Njála, 036

From WikiSaga
Jump to: navigation, search


Contents

Chapter 36

Gunnar rode away to the Thing, but before he rode from home he said to Hallgerda, "Be good now while I am away, and show none of thine ill temper in anything with which my friends have to do."

"The trolls take thy friends," says Hallgerda.

So Gunnar rode to the Thing, and saw it was not good to come to words with her. Njal rode to the Thing too, and all his sons with him.

Now it must be told of what tidings happened at home. Njal and Gunnar owned a wood in common at Redslip; they had not shared the wood, but each was wont to hew in it as he needed, and neither said a word to the other about that. Hallgerda's grieve's name was Kol; he had been with her long, and was one of the worst of men. There was a man named Swart; he was Njal's and Bergthora's housecarle; they were very fond of him. Now Bergthora told him that he must go up into Redslip and hew wood; but she said, "I will get men to draw home the wood."

He said he would do the work she set him to win; and so he went up into Redslip, and was to be there a week.

Some gangrel men came to Lithend from the east across Markfleet, and said that Swart had been in Redslip, and hewn wood, and done a deal of work.

"So," says Hallgerda, "Bergthora must mean to rob me in many things, but I'll take care that he does not hew again."

Rannveig, Gunnar's mother, heard that, and said, "There have been good housewives before now, though they never set their hearts on manslaughter."

Now the night wore away, and early next morning Hallgerda came to speak to Kol, and said, "I have thought of some work for thee;" and with that she put weapons into his hands, and went on to say--"Fare thou to Redslip; there wilt thou find Swart."

"What shall I do to him?" he says.

"Askest thou that, when thou art the worst of men?" she says. "Thou shalt kill him."

"I can get that done," he says, "but 'tis more likely that I shall lose my own life for it."

"Everything grows big in thy eyes," she says, "and thou behavest ill to say this after I have spoken up for thee in everything. I must get another man to do this if thou darest not."

He took the axe, and was very wroth, and takes a horse that Gunnar owned, and rides now till he comes east of Markfleet. There he got off and bided in the wood, till they had carried down the firewood, and Swart was left alone behind. Then Kol sprang on him, and said, "More folk can hew great strokes than thou alone;" and so he laid the axe on his head, and smote him his death-blow, and rides home afterwards, and tells Hallgerda of the slaying.

She said, "I shall take such good care of thee, that no harm shall come to thee."

"May be so," says he, "but I dreamt all the other way as I slept ere I did the deed."

Now they come up into the wood, and find Swart slain, and bear him home. Hallgerda sent a man to Gunnar at the Thing to tell him of the slaying. Gunnar said no hard words at first of Hallgerda to the messenger, and men knew not at first whether he thought well or ill of it. A little after he stood up, and bade his men go with him: they did so, and fared to Njal's booth. Gunnar sent a man to fetch Njal, and begged him to come out. Njal went out at once, and he and Gunnar fell a-talking, and Gunnar said, "I have to tell thee of the slaying of a man, and my wife and my grieve Kol were those who did it; but Swart, thy housecarle, fell before them."

Njal held his peace while he told him the whole story. Then Njal spoke, "Thou must take heed not to let her have her way in everything."

Gunnar said, "Thou thyself shalt settle the terms."

Njal spoke again, "'Twill be hard work for thee to atone for all Hallgerda's mischief; and somewhere else there will be a broader trail to follow than this which we two now have a share in, and yet, even here there will be much awanting before all be well; and herein we shall need to bear in mind the friendly words that passed between us of old; and something tells me that thou wilt come well out of it, but still thou wilt be sore tried."

Then Njal took the award into his own hands from Gunnar, and said, "I will not push this matter to the uttermost; thou shalt pay twelve ounces [1] of silver; but I will add this to my award, that if anything happens from our homestead about which thou hast to utter an award, thou wilt not be less easy in thy terms."

Gunnar paid up the money out of hand, and rode home afterwards. Njal, too, came home from the Thing, and his sons. Bergthora saw the money, and said, "This is very justly settled; but even as much money shall be paid for Kol as time goes on."

Gunnar came home from the Thing and blamed Hallgerda. She said, better men lay unatoned in many places. Gunnar said, she might have her way in beginning a quarrel, "but how the matter is to be settled rests with me."

Hallgerda was for ever chattering of Swart's slaying, but Bergthora liked that ill. Once Njal and her sons went up to Thorolfsfell to see about the house-keeping there, but that selfsame day this thing happened when Bergthora was out of doors: she sees a man ride up to the house on a black horse. She stayed there and did not go in, for she did not know the man. That man had a spear in his hand, and was girded with a short sword. She asked this man his name.

"Atli is my name," says he.

She asked whence he came.

"I am an Eastfirther," he says.

"Whither shalt thou go?" she says.

"I am a homeless man,"[2] says he, "and I thought to see Njal and Skarphedinn, and know if they would take me in."

"What work is handiest to thee?" says she.

"I am a man used to field-work," he says, "and many things else come very handy to me; but I will not hide from thee that I am a man of hard temper, and it has been many a man's lot before now to bind up wounds at my hand."

"I do not blame thee," she says, "though thou art no milksop."

Atli said, "Hast thou any voice in things here?"

"I am Njal's wife," she says, "and I have as much to say to our housefolk as he."

"Wilt thou take me in then?" says he.

"I will give thee thy choice of that," says she. "If thou wilt do all the work that I set before thee, and that, though I wish to send thee where a man's life is at stake."

"Thou must have so many men at thy beck," says he, "that thou wilt not need me for such work."

"That I will settle as I please," she says.

"We will strike a bargain on these terms," says he.

Then she took him into the household. Njal and his sons came home and asked Bergthora what man that might be?

"He is thy house-carle," she says, "and I took him in." Then she went on to say he was no sluggard at work.

"He will be a great worker enough, I daresay," says Njal, "but I do not know whether he will be such a good worker."

Skarphedinn was good to Atli.

Njal and his sons ride to the Thing in the course of the summer; Gunnar was also at the Thing.

Njal took out a purse of money.

"What money is that, father?"[3]

"Here is the money that Gunnar paid me for our housecarle last summer."

"That will come to stand thee in some stead," says Skarphedinn, and smiled as he spoke.

References

  1. twelve ounces: "Az összegek a következő módon alakulnak: Njautl szolgájáért, Svartért 12 ezüstöt kért, amely megfelelt egy cselédért fizetendő váltságnak." Gyönki, Viktória. Váltságfizetés a 10-11. századi Izlandon két nemzetségi sagában (p.29)
  2. I am a homeless man : " Although not specifically a vagrant, Atli introduces himself as a man without lodgings or employment (maðr vistlauss). This indicates that readers should be suspicious of this healthy man roaming the countryside looking for work. We immediately question why he is not in permanent employment and why he is travelling outside the moving days. There is no suggestion that he is a member of society fallen upon hard times and passed round the district as a pauper as provided for in the laws. Our prejudices are confirmed in his own summary of his character." Cochrane, Jamie. Gossips, Beggars, Assassins and Tramps (p. 63)
  3. "What money is that, father?": "But the cleverest and most devastating critique the author (of Njála) makes is one that reveals the conflicting incentives generated by paying compensation, rather than taking blood revenge instead. He severely undermines the idea that feud can be settled with money or property rather than blood. He shows that compensation, unless the specie is blood or exile, is at its core self-contradicting." Miller, William Ian. Bergthora vs. Hallgerd, Part I. The Theory: Chapters 35–45 (p. 79).

Kafli 36

Gunnar reið til þings. En áður hann reið heiman mælti hann til Hallgerðar: „Ver þú dæl meðan eg er í brautu og sýn af þér önga fárskapi þar sem við vini mína er um að eiga.“

„Tröll hafi þína vini,“ segir hún.

Gunnar ríður til þings og sá að eigi var gott orðum við hana að koma. Njáll reið til þings og synir hans allir.

Nú er frá því að segja hvað heima er tíðinda. Þeir áttu skóg saman, Njáll og Gunnar, í Rauðaskriðum. Þeir höfðu eigi skipt skóginum en hvor var vanur að höggva sem þurfti og taldi hvorgi á annan of það.

Kolur hét verkstjóri Hallgerðar. Hann hafði verið með henni lengi og var hið mesta illmenni.

Svartur hét maður. Hann var húskarl Njáls og Bergþóru. Þeim líkaði vel við hann. Bergþóra mælti við hann að hann skyldi fara í Rauðaskriður og höggva skóg „en eg mun fá til menn að draga heim viðinn.“

Hann kveðst vinna mundu það sem hún leggur fyrir hann. Hann fór upp í Rauðaskriður og skyldi þar vera viku.

Snauðir menn komu til Hlíðarenda austan frá Markarfljóti og sögðu að Svartur hafði verið í Rauðaskriðum og höggvið skóg og gert mikið að.

„Svo mun Bergþóra til ætla að ræna mig mörgu,“ segir Hallgerður, „en því skal eg ráða að hann höggvi eigi oftar.“

Rannveig heyrði, móðir Gunnars, og mælti: „Þó hafa húsfreyjur verið góðar þó að eigi hafi staðið í mannráðum.“

Nú leið af nóttin og of morguninn kom hún að máli við Kol og mælti: „Verk hefi eg hugað þér,“ segir hún og fékk honum í hendur vopn og mælti: „Farðu í Rauðaskriður. Þar munt þú finna Svart.“

„Hvað skal eg honum?“ segir hann.

„Spyr þú að því þar er þú ert hið mesta illmenni? Vega skalt þú hann,“ segir hún.

„Gert mun eg það geta,“ segir hann, „en það er líkara að eg gefi mig við.“

„Vex þér hvetvetna í augu,“ segir hún, „og fer þér illa þar sem eg hefi mælt eftir þér hvern hlut. Mun eg fá til annan mann að gera þetta ef þú þorir eigi.“

Hann tók öxina og var reiður mjög og tekur hest er Gunnar átti og ríður nú þar til er hann kom austur að Markarfljóti. Hann steig þar af baki og beið í skóginum þar til er þeir höfðu borið ofan viðinn og Svartur var einn eftir.

Hleypur Kolur þá að honum og mælti: „Fleiri munu kunna að höggva stórt en þú einn“ og setti öxina í höfuð honum og hjó hann banahögg og ríður heim síðan og segir Hallgerði vígið.

Hún mælti: „Svo skal eg þig varðveita að þig skal eigi saka.“

„Vera má það,“ segir hann, „en hinn veg dreymdi mig þó áður en eg vó vígið.“

Nú koma þeir upp í skóginn og finna Svart veginn og flytja hann heim.

Hallgerður sendi Gunnari mann til þings að segja honum vígið. Gunnar hallmælti ekki Hallgerði fyrst fyrir sendimanninum og vissu menn eigi fyrst hvort honum þótti vel eða illa. Litlu síðar stóð hann upp og bað menn sína ganga með sér. Þeir gerðu svo og fóru til búðar Njáls. Gunnar sendi mann eftir Njáli og bað hann koma út. Njáll gekk út þegar og gengu þeir Gunnar á tal.

Gunnar mælti: „Víg hefi eg að segja þér og hefir valdið kona mín og verkstjóri minn Kolur en fyrir hefir orðið Svartur húskarl þinn.“

Njáll þagði meðan hann sagði honum alla sögu.

Þá mælti Njáll: „Þurfa munt þú að láta eigi hana öllu fram koma.“

Gunnar mælti: „Sjálfur skalt þú dæma.“

Njáll mælti: „Erfitt mun þér verða að bæta öll slys Hallgerðar og mun annars staðar meira slóða draga en hér er við eigum hlut að og mun hér þó mikið á vanta að vel sé og munum við þess þurfa að muna það að við höfum vel við mælst. Og væntir mig að þér fari vel en þó munt þú verða mjög að þreyttur.“

Njáll tók sjálfdæmi af Gunnari og mælti: „Ekki mun eg halda máli þessu til kapps. Þú skalt gjalda tólf aura [1] silfurs. En það vil eg til skilja þó að nokkuð komi það úr vorum garði er þér eigið um að gera að þér stillið eigi verr gerðinni.“

Gunnar greiddi af hendi féið vel og reið heim síðan.

Njáll kom heim af þingi og synir hans.

Bergþóra sá féið og mælti: „Vel er þessu í hóf stillt en jafnmikið fé skal koma fyrir Kol er stundir líða.“

Gunnar kom heim af þingi og taldi á Hallgerði. Hún kvað betri menn liggja óbætta margstaðar. Gunnar kvað hana ráða mundu tiltekjum sínum „en eg skal ráða hversu málin lúkast.“

Hallgerður hældist jafnan um víg Svarts en Bergþóru líkaði það illa.

Njáll fór upp í Þórólfsfell og synir hans að skipa þar til bús. En þann sama dag verður sá atburður þá er Bergþóra er úti að hún sér mann ríða svörtum hesti. Hún nam staðar og gekk eigi inn. Sjá maður hafði spjót í hendi og gyrður saxi. Hún spurði þenna mann að nafni.

„Atli heiti eg,“ sagði hann.

Hún spurði hvaðan hann væri.

„Eg er austfirskur maður,“ segir hann.

„Hvert skalt þú fara?“ segir hún.

„Eg er maður vistlaus,“[2] segir hann, „og ætlaði eg að finna Njál og Skarphéðin og vita ef þeir vildu með mér taka.“

„Hvað er þér hentast að vinna?“ segir hún.

„Eg er akurgerðarmaður og margt er mér vel hent að gera,“ segir hann, „en eigi vil eg því leyna að eg er maður skapharður og hefir jafnan hlotið um sárt að binda fyrir mér.“

„Ekki gef eg þér það að sök þótt þú sért engi bleyðimaður,“ segir hún.

Atli mælti: „Ert þú nokkurs ráðandi hér?“ segir hann.

„Eg er kona Njáls,“ segir hún, „og ræð eg eigi síður hjónum en hann.“

„Vilt þú taka við mér?“ segir hann.

„Gera mun eg þér kost á því,“ segir hún, „ef þú vilt vinna það er eg legg fyrir þig og svo þótt eg vilji senda þig til mannráða.“

„Áttu svo til varið of menn,“ segir hann, „að þú munt ekki mín að slíku þurfa.“

„Það skil eg er eg vil,“ segir hún.

„Kaupa munum við að þessu,“ sagði hann.

Þá tók hún við honum.

Njáll kom heim og synir hans og spurði Bergþóru hvað manna sjá væri.

„Hann er húskarl þinn,“ segir hún, „og tók eg við honum og kveðst hann vera maður óhandlatur.“

„Ærið mun hann stórvirkur,“ segir Njáll, „en eigi veit eg hvort hann er svo góðvirkur.“

Skarphéðinn var vel til Atla.

Njáll ríður til þings of sumarið og synir hans. Gunnar var á þingi. Njáll tók upp fésjóð.

Skarphéðinn spyr: „Hvað fé er það, faðir?“[3]

„Hér er fé það er Gunnar greiddi mér fyrir heimamann vorn.“

„Koma mun þér það til nokkurs,“ sagði Skarphéðinn og glotti við.

Tilvísanir

  1. tólf aura: "Az összegek a következő módon alakulnak: Njautl szolgájáért, Svartért 12 ezüstöt kért, amely megfelelt egy cselédért fizetendő váltságnak." Gyönki, Viktória. Váltságfizetés a 10-11. századi Izlandon két nemzetségi sagában (p.29)
  2. Eg er maður vistlaus : " Although not specifically a vagrant, Atli introduces himself as a man without lodgings or employment (maðr vistlauss). This indicates that readers should be suspicious of this healthy man roaming the countryside looking for work. We immediately question why he is not in permanent employment and why he is travelling outside the moving days. There is no suggestion that he is a member of society fallen upon hard times and passed round the district as a pauper as provided for in the laws. Our prejudices are confirmed in his own summary of his character." Cochrane, Jamie. Gossips, Beggars, Assassins and Tramps (s. 63)
  3. „Hvað fé er það, faðir?“: "But the cleverest and most devastating critique the author (of Njála) makes is one that reveals the conflicting incentives generated by paying compensation, rather than taking blood revenge instead. He severely undermines the idea that feud can be settled with money or property rather than blood. He shows that compensation, unless the specie is blood or exile, is at its core self-contradicting." Miller, William Ian. Bergthora vs. Hallgerd, Part I. The Theory: Chapters 35–45 (s. 79).

Links

Personal tools