Njála, 130

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 130

Now it is to be told of Skarphedinn that he runs out on the cross-beam straight after Kari, but when he came to where the beam was most burnt, then it broke down under him. Skarphedinn came down on his feet, and tried again the second time, and climbs up the wall with a run, then down on him came the wall- plate, and he toppled down again inside.

Then Skarphedinn said, "Now one can see what will come;"[1] and then he went along the side wall. Gunnar Lambi's son leapt up on the wall and sees Skarphedinn, he spoke thus, "Weepest thou now, Skarphedinn?"

"Not so," says Skarphedinn; "but true it is that the smoke makes one's eyes smart,[2] but is it as it seems to me, dost thou laugh?"

"So it is surely," says Gunnar, "and I have never laughed since thou slewest Thrain on Markfleet."

Then Skarphedinn said, "Here now is a keepsake for thee;" and with that he took out of his purse the jaw-tooth[3] which he had hewn out of Thrain, and threw it at Gunnar, and struck him in the eye, so that it started out and lay on his cheek.

Then Gunnar fell down from the roof.

Skarphedinn then went to his brother Grim, and they held one another by the hand and trode the fire; but when they came to the middle of the hall Grim fell down dead.

Then Skarphedinn went to the end of the house, and then there was a great crash, and down fell the roof. Skarphedinn was then shut in between it and the gable, and so he could not stir a step thence.

Flosi and his band stayed by the fire until it was broad daylight; then came a man riding up to them. Flosi asked him for his name, but he said his name was Geirmund, and that he was a kinsman of the sons of Sigfus.

"Ye have done a mighty deed," he says.

"Men," said Flosi, "will call it both a mighty deed and an ill deed,[4] but that can't be helped now."

"How many men have lost their lives here?" asks Geirmund.

"Here have died," says Flosi, "Njal and Bergthora and all their sons, Thord Kari's son, Kari Solmund's son, but besides these we cannot say for a surety, because we know not their names."

"Thou tellest him now dead," said Geirmund, "with whom we have gossiped this morning."

"Who is that?" says Flosi.

"We two," says Geirmund, "I and my neighbour Bard, met Kari Solmund's son, and Bard gave him his horse, and his hair and his upper clothes were burned off him!"

"Had he any weapons?" asks Flosi.

"He had the sword 'Life-luller,'" says Geirmund, "and one edge of it was blue with fire, and Bard and I said that it must have become soft, but he answered thus, that he would harden it in the blood of the sons of Sigfus or the other Burners."

"What said he of Skarphedinn?" said Flosi.

"He said both he and Grim were alive," answers Geirmund, "when they parted; but he said that now they must be dead."

"Thou hast told us a tale," said Flosi, "which bodes us no idle peace, for that man hath now got away who comes next to Gunnar of Lithend in all things; and now, ye sons of Sigfus, and ye other burners, know this, that such a great blood feud, and hue and cry will be made about this burning, that it will make many a man headless, but some will lose all their goods. Now I doubt much whether any man of you, ye sons of Sigfus, will dare to stay in his house; and that is not to be wondered at; and so I will bid you all to come and stay with me in the east, and let us all share one fate."

They thanked him for his offer, and said they would be glad to take it.

Then Modolf Kettle's son, sang a song:

"But one prop of Njal's house liveth,
All the rest inside are burnt,
All but one--those bounteous spenders,
Sigfus' stalwart sons wrought this;
Son of Gollnir (1) now is glutted
Vengeance for brave Hauskuld's death,
Brisk flew fire through thy dwelling,
Bright flames blazed above thy roof."

"We shall have to boast of something else than that Njal has been burnt in his house," says Flosi, "for there is no glory in that."

Then he went up on the gable, and Glum Hilldir's son, and some other men. Then Glum said, "Is Skarphedinn dead, indeed?" But the others said he must have been dead long ago.

The fire sometimes blazed up fitfully and sometimes burned low, and then they heard down in the fire beneath them that this song was sung:

"Deep, I ween, ye Ogre offspring
Devilish brood of giant birth,
Would ye groan with gloomy visage
Had the fight gone to my mind;
But my very soul it gladdens
That my friends I who now boast high,
Wrought not this foul deed, their glory,
Save with footsteps filled with gore."

"Can Skarphedinn, think ye, have sung this song dead or alive?" said Grani Gunnar's son.

"I will go into no guesses about that," says Flosi.

"We will look for Skarphedinn," says Grani, "and the other men who have been here burnt inside the house."

"That shall not be," says Flosi, "it is just like such foolish men as thou art, now that men will be gathering force all over the country; and when they do come, I trow the very same man who now lingers will be so scared that he will not know which way to run; and now my counsel is that we all ride away as quickly as ever we can."

Then Flosi went hastily to his horse and all his men.

Then Flosi said to Geirmund, "Is Ingialld, thinkest thou, at home at the Springs?"

Geirmund said he thought he must be at home.

"There now is a man," says Flosi, "who has broken his oath with us and all good faith."

Then Flosi said to the sons of Sigfus, "What course will ye now take with Ingialld; will ye forgive him, or shall we now fall on him and slay him?"

They all answered that they would rather fall on him and slay him.

Then Flosi jumped on his horse, and all the others, and they rode away. Flosi rode first, and shaped his course for Rangriver, and up along the river bank.

Then he saw a man riding down on the other bank of the river and he knew that there was Ingialld of the Springs. Flosi calls out to him. Ingialld halted and turned down to the river bank; and Flosi said to him, "Thou hast broken faith with us, and hast forfeited life and goods. Here now are the sons of Sigfus, who are eager to slay thee; but methinks thou hast fallen into a strait, and I will give thee thy life if thou will hand over to me the right to make my own award."

"I will sooner ride to meet Kari," said Ingialld, "than grant thee the right to utter thine own award, and my answer to the sons of Sigfus is this, that I shall be no whit more afraid of them than they are of me."

"Bide thou there," says Flosi, "if thou art not a coward, for I will send thee a gift."

"I will bide of a surety," says Ingialld.

Thorstein Kolbein's son, Flosi's brother's son, rode up by his side and had a spear in his hand, he was one of the bravest of men, and the most worthy of those who were with Flosi.

Flosi snatched the spear from him, and launched it at Ingialld, and it fell on his left side, and passed through the shield just below the handle, and clove it all asunder, but the spear passed on into his thigh just above the knee-pan, and so on into the saddle-tree, and there stood fast.

Then Flosi said to Ingialld, "Did it touch thee?

"It touched me sure enough," says Ingialld, "but I call this a scratch and not a wound."

Then Ingialld plucked the spear out of the wound, and said to Flosi, "Now bide thou, if thou art not a milksop."

Then he launched the spear back over the river. Flosi sees that the spear is coming straight for his middle, and then he backs his horse out of the way, but the spear flew in front of Flosi's horse, and missed him, but it struck Thorstein's middle, and down he fell at once dead off his horse.

Now Ingialld runs for the wood, and they could not get at him.

Then Flosi said to his men, "Now have we gotten manscathe, and now we may know, when such things befall us, into what a luckless state we have got. Now it is my counsel that we ride up to Threecorner Ridge; thence we shall be able to see where men ride all over the country, for by this time they will have gathered together a great band, and they will think that we have ridden east to Fleetlithe from Threecorner Ridge; and thence they will think that we are riding north up on the fell, and so east to our own country, and thither the greater part of the folk will ride after us; but some will ride the coast road east to Selialandsmull, and yet they will think there is less hope of finding us thitherward, but I will now take counsel for all of us, and my plan is to ride up into Threecorner-fell, and bide there till three suns have risen and set in heaven."

References

  1. see what will come: "Skarpheðinn has done everything he could to show that he is not giving up, but at this point he realizes that there is nothing more he can do except follow the course that has been marked out for him — whatever the force that has marked it (the sentence in Old Norse has no grammatical subject). As a final gesture to show that he is not submitting without a fight, he throws the tooth that knocks out Gunnarr Lambasson’s eye. He may be up against forces that are much bigger than he is, but Skarpheðinn himself is in charge of how he faces this situation." Bek-Pedersen, Karen. Fate Weaving (p. 29).
  2. "Not so," says Skarphedinn; "but true it is that the smoke makes one's eyes smart,: " Andsvar Skarphéðins beinir athyglinni frá gráti sem tilfinningaathöfn. Þungamiðja merkingarinnar færist frá tárunum sjálfum (og mögulegu tilfinningaróti sem liggur þar að baki) til smávægilegra óþæginda vegna reyksins. Sú yfirlýsing er augljóslega í hrópandi andstöðu við aðstæður hans, sem lesendur eru hins vegar fullkomlega meðvitaðir um, og dregur að engu leyti úr þeim undirliggjandi harmi sem lesandi gefur sér að Skarphéðinn upplifi þegar hann stendur frammi fyrir dauða sínum og fjölskyldu sinnar. Afneitunin gefur enn fremur til kynna að ákveðna togstreitu í textanum sem hefur með hugmyndir og gildismat á karlmennsku að gera." Sif Ríkharðsdóttir. Hugræn fræði, tilfinningar og miðaldir (s. 78).
  3. took out of his purse the jaw-tooth: "Frásögnin um jaxlinn Þráins í k. 130, sem sumum kann að hafa þótt gaman að, er hlægilegt skrök; Skarphjeðinn á að hafa geymt hann í pússi sínum og meitt mann með því að kasta honum í augað á honum, „svá at þegar lá úti á kinninni“ (!!). Alt þetta er úngt innskot, það sjest m.a. af því, að þar sem sagt er frá drápi Þráins (úr honum átti jaxlinn að vera), er jaxlsins alls ekki getið; aðeins í einu hdr. er það nefnt, en setningin er þar auðsjáanlega innskot." Finnur Jónsson. Um íslenska sagnaritun og um Njálu sjerstaklega (p. 23).
  4. ill deed: "In any case, Flosi is conscious of his deed with all of its impact and consequences, and he also knows the ambivalent reception of this action among the people (…). It is certainly clear for Flosi that, this way, the conflict is by no means settled and that, on the contrary, a judicial follow-up - after all, Njáll was not an outlaw - and vengeful actions are to be expected from Kári and Njál's closest relatives." Müller, Harald. "-und gut ist keines von beiden" (p. 202)

Kafli 130

Nú er sagt frá Skarphéðni að hann hleypur út á þvertréið þegar eftir Kára. En er hann kom þar er mest var brunnið þvertréið þá brast niður undir honum. Skarphéðinn kom fótum undir sig og réð þegar til í annað sinn og rennur upp vegginn. Þá reið að honum brúnásinn og hrataði hann inn aftur.

Skarphéðinn mælti þá: „Sé eg nú hversu vera vill.“[1]

Gekk hann þá fram með hliðvegginum.

Gunnar Lambason hljóp upp á vegginn og sér Skarphéðin. Hann mælti svo: „Hvort grætur þú nú, Skarphéðinn?“

„Eigi er það,“ segir hann, „en hitt er satt að súrnar í augunum.[2] En hvort er sem mér sýnist, hlærðu?“

„Svo er víst,“ segir Gunnar, „og hefi eg aldrei fyrr hlegið síðan þú vóst Þráin á Markarfljóti.“

Skarphéðinn mælti: „Þá er þér hér nú minjagripurinn.“

Tók hann þá jaxl úr pússi sínum[3] er hann hafði höggvið úr Þráni og kastaði til Gunnars og kom í augað svo þegar lá úti á kinninni. Féll Gunnar þá ofan af þekjunni.

Skarphéðinn gekk þá til Gríms bróður síns. Héldust þeir þá í hendur og tróðu eldinn. En er þeir komu í miðjan skálann þá féll Grímur dauður niður. Skarphéðinn gekk þá til enda hússins. Þá varð brestur mikill. Brast þá ofan þekjan. Varð Skarphéðinn þá þar í millum og gaflhlaðsins. Mátti hann þá þaðan hvergi hrærast.

Þeir Flosi voru við eldana þar til er morgnað var mjög. Þá kom þar maður einn ríðandi að þeim.

Flosi spurði hann að nafni en hann nefndist Geirmundur og kvaðst vera frændi Sigfússona. „Þér hafið mikið stórvirki unnið,“ segir hann.

Flosi mælti: „Bæði munu menn þetta kalla stórvirki og illvirki.[4] En þó má nú ekki að hafa.“

„Hversu margt hefir hér fyrirmanna látist?“ segir Geirmundur.

Flosi svarar: „Hér hefir látist Njáll og Bergþóra og synir þeirra allir, Þórður Kárason, Kári Sölmundarson, Þórður leysingi. En þá vitum vér ógjörla um fleiri menn þá er oss eru ókunnari.“

Geirmundur mælti: „Dauðan segir þú þann nú er vér höfum hjalað við í morgun.“

„Hver er sá?“ segir Flosi.

„Kára Sölmundarson fundum við Bárður búi minn,“ segir Geirmundur, „og fékk Bárður honum hest sinn og var brunnið af honum hárið og svo klæðin.“

„Hafði hann nokkuð vopna?“ segir Flosi.

„Hafði hann sverðið Fjörsváfni,“ segir Geirmundur, „og var blánaður annar eggteinninn og sögðum við Bárður að dignað mundi hafa en hann svaraði því að hann skyldi herða í blóði Sigfússona eða annarra brennumanna.“

Flosi mælti: „Hvað sagði hann til Skarphéðins?“

Geirmundur svarar: „Á lífi sagði hann þá Grím báða þá er þeir skildu en þó kvað hann þá nú mundu dauða.“

Flosi mælti: „Sagt hefir þú oss þá sögu er oss mun eigi setugrið bjóða því að sá maður hefir nú á braut komist er næst gengur Gunnari að Hlíðarenda um alla hluti. Skuluð þér nú það vita, Sigfússynir og aðrir brennumenn, að svo mikið eftirmál mun hér verða um brennu þessa að margan mun það gera höfuðlausan en sumir munu ganga frá öllu fénu. Grunar mig nú það að engi yðvar Sigfússona þori að sitja í búi sínu og er það rétt að vonum. Vil eg nú bjóða yður öllum austur til mín og láta eitt yfir oss ganga alla.“

Þeir þökkuðu honum boð sitt og kváðust það þiggja mundu.

Þá kvað Móðólfur Ketilsson vísu:

38. Stafur lifir einn, þar er inni
unnfoss viðir brunnu,
synir ollu því snjallir
Sigfúss, Níals húsa.
Nú er, Gollnis son, goldinn,
gekk eldur of sjöt rekka,
ljós brann hyr í húsum,
Höskulds bani hins röskva.

„Öðru nokkuru munum vér hælast mega en því er Njáll hefir inni brunnið því að það er engi frami,“ sagði Flosi.

Hann gekk þá upp á gaflhlaðið og Glúmur Hildisson og nokkurir menn aðrir.

Þá mælti Glúmur: „Hvort mun Skarphéðinn dauður?“

En aðrir sögðu hann fyrir löngu dauðan mundu vera. Þar gaus upp stundum eldurinn en stundum slokknaði niður. Þeir heyrðu þá niðri í eldinum fyrir sér að kveðin var vísa:

39. Mundit mellu kindar
miðjungs brúar Iðja
Gunnur um geira sennu
galdurs bráregni halda,
er hræstykkis hlakka
hrausts síns vinir mínu
tryggvi eg óð og eggjar
undgengin spor dundu.

Grani Gunnarsson mælti: „Hvort mun Skarphéðinn hafa kveðið vísu þessa lífs eða dauður?“

„Engum getum mun eg um það leiða,“ segir Flosi.

„Leita viljum vér Skarphéðins,“ segir Grani, „eða annarra manna þeirra sem hér hafa inni brunnið.“

„Eigi skal það,“ segir Flosi, „og eru slíkt heimskir menn sem þú ert þar sem menn munu safna liði um allt héraðið. Mun sá allur einn er nú á dvalar og þá mun verða svo hræddur að eigi mun vita hvert hlaupa skal og er það mitt ráð að vér ríðum allir í braut sem skjótast.“

Flosi gekk þá skyndilega til hesta sinna og allir hans menn.

Flosi mælti þá til Geirmundar: „Hvort mun Ingjaldur heima að Keldum?“

Geirmundur kvaðst ætla að hann mundi heima vera.

„Þar er sá maður,“ segir Flosi, „er rofið hefir eiða við oss og allan trúnað.“

Flosi mælti þá til Sigfússona: „Hvern kost viljið þér nú gera Ingjaldi? Hvort viljið þér gefa honum upp eða skulum vér nú fara að honum og drepa hann?“

Þeir svöruðu allir að þeir vildu nú fara að honum og drepa hann.

Flosi hljóp þá á hest sinn og allir þeir og riðu í braut. Flosi reið fyrir og stefndi upp til Rangár og upp með ánni. Þá sá hann mann ríða ofan öðrum megin árinnar. Hann kenndi að þar var Ingjaldur frá Keldum. Flosi kallar á hann. Ingjaldur nam þá staðar og sneri við fram að ánni.

Flosi mælti til hans: „Þú hefir rofið sátt við oss og hefir þú fyrirgert fé og fjörvi. Eru hér nú Sigfússynir og vilja gjarna drepa þig. En mér þykir þú við vant um kominn og mun eg gefa þér líf ef þú vilt selja mér sjálfdæmi.“

„Fyrr skal eg nú ríða til móts við Kára en selja þér sjálfdæmi. En eg vil því svara Sigfússonum að eg skal eigi hræddari við þá en þeir eru við mig.“

Flosi mælti: „Bíð þú þá ef þú ert eigi ragur því að eg skal senda þér sending.“

„Bíða skal eg víst,“ segir Ingjaldur.

Þorsteinn Kolbeinsson bróðurson Flosa reið fram hjá honum og hafði spjót í hendi. Hann var röskvastur maður með Flosa einnhver og mest verður. Flosi þreif af honum spjótið og skaut til Ingjalds og kom á hina vinstri hliðina og í gegnum skjöldinn fyrir neðan mundriðann og klofnaði hann allur í sundur. En spjótið hljóp í lærið fyrir ofan knéskelina og svo í söðulfjölina og nam þar staðar.

Flosi mælti þá til Ingjalds: „Hvort kom á þig?“

„Á mig kom víst,“ segir Ingjaldur, „og kalla eg þetta skeinu en ekki sár.“

Ingjaldur kippti þá spjótinu úr sárinu og mælti til Flosa: „Bíddu nú ef þú ert eigi blauður.“

Hann skaut þá spjótinu aftur yfir ána. Flosi sér að spjótið stefnir á hann miðjan. Hopar hann þá hestinum undan en spjótið fló fyrir framan hestinn Flosa og missti hans. Spjótið kom á Þorstein miðjan og féll hann þegar dauður af hestinum. Ingjaldur hleypir nú í skóginn og náðu þeir honum ekki.

Flosi mælti þá til sinna manna: „Nú höfum vér fenginn mannskaða. Megum vér nú og vita er þetta hefir að borist hvert heillaleysi vér höfum. Er það nú mitt ráð að vér ríðum á Þríhyrningshálsa. Megum vér þaðan sjá mannareið um allt héraðið því að þeir munu nú hafa sem mestan liðssafnað og munu þeir ætla að vér höfum riðið austur til Fljótshlíðar af Þríhyrningshálsum. Og munu þeir þá ætla að vér ríðum austur á fjall og svo austur til héraða. Mun þangað eftir ríða mestur hluti liðsins en sumir munu ríða hið fremra austur til Seljalandsmúla og mun þeim þó þykja þangað vor minni von. En eg mun nú gera ráð fyrir oss og er það mitt ráð að vér ríðum upp í fjallið Þríhyrning og bíðum þar til þess er þrjár sólir eru af himni.“

Þeir gera nú svo.

Tilvísanir

  1. hversu vera vill: "Skarpheðinn has done everything he could to show that he is not giving up, but at this point he realizes that there is nothing more he can do except follow the course that has been marked out for him — whatever the force that has marked it (the sentence in Old Norse has no grammatical subject). As a final gesture to show that he is not submitting without a fight, he throws the tooth that knocks out Gunnarr Lambasson’s eye. He may be up against forces that are much bigger than he is, but Skarpheðinn himself is in charge of how he faces this situation." Bek-Pedersen, Karen. Fate Weaving (s. 29).
  2. Eigi er það,“ segir hann, „en hitt er satt að súrnar í augunum.: " Andsvar Skarphéðins beinir athyglinni frá gráti sem tilfinningaathöfn. Þungamiðja merkingarinnar færist frá tárunum sjálfum (og mögulegu tilfinningaróti sem liggur þar að baki) til smávægilegra óþæginda vegna reyksins. Sú yfirlýsing er augljóslega í hrópandi andstöðu við aðstæður hans, sem lesendur eru hins vegar fullkomlega meðvitaðir um, og dregur að engu leyti úr þeim undirliggjandi harmi sem lesandi gefur sér að Skarphéðinn upplifi þegar hann stendur frammi fyrir dauða sínum og fjölskyldu sinnar. Afneitunin gefur enn fremur til kynna að ákveðna togstreitu í textanum sem hefur með hugmyndir og gildismat á karlmennsku að gera." Sif Ríkharðsdóttir. Hugræn fræði, tilfinningar og miðaldir (s. 78).
  3. jaxl úr pússi sínum: "Frásögnin um jaxlinn Þráins í k. 130, sem sumum kann að hafa þótt gaman að, er hlægilegt skrök; Skarphjeðinn á að hafa geymt hann í pússi sínum og meitt mann með því að kasta honum í augað á honum, „svá at þegar lá úti á kinninni“ (!!). Alt þetta er úngt innskot, það sjest m.a. af því, að þar sem sagt er frá drápi Þráins (úr honum átti jaxlinn að vera), er jaxlsins alls ekki getið; aðeins í einu hdr. er það nefnt, en setningin er þar auðsjáanlega innskot." Finnur Jónsson. Um íslenska sagnaritun og um Njálu sjerstaklega (s. 23).
  4. illvirki: "In any case, Flosi is conscious of his deed with all of its impact and consequences, and he also knows the ambivalent reception of this action among the people (…). It is certainly clear for Flosi that, this way, the conflict is by no means settled and that, on the contrary, a judicial follow-up - after all, Njáll was not an outlaw - and vengeful actions are to be expected from Kári and Njál's closest relatives." Müller, Harald. "-und gut ist keines von beiden" (s. 202)

Links

Personal tools