set up new priesthoods:[1] In the Northlanders' Quarter were these new priesthoods. The priesthood of the Melmen in Midfirth, and the Laufesingers' priesthood in the Eyjafirth.

Then Njal begged for a hearing, and spoke thus: "It is known to many men what passed between my sons and the men of Gritwater when they slew Thrain Sigfus' son. But for all that we settled the matter; and now I have taken Hauskuld into my house, and planned a marriage for him if he can get a priesthood anywhere; but no man will sell his priesthood, and so I will beg you to give me leave to set up a new priesthood at Whiteness for Hauskuld."

He got this leave from all,[2] and after that he set up the new priesthood for Hauskuld; and he was afterwards called Hauskuld, the Priest of Whiteness.[3]

After that, men ride home from the Thing, and Njal stayed but a short time at home ere he rides east to Swinefell, and his sons with him, and again stirs in the matter of the marriage with Flosi; but Flosi said he was ready to keep faith with them in everything.

Then Hildigunna was betrothed to Hauskuld, and the day for the wedding feast was fixed, and so the matter ended. They then ride home, but they rode again shortly to the bridal, and Flosi paid down all her goods and money after the wedding, and all went off well.

They fared home to Bergthorsknoll, and were there the next year, and all went well between Hildigunna and Bergthom. But the next spring Njal bought land in Ossaby, and hands it over to Hauskuld, and thither he fares to his own abode. Njal got him all his household, and there was such love between them all, that none of them thought anything that he said or did any worth unless the others had a share in it.

Hauskuld dwelt long at Ossaby, and each backed the other's honour, and Njal's sons were always in Hauskuld's company. Their friendship was so warm, that each house bade the other to a feast every harvest, and gave each other great gifts; and so it goes on for a long while.

References

  1. men set up new priesthoods: "Nú er það einmitt einkenni uppbótargoðorðanna, að handhafar þeirra á alþingi nefna sinn manninn hver til fimmtardómsetu í umboði goðanna, sem áttu þau. Það er því ofureðlilegt, að goðorð þessi hlytu heitið forráðsgoðorð, til aðgreiningar frá öðrum löggoðorðum, sem með réttu mætti kalla sjálfseignargoðorð." Barði Guðmundsson. Goðorð forn og ný (pp. 65–66).
  2. He got this leave from all: "The wise and noble Njal reveals to us a legal system on the point of collapse. Yet Njal does not eschew legalistic tactics. While the reader tends to abide Njal's manipulations, for they serve virtuous ends, the deteriorating system provides similar opportunities to those less benevolent than Njal. The intention of the author may well be to bring precisely this understanding to his public." Ordower, Henry. Exploring the Literary Function of Law and Litigation in "Njal's Saga." (pp. 51-52).
  3. Hauskuld, the Priest of Whiteness: "The author of Njála 's innovative approach to Landnáma is revealed in several ways. With his knowledge of Landnáma and of genealogy, he appears to take names from the first generations of the settlement age, giving them to „invented“ people from the families concerned. Höskuldur Hvítanessgoði is a good example of this practice. He is mentioned nowhere except in Njála." Baldur Hafstað. Egils saga, Njáls saga, and the Shadow of Landnáma (p. 33).

Kafli 97

Nú er þar til máls að taka að Njáll talaði við Höskuld: „Ráðs vildi eg leita og þér kvonfangs.“

Höskuldur bað hann fyrir ráða og spyr hvar hann mundi helst á leita.

Njáll svarar: „Kona heitir Hildigunnur og er Starkaðardóttir Þórðarsonar Freysgoða. Þann veit eg kost bestan.“

Höskuldur mælti: „Sjá þú fyrir, fóstri. Það skal mitt ráð sem þú vilt vera láta.“

„Hér munum við á líta,“ segir Njáll.

Litlu síðar kvaddi Njáll menn til ferðar með sér. Þar fóru Sigfússynir og Njálssynir allir og Kári Sölmundarson. Þeir riðu austur til Svínafells. Fá þeir þar góðar viðtökur.

Um daginn eftir ganga þeir Njáll og Flosi á tal.

Þar koma niður ræður Njáls að hann segir svo: „Það er erindi mitt hingað að vér förum bónorðsför að biðja Hildigunnar frændkonu þinnar.“

„Fyrir hvers hönd?“ segir Flosi.

„Fyrir hönd Höskulds fóstra míns,“ segir Njáll.

„Vel er slíkt stofnað,“ segir Flosi, „en þó hafið þér hættumikið hvorir við aðra eða hvað segir þú frá Höskuldi?“

„Gott má eg frá honum segja,“ segir Njáll, „og skal eg þar til fé leggja svo að yður þyki sæmilega ef þér viljið þetta mál að álitum gera.“

„Kalla munum vér á hana,“ segir Flosi, „og vita hversu henni lítist maður.“

Var þá kallað á Hildigunni og kom hún þangað.

Flosi segir henni bónorðið.

Hún kvaðst vera kona skapstór „og veit eg eigi hversu mér er hent við það er þar eru svo menn fyrir en það þó eigi síður að sjá maður hefir ekki mannaforráð. Og hefir þú það mælt að þú mundir eigi gifta mig goðorðslausum manni.“

„Það er ærið eitt til,“ segir Flosi, „ef þú vilt eigi giftast að þá mun eg engan kost á gera.“

„Það mæli eg eigi,“ segir hún, „að eg vilji eigi giftast Höskuldi ef þeir fá honum mannaforráð. En ellegar mun eg engan kost á gera.“

Njáll mælti: „Þá vil eg bíða láta mín um þetta mál þrjá vetur.“

Flosi svaraði að svo skyldi vera.

„Þann hlut vildi eg til skilja,“ segir Hildigunnur, „ef þessi ráð takast að við værum austur hér.“

Njáll kvaðst það vilja skilja undir Höskuld en Höskuldur kvaðst mörgum vel trúa „en engum jafn vel sem fóstra mínum.“

Nú ríða þeir austan.

Njáll leitaði Höskuldi um mannaforráð og vildi engi selja sitt goðorð.

Líður nú sumarið til alþingis. Þetta sumar voru þingdeildir miklar. Gerði þá margur sem vant var að fara til fundar við Njál en hann lagði það til mála manna sem ekki þótti líklegt að eyddust sóknir og varnir og varð af því þræta mikil er málin máttu eigi lúkast og riðu menn heim af þingi ósáttir.

Líður nú þar til er kemur annað þing. Njáll reið til þings. Og er fyrst kyrrt þingið allt þar til er Njáll talar að mönnum væri mál að lýsa sökum sínum.

Margir mæltu að til lítils þætti það koma er engi kæmi sínu máli fram þó að til þinga væri stefnt „og viljum vér heldur,“ segja þeir, „heimta með oddi og eggju.“

„Svo má eigi vera,“ segir Njáll, „og hlýðir það hvergi að hafa eigi lög í landi. En þó hafið þér mikið til yðvars máls um það og kemur það til vor er lögin kunnum og þeim skulum stýra. Þykir mér það ráð að vér köllumst saman allir höfðingjar og tölum um.“

Þeir gengu þá til lögréttu.

Njáll mælti: „Þig kveð eg að þessu, Skafti Þóroddsson, og aðra höfðingja að mér þykir sem málum vorum sé komið í ónýt efni ef vér skulum sækja mál í fjórðungsdómum og verði svo vafið að eigi megi lyktast né fram ganga. Þykir mér það ráðlegra að vér ættum einn fimmtardóm og sæktum þau mál þar í er eigi mega lyktast í fjórðungsdómi.“

„Skaltu,“ sagði Skafti, „nefna fimmtardóminn, er fyrir forn goðorð er nefndur fjórðungsdómur, þrennar tylftir í fjórðungi hverjum?“

„Sjá mun eg ráð til þess,“ segir Njáll, „að taka upp ný goðorð, þeir er best eru til fallnir úr fjórðungi hverjum, og segist þeir í þing með þeim er það vilja.“

„Samþykkja þenna kost viljum vér,“ segir Skafti, „eða hve vandar sóknir skulu hér vera?“

„Þau mál skulu hér í koma,“ segir Njáll, „um alla þingsafglöpun ef menn bera ljúgvitni og ljúgkviðu. Hér skulu og í koma vefangsmál öll þau er menn vefengja í fjórðungsdómi og skal þeim stefna til fimmtardóms. Svo og ef menn bjóða fé eða taka til liðs sér. Í þessum dómi skulu vera allir hinir styrkjustu eiðar og fylgja tveir hverjum eiði er það skulu leggja undir þegnskap sinn er hinir sverja. Svo skal og ef annar fer með rétt mál en annar með rangt, þá skal eftir þeim dæma er rétt fara að sókn. Hér skal og sækja hvert mál sem í fjórðungsdómi utan það þá er nefndar eru fernar tylftir í fimmtardóm, þá skal sækjandi nefna sex menn úr dómi en verjandi aðra sex menn. En ef hann vill eigi nefna úr þá skal sækjandi nefna þá úr sem hina. En ef sækjandi nefnir eigi þá er ónýtt málið því að þrennar tylftir skulu um dæma. Vér skulum og hafa þá lögréttuskipun að þeir skulu réttir að ráða fyrir lögum er sitja á miðjum pöllum og skal þá velja til þess er vitrastir eru og best að sér. Þar skulu og vera fimm dómendur ef þeir verða eigi á sáttir er í lögréttu sitja hvað þeir vilja lofa eða í lög leiða, þá skulu þeir ryðja lögréttu til og skal ráða afl með þeim. En ef sá er nokkur fyrir utan lögréttu að eigi nái inn að ganga eða þykist borinn vera máli þá skal hann verja lýriti svo að heyri í lögréttu og hefir hann þá ónýtt fyrir þeim öll lof þeirra og allt það er þeir mæltu til lögskila og varði lýriti.“

Eftir það leiddi Skafti í lög fimmtardóm og allt það er upp var talið. Eftir það gengu menn til Lögbergs. Tóku menn þá ný goðorð.[1] Í Norðlendingafjórðungi voru þessi ný goðorð: Melmannagoðorð í Miðfirði og Laufæsingagoðorð í Eyjafirði.

Þá kvaddi Njáll sér hljóðs og mælti: „Það er mörgum mönnum kunnugt hversu fór með sonum mínum og Grjótármönnum er þeir drápu Þráin Sigfússon en þó sættumst vér á málið og hefi eg nú tekið við Höskuldi og ráðið honum kvonfang ef hann fær goðorð nokkuð en engi vill selja sitt goðorð. Vil eg biðja yður að þér lofið mér að taka upp nýtt goðorð á Hvítanesi til handa Höskuldi.“

Hann fékk það af öllum.[2] Síðan tók hann upp goðorð til handa Höskuldi og var hann síðan kallaður Höskuldur Hvítanesgoði.[3]

Eftir ríða menn heim af þingi.

Njáll dvaldist skamma stund heima áður hann ríður austur til Svínafells og synir hans og vekur bónorðið við Flosa en Flosi kvaðst efna mundu við þá. Var þá Hildigunnur föstnuð Höskuldi og kveðið á brúðlaupsstefnu og lýkur svo með þeim. Ríða þeir þá heim.

En í annað sinn riðu þeir til brúðlaups. Leysti Flosi út allt fé hennar eftir boðið og fór það vel af hendi. Fóru þau til Bergþórshvols og voru þau þar hin næstu misseri og fór allt vel með þeim Hildigunni og Bergþóru. En um vorið eftir keypti Njáll land í Ossabæ og fær það Höskuldi og fer hann þangað byggðum sínum. Njáll réð honum hjón öll. Og svo var dátt með þeim öllum að engum þótti ráð ráðið nema hver réðist við annan um. Bjó Höskuldur í Ossabæ lengi svo að hvorir studdu annarra sæmd og voru synir Njáls í ferðum með honum. Svo var ákaft um vináttu þeirra að hvorir buðu öðrum heim hvert haust og gáfu stórgjafir. Fer svo lengi fram.

Tilvísanir

  1. Tóku menn þá ný goðorð: "Nú er það einmitt einkenni uppbótargoðorðanna, að handhafar þeirra á alþingi nefna sinn manninn hver til fimmtardómsetu í umboði goðanna, sem áttu þau. Það er því ofureðlilegt, að goðorð þessi hlytu heitið forráðsgoðorð, til aðgreiningar frá öðrum löggoðorðum, sem með réttu mætti kalla sjálfseignargoðorð." Barði Guðmundsson. Goðorð forn og ný (s. 65–66).
  2. Hann fékk það af öllum: "The wise and noble Njal reveals to us a legal system on the point of collapse. Yet Njal does not eschew legalistic tactics. While the reader tends to abide Njal's manipulations, for they serve virtuous ends, the deteriorating system provides similar opportunities to those less benevolent than Njal. The intention of the author may well be to bring precisely this understanding to his public." Ordower, Henry. Exploring the Literary Function of Law and Litigation in "Njal's Saga." (s. 51-52).
  3. Höskuldur Hvítanesgoði: "The author of Njála 's innovative approach to Landnáma is revealed in several ways. With his knowledge of Landnáma and of genealogy, he appears to take names from the first generations of the settlement age, giving them to „invented“ people from the families concerned. Höskuldur Hvítanessgoði is a good example of this practice. He is mentioned nowhere except in Njála." Baldur Hafstað. Egils saga, Njáls saga, and the Shadow of Landnáma (s. 33).

Links

Personal tools