Njála, 139

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 139

OF ASGRIM, AND GIZUR, AND KARI.


Now Asgrim Ellidagrim's son talks to Gizur the White, and Kari Solmund's son, and to Hjallti Skeggi's son, Mord Valgard's son, and Thorgeir Craggeir, and says, "There is no need to have any secrets here, for only those men are by who know all our counsel. Now I will ask you if ye know anything of their plans, for if you do, it seems to me that we must take fresh counsel about our own plans."

"Snorri the Priest," answers Gizur the White, "sent a man to me, and bade him tell me that Flosi had gotten great help from the Northlanders; but that Eyjolf Bolverk's son, his kinsman, had had a gold ring given him by some one, and made a secret of it, and Snorri said it was his meaning that Eyjolf Bolverk's son must be meant to defend the suit at law, and that the ring must have been given him for that."

They were all agreed that it must be so. Then Gizur spoke to them, "Now has Mord Valgard's son, my son-in-law, undertaken a suit, which all must think most hard, to prosecute Flosi; and now my wish is that ye share the other suits amongst you, for now it will soon be time to give notice of the suits at the Hill of Laws. We shall need also to ask for more help."

Asgrim said so it should be, "but we will beg thee to go round with us when we ask for help." Gizur said he would be ready to do that.

After that Gizur picked out all the wisest men of their company to go with him as his backers. There was Hjallti Skeggi's son, and Asgrim, and Kari, and Thorgeir Craggeir.

Then Gizur the White said, "Now will we first go to the booth of Skapti Thorod's son," and they do so. Gizur the White went first, then Hjallti, then Kari, then Asgrim, then Thorgeir Craggeir, and then his brothers.

They went into the booth. Skapti sat on the cross bench on the dais, and when he saw Gizur the White he rose up to meet him, and greeted him and all of them well, and bade Gizur to sit down by him, and he does so. Then Gizur said to Asgrim, "Now shalt thou first raise the question of help with Skapti, but I will throw in what I think good."

"We are come hither," said Asgrim, "for this sake, Skapti, to seek help and aid at thy hand."

"I was thought to be hard to win the last time," said Skapti, "when I would not take the burden of your trouble on me."

"It is quite another matter now," said Gizur. "Now the feud is for master Njal and mistress Bergthora, who were burnt in their own house without a cause, and for Njal's three sons, and many other worthy men, and thou wilt surely never be willing to yield no help to men, or to stand by thy kinsmen and connections."

"It was in my mind," answers Skapti, "when Skarphedinn told me that I had myself borne tar on my own head, and cut up a sod of turf and crept under it, and when he said that I had been so afraid that Thorolf Lopt's son of Eyrar bore me abroad in his ship among his meal-sacks, and so carried me to Iceland, that I would never share in the blood feud for his death."

"Now there is no need to bear such things in mind," said Gizur the White, "for he is dead who said that, and thou wilt surely grant me this, though thou wouldst not do it for other men's sake."

"This quarrel," says Skapti, "is no business of thine, except thou choosest to be entangled in it along with them."

Then Gizur was very wrath, and said, "Thou art unlike thy father, though he was thought not to be quite cleanhanded; yet was he ever helpful to men when they needed him most."

"We are unlike in temper," said Skapti. "Ye two, Asgrim and thou, think that ye have had the lead in mighty deeds; thou, Gizur the White, because thou overcamest Gunnar of Lithend; but Asgrim, for that he slew Gauk, his foster-brother."

"Few," said Asgrim, "bring forward the better if they know the worse, but many would say that I slew not Gauk ere I was driven to it.[1] There is some excuse for thee for not helping us, but none for heaping reproaches on us; and I only wish before this Thing is out that thou mayest get from this suit the greatest disgrace, and that there may be none to make thy shame good."

Then Gizur and his men stood up all of them, and went out, and so on to the booth of Snorri the Priest.

Snorri sat on the cross-bench in his booth; they went into the booth, and he knew the men at once, and stood up to meet them, and bade them all welcome, and made room for them to sit by him.

After that, they asked one another the news of the day.

Then Asgrim spoke to Snorri, and said, "For that am I and my kinsman Gizur come hither, to ask thee for thy help."

"Thou speakest of what thou mayest always be forgiven for asking, for help in the blood-feud after such connections as thou hadst. We, too, got many wholesome counsels from Njal, though few now bear that in mind; but as yet I know not of what ye think ye stand most in need."

"We stand most in need," answers Asgrim, "of brisk lads and good weapons, if we fight them here at the Thing."

"True it is," said Snorri, "that much lies on that, and it is likeliest that ye will press them home with daring, and that they will defend themselves so in like wise, and neither of you will allow the others' right. Then ye will not bear with them and fall on them, and that will be the only way left; for then they will seek to pay you off with shame for manscathe, and with dishonour for loss of kin."

It was easy to see that he goaded them on in everything.

Then Gizur the White said "Thou speakest well, Snorri, and thou behavest ever most like a chief when most lies at stake."

"I wish to know," said Asgrim, "in what way thou wilt stand by us if things turn out as thou sayest."

"I will show thee those marks of friendship," said Snorri, "on which all your honour will hang, but I will not go with you to the court. But if ye fight here on the Thing, do not fall on them at all unless ye are all most steadfast and dauntless, for you have great champions against you. But if ye are overmatched, ye must let yourselves be driven hither towards us, for I shall then have drawn up my men in array hereabouts, and shall be ready to stand by you. But if it falls out otherwise, and they give way before you, my meaning is that they will try to run for a stronghold in the "Great Rift." But if they come thither, then ye will never get the better of them. Now I will take that on my hands, to draw up my men there, and guard the pass to the stronghold, but we will not follow them whether they turn north or south along the river. And when you have slain out of their band about as many as I think ye will be able to pay blood-fines[2] for, and yet keep your priesthoods and abodes, then I will run up with all my men and part you. Then ye shall promise to do as I bid you, and stop the battle, if I on my part do what I have now promised."

Gizur thanked him kindly, and said that what he had said was just what they all needed, and then they all went out.

"Whither shall we go now?" said Gizur.

"To the Nortlanders' booth," said Asgrim.

Then they fared thither.

References

  1. many would say that I slew not Gauk ere I was driven to it.: “Gaukr Trandilsson is a character in Njáls saga: chapter 26 of Njáls saga notes how Gaukr is killed by his foster brother, Ásgrimr Elliða-Grimsson, and this incident is referred to again later on in chapter 139. This intersection would make *Gauks saga a good one to pair with Njáls saga.” Lethbridge, Emily. „Hvorki glansar gull á mér/né glæstir stafir í línum“. (s. 62).
  2. pay blood-fines: "As long as the victor still figures he might have to pay the loser for his losses, we have not fully abandoned the world of feud for the world of war, even though the saga shows things moving in that direction." Miller, William Ian. Kari and Friends: Chapters 145–55 (p. 278).

Kafli 139

Nú talar Ásgrímur Elliða-Grímsson við Gissur hvíta og Kára Sölmundarson, Hjalta Skeggjason, Mörð Valgarðsson, Þorgeir skorargeir: „Ekki þarf þetta í hljóðmæli að færa því að þeir einir menn eru hér að hver veit annars trúnað. Vil eg nú spyrja yður ef þér vitið nokkuð til ráðagerðar þeirra Flosa. Sýnist mér sem vér munum verða að gera ráð vort í annan stað.“

Gissur hvíti svarar: „Snorri goði sendi mann til mín og lét segja mér að Flosi hafði þegið mikið lið af Norðlendingum en Eyjólfur Bölverksson frændi hans hafði þegið gullhring af nokkurum og fór leynilega með. Og kvað Snorri það ætlan sína að Eyjólfur Bölverksson mundi ætlaður vera til að færa fram lögvarnir í málinu og mundi hringurinn til þess gefinn vera.“

Þeir urðu allir á það sáttir að það mundi svo vera.

Gissur mælti þá til þeirra: „Nú hefir Mörður Valgarðsson mágur minn tekið við málinu því er öllum mun torveldlegast þykja, að sækja Flosa. Vil eg nú að þér skiptið öðrum sóknum með yður því að nú mun brátt verða að lýsa sökum að Lögbergi. Vér munum og þurfa að biðja oss liðs.“

Ásgrímur sagði svo vera skyldu „en biðja viljum vér þig að þú sért í liðsbóninni með oss.“

Gissur kvaðst það mundu til leggja.

Síðan valdi Gissur með sér alla hina vitrustu menn af liði þeirra. Þar var Hjalti Skeggjason og Ásgrímur og Kári, Þorgeir skorargeir.

Þá mælti Gissur hvíti: „Nú munum vér fyrst ganga til búðar Skafta Þóroddssonar.“

Þeir gera nú svo. Gissur hvíti gekk fyrstur, þá Hjalti, þá Kári, þá Ásgrímur, þá Þorgeir skorargeir, þá bræður hans. Þeir gengu inn í búðina. Skafti sat á palli. Og er hann sá Gissur hvíta stóð hann upp í móti honum og fagnaði honum vel og öllum þeim og bað Gissur sitja hjá sér. Hann gerir nú svo.

Gissur mælti þá til Ásgríms: „Nú skaltu vekja til um liðveisluna við Skafta fyrst en eg mun leggja til slíkt sem sýnist.“

Ásgrímur mælti: „Til þess erum vér hingað komnir, Skafti, að sækja að þér traust og liðsinni.“

Skafti mælti: „Torsóttur þótti eg vera næstum er eg vildi ekki taka undir vandræði yður.“

Gissur mælti: „Nú er annan veg til farið. Nú er að mæla eftir Njál bónda og Bergþóru húsfreyju er saklaus voru inni brennd og eftir þrjá sonu Njáls og marga aðra menn. Og muntu aldrei það vilja gera að verða mönnum eigi að liði og veita frændum þínum og mágum.“

Skafti svarar: „Það var mér þá í hug er Skarphéðinn mælti við mig að eg hefði sjálfur borið tjöru í höfuð mér og skorið á mig jarðarmen og hann kvað mig orðið hafa svo hræddan að Þórólfur Loftsson bæri mig á skip út í mjölkýlum sínum og flutti mig svo til Íslands, að eg mundi eigi eftir hann mæla.“

Gissur hvíti mælti: „Ekki er nú á slíkt að minnast því að sá er nú dauður er þetta mælti og muntu vilja veita mér þótt þú viljir eigi gera fyrir sakir annarra manna.“

Skafti svarar: „Þetta mál kemur ekki til þín nema þú viljir vasast í með þeim.“

Gissur reiddist þá mjög og mælti: „Ólíkur ertu þínum föður. Þótt hann þætti nokkuð blandinn varð hann mönnum þó jafnan að liði er menn þurftu hans mest.“

Skafti mælti: „Vér erum óskaplíkir. Þið þykist hafa staðið í stórræðum. Þú, Gissur hvíti, þá er þú sóttir Gunnar að Hlíðarenda en Ásgrímur af því er hann drap Gauk fóstbróður sinn.“

Ásgrímur svarar: „Fár bregður hinu betra ef hann veit hið verra. En það munu margir mæla að eigi dræpi eg Gauk fyrr en mér væri nauður á. [1] Er þér það nokkuð vorkunnarlaust að þú bregðir oss brigslum. Mundi eg það vilja um það er þessu þingi er lokið að þú fengir af þessum málum hina mestu óvirðing og bætti þér engi þá skömm.“

Þeir Gissur stóðu þá upp allir og gengu út og svo til búðar Snorra goða. Snorri sat á palli í búðinni. Þeir gengu inn í búðina. Hann kenndi þegar mennina og stóð upp í móti þeim og bað þá alla vel komna og gaf þeim rúm að sitja hjá sér. Síðan spurðust þeir almæltra tíðinda.

Ásgrímur mælti til Snorra: „Til þess erum við Gissur frændi minn komnir hingað að biðja þig liðveislu.“

Snorri goði svarar: „Það mælir þú þar er þér heldur vorkunn til, að mæla eftir mága þína slíka sem þú áttir. Þágum vér mörg ráð þægileg af Njáli þótt nú muni það fáir. Enda veit eg eigi hverrar liðveislu þér þykist mest þurfa.“

Ásgrímur svarar: „Mest þurfum vér ef vér berjumst hér á þinginu.“

Snorri mælti: „Svo er og að mikið liggur yður þá við. Er það og líkast að þér sækið með kappi enda munu þeir svo verja. Og munu hvorigir gera öðrum rétt. Munuð þér þá eigi þola þeim og ráða á þá. Er þá og sá einn til því að þeir vilja þá gjalda yður skömm fyrir mannskaða en svívirðing fyrir frændalát.“

Fannst það á að hann hvatti þá fram í öllu.

Gissur hvíti mælti þá: „Vel mælir þú, Snorri, og fer þér þá best jafnan og höfðinglegast er mest liggur við.“

Ásgrímur mælti: „Það vil eg vita hvað þú vilt þá veita oss ef svo fer sem þú segir.“

Snorri mælti: „Gera skal eg það vináttubragð þér er yður sæmd skal öll við liggja. En ekki mun eg til dóma ganga. En ef þér verðið forviða þá ráðið þér því aðeins á þá nema þér séuð allir sem öruggastir því að miklir kappar eru til móts. En ef þér verðið forviða munuð þér láta slá hingað til móts við oss því að eg mun þá hafa fylkt liði mínu hér fyrir og vera búinn að veita yður. En ef hinn veg fer að þeir hrökkvi fyrir þá er það ætlan mín að þeir muni ætla að renna til vígis í Almannagjá en ef þeir komast þangað þá fáið þér þá aldrei sótta. Mun eg það á hendur takast að fylkja þar fyrir liði mínu og verja þeim vígið en ekki munum vér eftir ganga hvort sem þeir hörfa með ánni norður eða suður. Og þá er þér hafið vegið í lið þeirra svo nokkuru mjög að mér þyki þér mega halda upp fébótum[2] svo að þér haldið goðorðum yðrum og héraðsvistum mun eg til hlaupa með menn mína alla og skilja yður. Skuluð þér þá gera það fyrir mín orð að hætta bardaganum ef eg geri þetta sem nú hefi eg heitið.“

Gissur þakkaði honum vel og kvað þetta í allra þeirra nauðsyn mælt vera. Gengu þeir þá út allir.

Gissur mælti: „Hvert skulum vér nú ganga?“

„Til Norðlendingabúða,“ sagði Ásgrímur.



Tilvísanir

  1. munu margir mæla að eigi dræpi eg Gauk fyrr en mér væri nauður á. : “Gaukr Trandilsson is a character in Njáls saga: chapter 26 of Njáls saga notes how Gaukr is killed by his foster brother, Ásgrimr Elliða-Grimsson, and this incident is referred to again later on in chapter 139. This intersection would make *Gauks saga a good one to pair with Njáls saga.” Lethbridge, Emily. „Hvorki glansar gull á mér/né glæstir stafir í línum“. (s. 62).
  2. halda upp fébótum: "As long as the victor still figures he might have to pay the loser for his losses, we have not fully abandoned the world of feud for the world of war, even though the saga shows things moving in that direction." Miller, William Ian. Kari and Friends: Chapters 145–55 (s. 278).

Links

Personal tools